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Help - narrowed down my breed choice to 5 :)

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  • Help - narrowed down my breed choice to 5 :)

    Hi everyone

    This is my first post on this forum. We (family of 5 (three kids)) are looking to purchase a dog soon and I have been researching today. I have narrowed it down to 5 breeds at the moment (I started off with around 15!).

    We want a family-friendly dog who is great with kids and will be a loving companion. We want a large-ish dog as well.

    We don't want a guard dog but a dog which is semi-protective (at least barks at a stranger trying to enter the house) would be good. I work 5 days a week and my wife 3 days a week....so we do need a dog who can tolerate being home alone at times. We don't want a dog that shreds a lot and we really want something that is easy to groom.

    All 5 breeds we are looking at are all very energetic with daily exercise required (which we are ok with).

    Anyway, here are the five breeds and some comments I have made on each one:

    Belgian Malinois
    Seems to tick all the boxes. Does ok with being home alone. Tolerates hot weather well (we are in QLD). Doesn't shred much, easy to groom and intelligent.

    Rhodesian Ridgeback
    Seems to tick most boxes except may be more difficult to train vs the other 4 breeds in our list. May struggle being home alone, although probably better than the German Shorthaired Pointer and Hungarian Vizsla?

    Goldador
    Even though this doesn't shed as much as the Lab, it still sheds more than the other 4 breeds in my list. However, out of the 4, it is probably the happiest to be home alone and ticks all the other boxes.

    German Shorthaired Pointer
    My only concern would be how the GSP goes when it's home alone. Everything else about this breeds seems to meet our requirements.

    Hungarian Vizsla
    Like the GSP, my main concern is how the Vizsla goes being alone at home. I've also read they have a tendency to bark/moan/howl a lot. But everything else sounds great.

    I am really struggling to narrow down to one breed.

    Is there any pointers/comments/feedback that can help us make a decision! Thanks everyone

  • #2
    Hi!
    I don't know if you are an experienced dog owner but I think a Belgian Malinois might be a bit hard core unless you are really dedicated to putting a lot of ongoing work in as they are serious working dogs especially if they come from working lines and are often bred for police work and protection sports. They are often very high drive and need to be worked, trained and socialised properly. They are potentially a high maintenance dog and I would imagine it could get into serious mischief if it become bored. A Belgian Tervuren from showlines might be a better choice but they do have longer hair.

    My experience with Rhodesian Ridgebacks is that they are lovely family dogs. I have known quite a few and have also dog sat a couple. They were no trouble and had lovely natures. I only have experience with the females.

    The goldador I would be super wary of unless it comes from hip and elbow scored lines. I would prefer to get either a Golden or a lab from a breeder registered with Dogs Queensland as those breeds have to be hip and elbow scored by registered pedigree breeders because of the high incidence. Last thing you want is hip or elbow dysplasia trust me.


    The GSPs I have known are lovely dogs but don't know much abut them

    Vislas cant help you there
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 14-01-2018, 11:54 PM.

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    • #3
      Thank you Kalacreek!

      Since I posted I did a bit more reading and have narrowed it down to three:

      Rhodesian Ridgeback
      German Shorthaired Pointer
      Hungarian Vizsla

      Your reply basically stated the same reasons for me ruling out the Belgian Malinois and Goldador.

      So, down to three breeds now....

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm not overly familiar with any of the breeds you've mentioned but I would suggest you scratch the Malinois of the list unless you are willing to put loads of time into training. They are extremely high drive and will easily become problem dogs if not given the exercise, mental stimulation and training they need. They are a breed I'd usually only recommend to highly experienced dog people with a lot of time on their hands.

        I've met a few Ridgebacks, they've been lovely dogs, although some seemed a bit nervous.

        Goldador?? Why that as opposed to a Golden or a Lab? Golden retrievers still shed a lot so I'm not sure a X of lab and golden would shed any less. I actually do know a guide dog who is 3/4 Labrador and 1/4 Golden. He comes into my work for grooming, lovely dog although very excitable when not in his work gear... he also sheds like crazy.

        GSP and Vislas I have no experience with. We do have a regular member on here who has GSP's though so perhaps they'll have some advice for you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Anyone else have any feedback on these three:

          Rhodesian Ridgeback
          German Shorthaired Pointer
          Hungarian Vizsla

          The only other one we would consider would be a chocolate lab from a reputable breeder...just not sure if the shedding would be a nuisance as I'd rather a dog which did minimal shedding.

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          • #6
            Oops sorry Zeplin_Maker, I didn't see your post above mine saying you'd narrowed it down to 3!

            If you're really stuck on which breed best suits your lifestyle something good to do would be to go to a dog show and meet some breeders of the breeds you're interested in

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by zeplin_maker View Post
              The only other one we would consider would be a chocolate lab from a reputable breeder...just not sure if the shedding would be a nuisance as I'd rather a dog which did minimal shedding.
              Hi,
              They are all different but I can definitely answer your lab concern re: the shedding. I've got one myself - he's beautiful - but he sheds twice a year and each lasts for 6 months
              We've got to vacuum everyday, sometimes twice a day if there are visitors coming. Brushing doesn't seem to make any difference. But we love labrador (him in particular) so we're willing to put up with it
              I say talk to their breeders/owners and dog trainers and find out about their temperaments, the breeds' inherited genetic weakness/disease, how responsive they are to training and in the end whether it suits you and your family situation or not.
              Either breed, it needs time and hard work put into
              Good luck
              Riesa & Bowie
              Follow Bowie's escapades and his mum trying to keep up with him
              masterbowie.blogspot.com.au

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks ‘maddogdodge' !

                Yes, I am the ‘guilty party’ that owns and loves GSPs ! Maybe I should really rephrase that and say – I am owned, trained and maybe loved by 2 GSPs ! The 2 I have now are numbers 5 & 6 !

                LOL - As you said 'zeplin_maker' -
                just not sure if the shedding would be a nuisance as I'd rather a dog which did minimal shedding.
                If you are looking for a non-shedding pup – then the 3 breeds you are looking at now – ALL shed ! Maybe you need to look at getting a standard poodle ? I still class this breed as a gun dog – like the GSP and Vizsla !

                It is just a shame most of us think – Standard Poodles only run around a show ring with ridiculous looking haircuts ! They are very smart pups ! Actually beat the 3 breed choices in intelligence that you have put up !

                Well - the 3 breeds you have put up - are short haired with tiny hairs – they shed ! Boy oh boy do they shed ! These pups go through a coat change twice a year – where they can lose quite a lot of hair ! Because they are short haired – it may not be too noticeable – BUT !

                I was on a FB page today – GSP of course ! Someone asked a question regarding the most prominent colour everyone uses for seating in their house ! Not one person said white or some other pale colour ! LOL - All of them said brown – because it hides the hairs from the pup !

                But with my 2 pups – I think they missed the message on twice a year shedding ! It has helped that they are now raw fed – so they seem to not lose so much hair now ! But they shed every day and I find their hairs in so many interesting places !

                Have you any experience at all with owning a pet or a dog ! Or - Will this new pup be your first one ?

                All 3 breeds can suffer from very serious health problems. So my best advice is to do your homework diligently and thoroughly ! Registered and ethical breeders are what you should be looking for – only !

                Health testing of the breeding pair – is non-negotiable for me now for a new pup ! I have had my heart broken too many times in the past with my pups !

                Even though I love RRs – I would never own one. It is interesting that ‘maddogdodge' said the ones she has come across were timid ! Just another sad example of what so-called breeders are doing nowadays !

                RRs should be very robust, aloof and very territorial ! That is why this breed/cross breed seems to be so well liked by pig hunters !

                If you have never touched or sighted a GSP or a Vizsla – then as suggested – go to a show and just mooch around !

                In 1998 – I went to a show to find my new breed of pup ! The only time I had a smile on all my 4 cheeks was when I was watching the GSPs ! Then came number 3 and 4 !

                I am not suggesting you get a GSP or a Vizsla – but out of the 3 choices you put up – these 2 – temperament wise would be more suitable.

                But – training is also very important with these 2 breeds. I start training from the moment a pup comes to my place.

                Also, even though your 8 week old pup may be healthy when it first comes home with you – you can still ‘wreck’ it by too much exercise !

                Good Luck in your search and homework !

                Comment


                • #9
                  Finding a good breeder is very important with regards to temperament and health. Of the 5 Ridge-backs that I have known very well and dog sat, none have been nervy, they have all had rock solid temperaments. I looked after one that my then partners father had had only had for a short while after his previous Ridgy had passed, while they went away on a boys week and even though this dog had never met me she was an absolute delight! So sweet and easy and very mellow although she loved running at the beach lol! A good friend has always had Ridge-backs with her growing family and they have also been wonderful family dogs. The same applies to the GSPs that I have known, really nice friendly active dogs. They did all come from good breeders.

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                  • #10
                    I would go Vizsla or ridgeback simply because I'm not familiar with gsps.

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                    • #11
                      Malinois "Doesn't shred much, easy to groom and intelligent."

                      Funniest thing I've seen in a while. This dog will - especially as a puppy - shred everything you own the second you leave it alone in your house.

                      This is a breed for an experienced dog trainer with amazing timing (not me) - how much do you want a dog that is smarter and faster and bites much harder than you with the attitude of a toddler (what's mine is mine and what's yours is mine too). These are what the police and military prefer at the moment for getting the bad guys.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        This page has a list of non - shedding breeds at the end. The only breeds that don't shed are the curly coat pedigree breeds. And they need clipping around every 6 weeks ($80 a time for a big dog maybe more).

                        http://pantonepoodles.com/doodles.htm

                        Sweeping up is no big deal.

                        Of the criteria you have - the one I'd go for is a GAP greyhound as likes to be at home and sleep on the couch, isn't much of a guard dog but might bark if someone comes. And definitely won't shred everything.

                        Is generally great with kids and very loving.

                        The GSP and Visla are both great with kids but really not fond of being on their own. When you're doing some googling - look up puppy litter mates trouble - because getting two from the same litter to keep each other company will only make things worse.

                        Ridgebacks are also big sooks but not quite as mobile as GSP and Vizsla. Ie they like to stay home more. You need to be careful of their breeding and get one that is laid back and not anxious, and has sound bone structure (hip checks etc). I have met one ridgeback that went blind at 6 months old - genetic problem. And a heap that are just scared of everything which is weird for a lion hunting dog.

                        All the Vizsla I've met are anxious on their own. And some of the GSP. We used to have a GSP and if nobody was home it would nick off back to its previous home (we adopted as an adult) about 50km south of where we lived. Would make it in a day if my dad didn't get a phone call to intercept it half way there. We found it a new home with a baby and mum who were home all day every day or shut it inside.

                        It's not an easy decision finding the right dog for your family.

                        You might also consider rescue eg via petrescue.com.au - where the dogs looking for homes are living with other families until they find one - and they can advise and help you figure out if the dog is suitable for you. You won't always know much about the health problems it might have and it will probably shed... unless you get something from poodle rescue but it will be cheaper.

                        The rescues often have puppies too - it's a matter of making friends with them (same for breeders) and then they will let you know when they get puppies in that they think are suitable.

                        https://www.petrescue.com.au/listings/595766

                        I just found out that Hollards does not pay for problems associated with hip displasia or luxating patella - not that my dog has this but OMG that's one of the reasons you get dog health insurance. Most pet insurance is backed by hollards.

                        On the shedding thing - Labs and Golden Retrievers both shed a lot but GR have more coat so there's more shedding - if you cross these - you're going to get something that drops more fluff than a pedigree Labarador.

                        If you do decide on a labrador - you might investigate the gun dog club in Queensland for something more working variety and chosen for soundness and ask them about breeders you might meet.
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          Thanks everyone for their replies!

                          We have considered all information and have done a lot of reading the past few days. We have decided a ridgeback is for us.

                          Meeting a breeder this weekend and will have a look at the pups. She has 2 males and 1 female left.

                          Both males are ridgeless. At first I ruled them out because of this because the ridge is distinctive of the breed. But after reading it sounds like the ridge is actually a mutation and ridgless dogs wont get dermoid sinus. And its only a characteristic that won't affect them in any other way.

                          Would you own a ridgeless ridgeback??

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by zeplin_maker View Post
                            Thanks everyone for their replies!

                            We have considered all information and have done a lot of reading the past few days. We have decided a ridgeback is for us.

                            Meeting a breeder this weekend and will have a look at the pups. She has 2 males and 1 female left.

                            Both males are ridgeless. At first I ruled them out because of this because the ridge is distinctive of the breed. But after reading it sounds like the ridge is actually a mutation and ridgless dogs wont get dermoid sinus. And its only a characteristic that won't affect them in any other way.

                            Would you own a ridgeless ridgeback??
                            Yes, that is what one of my friends did. All her dogs were ridgeless and they were lovely dogs

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I'd want to see hip scores for the parent dogs and other genetic testing stuff - having a ridge back with dodgy joints is very common and expensive. If you can see a grand parent dog - how it moves when it walks and runs - that would be an indicator of a possible future.

                              I'm not bothered about the ridges - it happens. Just means no showing or breeding from that one.
                              sigpic

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