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  • Humping Spasms?

    So I'm not sure what Axle is actually doing or why, that's why I am hoping someone else may have an idea...

    For quite a while, on and off, I have noticed Axle will be relaxed, possibly sleeping (he's usually under the blankets near my feet, sometimes curled up as if he is sleeping) then his hips begin to thrust, as if he is humping.. But he's doing it lying down. He can stand while it's happening and walk towards me. It usually lasts for about 60 seconds, sometimes longer, sometimes shorter. I have only ever seen it happen really late at night or early in the morning. He has never done it during the day while I have been home.

    He hasn't done it for a while (well that I've noticed but i usually leave for work at 630 am) but he did do it this morning. I felt the bed moving and quickly pulled the blankets off him. He was lying there doing the humping motion. This time he actually seemed confused (he hasn't appeared to be confused previously)... I put my hand on him for comfort and he stood up, still doing the humping motion. This was also the first time his 'lipstick' was showing, normally it isn't so I have never considered him doing it out of pleasure. I also don't believe it's a dominance issue as 99% of the time it begins while he is laying down and then when he stands, he doesn't actually walk towards something to hump, just the air.

    I have spoken to a couple of vets and they aren't too sure. My only option is a blood test to make sure everything is okay (I think I will take him in this week for peace of mind). He stopped doing it for a few months so I thought he was over it.

    I google it today though. I found some suggestions that may cause it: a pinched spinal nerve, vitamin b deficiency, partial seizure, irritation and some others that I can't think of right now.

    I should also mention Axle is just over 3 years old, and he was neutered at 6 months old.

    Has this happened to anyone else? Or am I just worrying for nothing?

  • #2
    Oops, I should have posted this in another topic. Sorry!

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    • #3
      From the description it sounds very much like the action a dog will make IMMEDIATELY after a mating.

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      • #4
        I know after dry humping a dog at the park Jack will occasionally continue to air hump ...

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        • #5
          It could simply be air humping... The time he does it and that it starts lying down is a bit strange though. I woke up to him doing it at 330am this morning. Again, he was lying under the blankets and he didn't appear to be humping my leg or anything, and he had his back to my partner. Just strange lol.

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          • #6
            My dog twitches sometimes in her sleep. It's more like a running motion - though less expansive than actually running.

            A friend's dog has epilepsy - which is managed with medication. An epileptic fit is pretty scary to see, and probably wouldn't look like humping specifically. And in humans - they can't remember who they are or who their friends are for about 20 to 30 minutes after so it's pretty scary for them and their friends.

            I think this might be a variation on sleep-twitching.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              I just experienced the same thing with my dog, and a few Google searches led me here. It was the weirdest thing I've ever seen him do. He was laying on the couch half asleep and I was lightly petting him when it happened. I picked him up and put him on the ground after a few seconds, and he immediately stopped as soon as he was on the ground - thank god! I know it's been several years, since this post, but I'm wondering if you ever figured out what it was? Did it ever cause any other health issues? Did it continue or just go away on its own?

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              • #8
                Of course, the first thing you should do in cases like this makes a consultation to find out the vet when you can to rule out uncommon or feasible lifestyle-damaging disease. The 2 primary causes of the deficit are lack of adequate B12 in the diet regime or perhaps an inherited situation where a canine struggles or is not able to soak up the fundamental vitamin supplement whatsoever.

                If left untreated, B12 deficit can lead to severe weight loss and gastrointestinal problems also kidney disease. In case your suspicion is proved along with your dog’s ranges are reduced, to not be concerned, supplementation is simple and easy, successful! - crushable pills, fluid syringe, shot and so forth. Raising meats in the diet as well as a high-quality multi-nutritional powder to combine inside their foods every day can also be strongly suggested.

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