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Dogs aggressive towards our border collie

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  • Dogs aggressive towards our border collie

    Hi all we have a 12 month old border collie that is not desexed. Currently when we take him anywhere the frequency of dogs that seem to have an issue with him is extremely high. Today at the beach 4 other dogs that were playing fine with numerous other dogs became aggressive towards our dog. Luckily our dog is very submissive and all confrontation was quickly dismissed. After some research it seems many desexed dogs are only aggressive towards intact males. He is booked in for desexing next week but we were curious if anyone else had had the same experience. Thanks

  • #2
    Originally posted by Clintbarry View Post
    Hi all we have a 12 month old border collie that is not desexed. Currently when we take him anywhere the frequency of dogs that seem to have an issue with him is extremely high. Today at the beach 4 other dogs that were playing fine with numerous other dogs became aggressive towards our dog. Luckily our dog is very submissive and all confrontation was quickly dismissed. After some research it seems many desexed dogs are only aggressive towards intact males. He is booked in for desexing next week but we were curious if anyone else had had the same experience. Thanks
    Not sure about the desexed dogs being aggressive towards intact males! My sterilised bitches are openly flirtatious with them and my boys neutral as long as they are not eyeballed. I sterilised my boys at 2 years old and the only dogs they ever had a problem with when they were intact were other intact males when they were eyeballed or stared at.

    Your dog being submissive may be a little anxious and giving off the wrong vibe. Look at his body language carefully to see if there is anything going on that you aren't aware of.

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    • #3
      Often because a lot of BC's stare... watch your dog and see if that is what he is doing
      sigpicPets are forever

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      • #4
        Originally posted by newfsie View Post
        Often because a lot of BC's stare... watch your dog and see if that is what he is doing
        Ive just finished boarding n training a bc for a friend. I noticed aggression toward him from dogs. It was definately the "eye" behaviour causing the trouble. Very dog friendly boy 7 mnth pup but staring n crouching at other dogs got him in trouble a lot.
        Its instinctual behaviour so unable to prevent. Maybe your dog does this too?

        Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bernie View Post
          Ive just finished boarding n training a bc for a friend. I noticed aggression toward him from dogs. It was definately the "eye" behaviour causing the trouble. Very dog friendly boy 7 mnth pup but staring n crouching at other dogs got him in trouble a lot.
          Its instinctual behaviour so unable to prevent. Maybe your dog does this too?

          Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk
          Yes I have 2 Border collies and you just have to teach them not to stare at other dogs. My boy would do it and I just had to tell him to knock it off. He is pretty good these days but I do have to watch him if an entire male stares at him. He doesn't like that!. Girls can stare at him all they like!

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          • #6
            yep often standing in front of them or teaching them to "look away"... it is the most common cause
            sigpicPets are forever

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kalacreek View Post
              Not sure about the desexed dogs being aggressive towards intact males! My sterilised bitches are openly flirtatious with them and my boys neutral as long as they are not eyeballed. I sterilised my boys at 2 years old and the only dogs they ever had a problem with when they were intact were other intact males when they were eyeballed or stared at.

              Your dog being submissive may be a little anxious and giving off the wrong vibe. Look at his body language carefully to see if there is anything going on that you aren't aware of.
              Interesting as I have never thought about this, so a dog could send out the wrong vibes and cause other normal dogs to attack him? It has happened once or twice from memory, my dog (Billy) is normally good with other dogs, but one day at the local park a Westie came along, didn't seem to have done anything to provoke Billy but suddenly Billy became aggressive. I apologised immediately and I had no idea what caused it. Think there was another one like this but I can't remember the details anymore. I always thought it was entirely coming from my dog.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by furbaby View Post
                Interesting as I have never thought about this, so a dog could send out the wrong vibes and cause other normal dogs to attack him? It has happened once or twice from memory, my dog (Billy) is normally good with other dogs, but one day at the local park a Westie came along, didn't seem to have done anything to provoke Billy but suddenly Billy became aggressive. I apologised immediately and I had no idea what caused it. Think there was another one like this but I can't remember the details anymore. I always thought it was entirely coming from my dog.
                It could happen both ways, either your dog is giving off vibes which cause a dog to be reactive to him or the other dog could be sending out anxious vibes which then triggers your dog to act out.

                My BC will become reactive if another dog gives off the wrong vibes, whereas a cattle dog I have is brilliant with reactive dogs. She remains calm and does everything body language wise to reasure the other dog and calms them down. She can often be fine with dogs that are a bit fearful and reactive towards other dogs, it is very interesting to watch how she does this.

                Turid Rugaas is an expert in this field so google her and see what you can find. It is really useful to understand the subtleties as you can then watch for signs that dogs are giving you as to how they are feeling or interacting. They will often use ears, tongue, eyes, tail, body posture, vocalisations and body movements which other dogs will understand and react to, either positively or negatively.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Kalacreek View Post
                  It could happen both ways, either your dog is giving off vibes which cause a dog to be reactive to him or the other dog could be sending out anxious vibes which then triggers your dog to act out.

                  My BC will become reactive if another dog gives off the wrong vibes, whereas a cattle dog I have is brilliant with reactive dogs. She remains calm and does everything body language wise to reasure the other dog and calms them down. She can often be fine with dogs that are a bit fearful and reactive towards other dogs, it is very interesting to watch how she does this.

                  Turid Rugaas is an expert in this field so google her and see what you can find. It is really useful to understand the subtleties as you can then watch for signs that dogs are giving you as to how they are feeling or interacting. They will often use ears, tongue, eyes, tail, body posture, vocalisations and body movements which other dogs will understand and react to, either positively or negatively.
                  Good stuff, will read up on Rugaas when I have time


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