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Thread: Mini Groodle

  1. #1

    Post Mini Groodle

    Hi,
    my partner and I have been looking to buy a miniature groodle but we are finding it difficult to find breeders in Australia.
    We are from Tasmania and I would love to find a breeder down here so that we could meet the puppies and their parents before deciding on one. However, I would love to hear of any good breeders within Australia or any information about this breed that owners could offer?

    Regards,
    Ashie90

  2. #2
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    Um, the reason you can't find a miniature 'groodle' is because the socalled 'groodle' is a cross between a Golden Retriever and a Standard Poodle, both of which are large dogs.

    Perhaps look at a miniature poodle from a reg breeder.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the reply.
    I have found a few breeders of mini groodles, they are golden retrievers crossed with miniature poodles instead of the usual standard poodle.

    I would look at a purebred mini poodle however my partner does not want one and is extremely fussy

  4. #4
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    A large breed crossed with a toy breed? Mmmmhhm.

    I suggest you search The forum for 'groodle' and click the topic what on earth is a Mini Groodle? Will give you some good reading

  5. #5
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    Please don't use designer dog names. These 'breeds' are intentionally bred, and what you are getting is a mutt, no two ways about it. A GR/poodle mix is not going to look that different to an unclipped poodle - shaggy. And it will shed if you're hoping it won't. The only breeds that do not shed are the non-allergenic ones like Bichon Frise, Poodles, Lagotto, Kerry Blues, etc. 'Breeders' will advertise the dogs as having non-shedding coats, but that is impossible when the dog is half GR, which sheds a lot.

    You are taking a huge risk by buying one of these crossbreds. Both poodles and GRs have a huge amount of health issues on their own - hip and elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, congenital ear and eye problems from the poodle side of things...to name a *few*. I worked in a vet clinic that specialised in cruciate ligament repairs and 80% of the dogs that came through that door were poodle mixes, usually lab, cocker and GR x. Why would you want to willingly put yourself through this? You could possibly end up with a healthy dog...but chances are that you won't. Save yourself the money, time and heartbreak and choose a recognised breed and a breeder who health tests and clears their dogs for the known issues.


    like a rolling thunder chasing the wind...

  6. #6
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    Good post! Summed it up for me perfectly

  7. #7

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    And one thing that is very common in these sort of first crosses is that the offspring are often larger than either or both parents. Sometimes considerably larger.

    Anyone breeding them is doing it soley for money. So your other concern is that they will tell you whatever they have to to get that money from you. So super-shrewdness is needed.

    If your partner is fussy they may want to consider that you don't get predictable results from crossing two or more breeds, you get a genetic soup that can and will throw out all kinds of weird and wonderful things.

    For every soft coated poodle cross you see photos of, there are five to ten more with short hard coats, or awful wirey harsh coats that shed like a monster. These are often the ones left in backyards, or in pounds.

    Poodle crosses are typically high energy.

    So bigger than expected, possible coat and shedding issues, high energy and untested health...

    Could be alot more than you bargain for!!

  8. #8

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    Ashie, PLEASE don't buy one of those designer cross breds.
    They are not real breeds and all those cutesy photos you see are carefully selected by the "breeders". Odds are you could end up with a dog that looks and behaves nothing like they promise.

    When you cross 2 breeds, especially ones that look completely different you are taking a gamble on how they will end up looking. It could end up more like a Poodle, or more like a Retriever.

    You are also taking a HUGE gamble with your dogs health. The people who breeds these designer mutts rarely if ever health test. There are many genetic diseases that dogs can carry, some affect the dogs lively hood whether it be PRA (which causes blindness) or hip dysplasia (which can cause the dog to lose the ability to walk).

    Your husband is not picky, he is irresponsible and needs to learn about the health and welfare of dogs, not appearances.

    Why not go for a purebred Curly Coated Retriever, Curly Coated Retriever - Breeders - Puppies - Australia
    Or a Portugese Water Dog, Portuguese Water Dog - Breeders - Puppies - Australia

  9. #9
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    Sorry - I have to disagree with many points made in this post.

    Anyone breeding them is doing it soley for money. - There is simply no logic or truth behind statements such as this. All manner of people love dogs and care for their dogs. All manner of people enjoy animal husbandry. Just because they happen to not value a pedigree, it does not mean they are looking at the profit scenario only.

    However, I also agree with many statements above.
    When you cross 2 breeds, especially ones that look completely different you are taking a gamble on how they will end up looking. It could end up more like a Poodle, or more like a Retriever. Absolutely. It may look like one breed, the other or somplete different breed altogether. With a pure bred dog, you will know exactly what the dog will look like every time.

    You do not know what issues you will encounter in your mixed breed pup as there is an incredibly high chance that the people breeding the dogs have not health tested the parents, or are even aware of the parent's pedigrees. This means that buying a cross bred dog increases your chances of having a dog that develops health issues.

    I find this one also a little bit difficult to believe - vet clinic that specialised in cruciate ligament repairs and 80% of the dogs that came through that door were poodle mixes, usually lab, cocker and GR x. Given that the genes for these issues are carried by a particular breed, I can't see how logically crossing a dog increases the risk and produces more of the issues. Genetics just doesn't work like that. That is like the crossbreeders saying that corss bred dogs have less issues - again, genetics just don't work like that.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #10
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    I kept count of how many dogs were poodle x's, Anne, I have been a vet nurse for years and the amount of overweight/bowlegged/lame oodles I have seen is insane.


    like a rolling thunder chasing the wind...

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