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Thread: Border Collie Stud Dog Wanted

  1. #1

    Default Border Collie Stud Dog Wanted

    I`m after a short to medium haired Border Collie, preferably from working stock to be used as a stud dog. Fee and/or pup from litter as payment.
    email me at thegamedog@hotmail.com

  2. #2

    Default

    And this would be a registered breeding of course

    Are you looking to breed a hot worker?
    GageDesign Pet Photography
    Site still in construction so will post link when it's finished.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Bullcat

    There are loads of homeless working dogs in the world already. Why not get one of those instead of breeding yours?

    Why would anyone with a quality border collie want to risk their dog's reputation as a stud by doing a deal with you? What has your bitch got to recommend herself? What genetic health tests have you done? What shows/herding comps/working has your dog done or is she just a pet? What is her temperment like - is she confident and friendly or timid and aggressive? Do you have written committments for quality homes for the puppies?

    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    A responsible companion animal breeder will:

    1. Conscientiously attempt to match the demand of animals with the supply - in this way they proactively avoid creating an oversupply of animals. Breeding too many animals would mean that some of them may be euthanased or end up at a shelter as an unwanted animal and responsible breeders try to avoid this as they have the animals welfare at heart.

    2. Provide a high standard of care and living conditions for their animals - animals are kept in a clean environment with adequate high quality food and water and are given the opportunity to exercise, play and lead a normal life.

    3. Demonstrate a genuine concern for the animals in their care - they tend to ask prospective buyers many questions and ensure that the new owner and the animal will be a good match. e.g. a working dog is only sold to a person who can provide this type of active dog with enough mental and physical activity.

    4. Be open and transparent and provides a complete history of the animal - the breeder will provide you with documentation relating to the animal and its parents, grandparents etc.

    5. Will be aware of any known inherited disorders for their particular breed and take active steps to reduce the incidence of that disorder in future offspring - the breeder screens breeding animals using available tests and avoids mating animals that are likely to produce sick offspring. They also avoid mating closely related animals.

    6. Provide ongoing support and information to the new owner - the breeder will give their full contact details and encourage you to call them if you have any questions of concerns.

    7. Will generally provide a guarantee (timeframes may vary) - the most responsible breeders will often ask you to bring the puppy back to them if it doesn't work out in order to avoid the puppy ending up at a shelter as an unwanted animal.

    8. Provide references on request - the breeder provides you with references form reputable sources such as their veterinarian or people who have purchased puppied form them in the past.

    10. Comply with the relevant local and state/territory legislation and codes of practice including any registration and licensing requirements.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    Default

    Yes as the owner of a beautiful working bred shortcoated male BC from some of the best international and Australian working lines I would agree with the above. I would not be breeding my dog unless he proves himself as a top working dog and has been evaluated for all the characteristics that would make him worthy of breeding and I would expect the same of the bitch.

    There are plenty of cast off Border collies looking for homes and also pups from farm breedings, backyard breedings and registered show and working breeders available most of the time. Why add more unless there was a real purpose and the dog is an excellent evaluated working bitch.

  5. #5

    Default

    Sorry I asked...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullcat View Post
    Sorry I asked...
    Yes well you didnt give much detail and many of us are passionate about our breeds and see the fall out of poorly matched breedings.

    The Border Collie has been subject to a lot of that and I have seen many dogs with poor temperaments, genetic problems and dumped in pounds and rescue and whole litters die from TNS because the parents were not tested prior to breeding.

    I am passionate about the true working bred BC and all that goes with the breeding of such a wonderful creature.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-07-2011 at 11:35 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Bullcat

    I wouldn't be sorry. You've got a whole new way to think about what you're trying to do now. And you can expect similar response from anyone with a quality dog, if you're not prepared or you find someone with a dog that's willing to give you a go without asking any questions - you're not going to get a quality result.

    You could end up with a litter of fear aggressive puppies with exercised induced collapse or blindness...

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