Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: Info on Rottweilers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    46

    Default Info on Rottweilers

    Hi guys,
    I am considering purchasing a rottie pup/ young dog from a good registered reptuable breeder some time this year or early next year. BUT before i take the plunge (have wanted one ever since i was a young girl) i want to get as much information as i can about the breed and some recomnedations for breeders..

    i have been madly googling and sending emails to some breeders that have websites up, but i would like any personal experence insite if possible.

    i think i am ready to take on the challange of a rottie (have had several boistorus dogs through out my life - BC, Kelpies, JRTs labs etc) and know that huge amounts of training will be required as they are strong minded dogs.

    thanks guys

    ps sorry if there are a million spelling mistakes- i am currently functioning on about 1 hours worth of sleep and i can't get the spell check to work :/

  2. #2

    Default

    I did rottie rescue for years & they are great dogs & very trainable. They have a strong drive to please & if trained from the start are very managable breed.
    When choosing a breeder of Rotties I would go with 1 that has many yrs breeding & countinues to improve on their dogs with imp & new bloodlines.
    Health testing is a must as there are a few health issues within the breed.
    The breeder should be happy to continue giving you advise & help for the lifetime of the dog. They should also be quick to advise you on correct socialization of your new pup.
    I would go to a kennel that dose not breed heaps of litters every year also as their follow up care would be mim & the pups upbringing may not be of the best standard.
    Of course visit any kennel in person that you are thinking of buying off.
    I will probley come back to this thread & post some links for you later today.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  3. #3

    Default

    I have a Rottie and they are a beautiful breed with the right upbringing. You need to spend a LOT of time with them and work their minds as well as their bodies. They are very agile and mine can easily scale a 6ft fence. They love to swim and mine has her own pool.

    With regards to health, I would ask the breeder whether there is any history of Sub-aortic Stenosis in her pedigree. Some breeders consider this condition not genetic, however it is recognised as being herediary in the USA in Rottweilers. It's a condition they are not required to test for and not required to tell you about any history of it.

    I can't recommend any breeders in your area, good luck.

  4. #4

    Default

    I have only recently heard about this Mollinater do you know if it's always been a problem with Aus rotties & if not when did it start?
    Great advise & ask to see reports for any medical testing they say they do. You'd be surpriced the amount that can not back up their claims with vet/lab reports.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    46

    Default

    Thanks guys. I think i might have found a suitable stud to put my name down on a waiting list as i wont be able to take one on until the end of the year.

    All their dogs look wonderful and I will be making arrangements for a few visits before i decide.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LisaK View Post
    Thanks guys. I think i might have found a suitable stud to put my name down on a waiting list as i wont be able to take one on until the end of the year.

    All their dogs look wonderful and I will be making arrangements for a few visits before i decide.
    Great way too go as 1 off visit can be a little misleading but go a few times & you'll get a more honest idea of whats what.
    See if you can contact a few prevous puppy buyers & not only the ones the breeder tells you about.
    A good breeder will be happy your so enthusatic.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crazydog View Post
    I have only recently heard about this Mollinater do you know if it's always been a problem with Aus rotties & if not when did it start?
    Great advise & ask to see reports for any medical testing they say they do. You'd be surpriced the amount that can not back up their claims with vet/lab reports.
    It's not very common in Australia (yet), however it's very common in the US. Having said that, a heart ultrasound is required to diagnose it and I'm sure there are many people out there who don't know their dog has it and the dog just drops dead one day. I don't think too many pet owners would have an ortopsy done so they would never know.

    Unfortunately the problem will become worse over time because the effected lines are still being bred from.

  8. #8

    Default

    I would be taking Mollinator's advice very seriously.

    A good way, read as much as you can about the breed, and any breed-specific health issues that can crop up. If you try and sound a little bit confident in your basic knowledge of the breed, you'll be less likely to be given a "sales pitch" if the person you're speaking happens to be more interested in your cash than your long term happiness with your pup.

    That's certainly not the usual, but it can and does happen in buying and selling of anything, from used cars to puppies. Protect yourself, like you would with any big, long trem investment, and you'll be more likely to find the perfect match that you're looking for.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mollinator View Post
    It's not very common in Australia (yet), however it's very common in the US. Having said that, a heart ultrasound is required to diagnose it and I'm sure there are many people out there who don't know their dog has it and the dog just drops dead one day. I don't think too many pet owners would have an ortopsy done so they would never know.

    Unfortunately the problem will become worse over time because the effected lines are still being bred from.
    Thanks for the info, so it came with IMP bloodlines ah, it's very hard to convince alot of reg show breeders to stop using an IMP or it's direct relitives due to the cost of IMP & the $$$ it add to a litter to have IMP behind it's parents names.
    This has lead to many genetic problems becoming a problem within breeds that had never had or been badly affect by a the particular genetic issue before the new bloodlines where introduced.
    Dogs make everyday life enjoyable...........

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crazydog View Post
    Thanks for the info, so it came with IMP bloodlines ah, it's very hard to convince alot of reg show breeders to stop using an IMP or it's direct relitives due to the cost of IMP & the $$$ it add to a litter to have IMP behind it's parents names.
    This has lead to many genetic problems becoming a problem within breeds that had never had or been badly affect by a the particular genetic issue before the new bloodlines where introduced.
    I guess by IMP you mean imported? I never said she was from imported bloodlines.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •