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Thread: Border Collie x Kelpie

  1. #1

    Default Border Collie x Kelpie

    Hi guys and Gals
    Well as you can see Im new to this forum. I have hunted you lot down to see if anyone can assist.

    I currently have a male Border Collie x Kelpie. He is a super work dog and originally came off a farm (though he has been living in the city for the last few years and it shows). His father was a "super" shed dog, his mother the farmers best field dog. Though he has done little work he makes a supurb farm/work dog (or even just a great friend).

    He is still and entire male, and I am considering putting him across a female. He is about 8yo (is this too old to breed?).
    Is there anyone with a similar mix (prefer short/medium hair) female work dog who would be willing to share a litter?
    I am based in WA and are willing to travel to most places in the state as required.

    I have (I think) attached a picture of him - like his human, he is incredibly handsome.

    Thanks for any assistance.

    Blacky

    IMG_2363.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    Blacky

    There are so many dogs just like yours in the shelters across the country, it seems really unfair that you want to make more of them.

    It's not the right thing to do.

    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    A responsible breeder -
    1. Conscientiously attempt to match the demand of animals with the supply - in this way they proactively avoid creating an oversupply of animals. Breeding too many animals would mean that some of them may be euthanased or end up at a shelter as an unwanted animal and responsible breeders try to avoid this as they have the animals welfare at heart.
    There are loads of farm dog crosses in the pounds - a massive over supply.

    If your dog was winning herding trials and in regular herding work - there might be a queue of farmers for your puppies but you can't expect city people to be dedicated enough to their dog to give it the kind of mental and physical work it would need without a paddock full of sheep to round up. Of all the dog owners around - these kind of people are fewest in number.

    2. Provide a high standard of care and living conditions for their animals - animals are kept in a clean environment with adequate high quality food and water and are given the opportunity to exercise, play and lead a normal life.

    3. Demonstrate a genuine concern for the animals in their care - they tend to ask prospective buyers many questions and ensure that the new owner and the animal will be a good match. e.g. a working dog is only sold to a person who can provide this type of active dog with enough mental and physical activity.
    4. Be open and transparent and provides a complete history of the animal - the breeder will provide you with documentation relating to the animal and its parents, grandparents etc.
    Really? Can you do this it a multi generation bitsa?

    5. Will be aware of any known inherited disorders for their particular breed and take active steps to reduce the incidence of that disorder in future offspring - the breeder screens breeding animals using available tests and avoids mating animals that are likely to produce sick offspring. They also avoid mating closely related animals.
    Have you done any DNA testing, do you know how sound your dog is?

    6. Provide ongoing support and information to the new owner - the breeder will give their full contact details and encourage you to call them if you have any questions of concerns.
    7. Will generally provide a guarantee (timeframes may vary) - the most responsible breeders will often ask you to bring the puppy back to them if it doesn't work out in order to avoid the puppy ending up at a shelter as an unwanted animal.
    Will you take these puppies back and give them your home when they enter the unmanageable teenager stage? Or as puppies - demolish the furniture in order to amuse themselves in their new homes?

    8. Provide references on request - the breeder provides you with references form reputable sources such as their veterinarian or people who have purchased puppied form them in the past.
    Do you have any references or experience when it comes to dog breeding. Do you understand all the health risks that the bitch takes in having a litter of puppies? Would you be willing to share the vet costs that go with having a litter of puppies?

    10. Comply with the relevant local and state/territory legislation and codes of practice including any registration and licensing requirements.
    Do you know what these are in your state?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

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    Like Hya said

    If i was buying another work dog ( and we have in the past) I would never buy one who's parents were not working...i would not take any notice of the comment, his father and mother worked. I would like to see my pups parents work.........

    And like Hya said there are so many working breed sweet dog in the pound/shelters/rescue.....just have a look how many are on the current Kill list Have just re-homed two beautiful pure BC's that are gorgeous dogs and were on a kill list...We don't need anymore puppies.......
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    26

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    Agree with both replies already, there are so many dogs PTS in Australia and a lot are working dogs.

    Why do you want to breed him? is it cause you want another working dog or to get another dog with the same features etc

    If it is just because you think he needs to have "sex" - dont do it, dogs dont think like we do about sex lol

    I work in Rescue and also in WA and see a lot of dogs being impounded without any hope of rescue and really am against breeding unless you have pedigree dogs or have a definite purpose ie: breeding working dogs with dogs that are proven workers in this case - so I say to you, please dont breed your boy, enjoy him for the company and companionship he gives to you

    If you want another working dog, contact AWDRI as they specialise in rescuing working dogs

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi

    Thanks for your responses. I already have a market for any pups which I end up with. The farmer who I got Bomb from actually asked me if I would be willing to breed from him, and provide all pups I end up with to them. I also want a couple for myself. I hadnt actually considered breeding him until the farmer asked.

    I will take head of your comments above though and reconsider.

    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    SE QLD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blacky View Post
    Hi

    Thanks for your responses. I already have a market for any pups which I end up with. The farmer who I got Bomb from actually asked me if I would be willing to breed from him, and provide all pups I end up with to them. I also want a couple for myself. I hadnt actually considered breeding him until the farmer asked.

    I will take head of your comments above though and reconsider.

    Thanks
    Do you have enough homes for up to 12 puppies though? I agree with the other posts. IMO unless you are a registered breeder you shouldn't be breeding at all.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blacky View Post
    Hi

    Thanks for your responses. I already have a market for any pups which I end up with. The farmer who I got Bomb from actually asked me if I would be willing to breed from him, and provide all pups I end up with to them. I also want a couple for myself. I hadnt actually considered breeding him until the farmer asked.

    I will take head of your comments above though and reconsider.

    Thanks
    Be careful a lot of farmers (and not saying this one is one of them) will shoot dogs that dont work out or are not good livestock workers so be aware of this

    Love your dogs name

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

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    Shoot or drown.
    I have seen tubs of drowned farm puppies.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
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    Shot, drown or dump..Just look at all the Rural pounds...........If you want puppies there a lots of them, probably also from working lines
    Pets are forever

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