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Thread: Best dry food for highly active dogs?

  1. #1

    Default Best dry food for highly active dogs?

    Well my dog is now over 2 years old, and so it's probably time to be moving him off the puppy food. Dry food makes up about 50% of his diet, the rest consists of daily bones, meat and chicken, eggs, fish and leftovers. My only concern is, I have a lot of trouble keeping weight on him even with the puppy food, he is a very active dog. He would typically do upwards of about 2 hours exercise every day (some days a lot more), and intense exercise at that - be it leaping through the waves with us at the beach, mountain climbing/trekking as we've done twice this week or running along next to my bike. He loves all of this, he's the sort of dog who will run up a mountain, chase rabbits at top speed for hours and still not be tired. He is looking fantastic at the moment - best he's ever looked but I'm guessing it's not good for adult dogs to be on puppy food? He is currently about a 2/5 (with 3 being ideal) according to that scale they have at the vet, so I wouldn't even mind getting a bit more weight on him if anyone has any suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Macleod, Melbourne.
    Posts
    51

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    99bottles as I am sure you have gathered, the major difference between puppy food and adult is that it has a much higher fat content.

    I can tell you how to put weight on your dog easily but it wouldn't be with the use of kibble. Having said that, any expert will agree that it is better to have a lean dog than an overweight dog. Being lean is a positive. IF (and I say "if" because I don't know the exact amounts you are feeding), your dog is still lean even though it is eating well, you are on a good thing. Like humans, it's about the "right" kinds of fats vs the amount consumed vs the amount of exercise.

    Like I said if it concerns you that much I would be more than happy to show you how to put weight on your dog but I don't use kibble.

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for your reply. Do you think it's ok for me to just keep him on the puppy food then if he's not overweight? Are there any other differences?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Macleod, Melbourne.
    Posts
    51

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    There is no easy answer, especially coming from me. In short, in a general sense without knowing which dry food it is, I would suggest you google search each ingredient in the puppy and adult dry foods you have chosen and see what the positives and negatives are and then make up your mind. The concerns you may have of the possible ill effects of puppy food or even kibble in general will more likely be seen many years down the track.

    As far as the fat content is concerned if your dog is so active I can't see that being a problem short term. It's more about the quality of the fat and the ingredients.

    Sorry I don't mean to sound vague but I am trying to give you an honest answer.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,685

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    I have done a lot of research on dry dog food, because clients ask me so often....I think the Black Hawk is really about the best you can buy in Australia for your Dollar and because it has no preservatives and colouring used. It is also wheat free.

    I use it when we travel and cannot use RAW.....I still prefer RAW.

    You can only judge dry dog food by the quality you buy.....There is so much of it so full of preservatives and Colouring and lota and lota of wheat.........Read the labels down tothe nitty gritty, small print and all
    Pets are forever

  6. #6

    Default

    Anyone here uses Science Diet? I was advised by our Vet to use this to feed our pup and until she older
    m<(o.o)>m

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

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    Your dog needs adult food not puppy food. It can be a reason he's not holding weight as well, particularly in some brands. 2/5 depending on breed is not always a bad thing. My oldest has been at 2 all her life she's a shocker to try and keep weight on . The thing to look at is muscle mass, and try and have a little fat coating in order to help them through any illnesses. I find soaking home brand minute oats in warm water until they're mushy helps a lot with conditioning, add a tin of fish in there too. Very active dogs too need to be fed a couple of times a day to ensure they are not eating away at their own reserves.

    If you want a dry I say Royal Canin Maxi adult (no matter the breed), dont go any more protein or it sends them potty (and watch the weight go down) I find the power/energy formulas in the premiums are the same. More energy and they lose more weight, it's not really made for skinny dogs. Feed half that and soaked oats with any meat/raw you feed.


    As for science diet I think it's absolute rubbish.

  8. #8

    Default

    Science diet looks like crap from the ingredients.

    Never thought about the fact that the extra protein could be keeping him skinny. I feed him a lot of fatty marrow and lamb bones but he just burns it all off. He definitely has developed muscles - his body actualy looks remarkably like a horse - even the way he moves, it's just very smooth and muscley.

    I will try him on some adult foods. Problem is he's a fussy eater, and I think the reason he's looking so good at the moment is because with the new puppy, he has been eating a lot more (she will eat his if he doesn't and he can't bear the thought). I worry that if they're on different foods, and his is less tasty than the puppy food, he won't eat it. That's why I was wondering if there was like an extra tasty high performance dry I could switch him to.

    With the oats is it just normal oats - like what I eat for porridge? And what if he won't eat that? For example last night I gave the dogs some left overs - chicken with a tomato based sauce, rice and peas. Zoe (the puppy who is a very good eater) gobbled up everything, barely noticing what she was eating. Sammy sniffed over his very carefully, removed the chicken and left everything else. He actually spat out a few peas that made it into his mouth.

  9. #9

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    Most dogs like porridge oats. I use the quick cooking ones, and cook them with a little milk powder. If your dg is senstive to milk you can use gravy powder. I've used it successfully to get weight on ex racing hounds and it's done very well.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Most dogs like porridge oats. I use the quick cooking ones, and cook them with a little milk powder. If your dg is senstive to milk you can use gravy powder. I've used it successfully to get weight on ex racing hounds and it's done very well.
    I will try this. I once tried to use yoghurt to cover tiny specks of mashed up vegetables (trying to switch him to complete raw), and although yoghurt is normally his favourite food, he turned it down when he found vegetables in it. Never tried oats though. Have tried pasta and rice though and he point blank refuses to eat those Maybe gravy will be too good to refuse though.

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