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Thread: Triangle of Temptation

  1. #1
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    Default Triangle of Temptation

    K9: I have had a massive amount of success with this program. I started it when working dogs in drive & have spent many years building it into a program that can be used on any dog. It has no down sides when carried out correctly. I have yet to come across a program that can be used on every dog with this much success.

    This is a training in drive program.

    When I explain drives to people, I explain that there is a trigger, threshold, drive initialisation, drive peak & drive satisfaction.

    I explain that this program puts the dog into the area of its drive in which it can learn most effectively.

    Drive is a subconscious reaction to stimuli, its also an adrenalin based behaviour.

    So this makes for a very fast complying & reliable dog that learns very fast...

    I have used it for general pets, competition dogs, sport dogs, working dogs, problem dogs, puppies & dogs with phobias, all with great success.

    It serves perfect for the basis of obedience training & bond building, it ensures that the old rule of training is carried out effectively, which is

    "The command is an opportunity to earn a reward"

    Each time the dog receives a command in the Triangle, it ends with the dog eating which is drive satisfaction, its very hard to go wrong.

    The exercises also are taught in drive which is the most effective training method in the world.

    You end up creating a list of commands that are all thought of (by the dog) as positive...

    There are no corrections applied in the triangle.

    It helps train the handler / owner to use raining markers also & communicate with their dogs effectively.

    Whilst it looks like a simple feeding program, I have spent many years perfecting every step both from the perspective of a behaviourist & a trainer.

    I must have prescribed this to well over 20 000 people, not one failed to have results with it that carried it out correctly.

    It enhances the Alpha status of the person who commands the triangle, this can be anyone or every one in your home. It prevents rank issues both with human & dog pack members. It can be modified slightly to cure pre existing rank issues...

    It can serve as a diagnostic program that can give a strong insight to how the dog views the handler, simple observation of the dog when it is released to eat can tell you if the dog has trust (see's you as the Alpha) or not. Does the dog run straight to the food & eat or circle the bowl so it may watch you when it eats...

    I personally wont start training a new dog of mine until it eats without watching me... If it doesn't see me as the Alpha, I cant trigger pack drive, my training will go slowly if at all...

    It is a training in drive with distraction program also, it can be taken anywhere, a dog experienced in the TOT can have it taken on the road.

    The temptation can be anything your dog wants, it teaches the dog to ask your permission to partake in anything...

    I am putting the base program here & Morgan has agreed to pin it so that people can access it easily & have the same successes others here have had.

    I would be happy to hear from others having success using it.

    The only condition I ask for is that if this is distributed, its done by linking to this page & my contact details are included. This ensures I can be contacted for any difficulties...


    Triangle of Temptation.


    This is a behaviour, pack structure & obedience program that takes nearly no time from your day. I created this program after many years of working with dogs.

    This is the basic/generic version of the program, I modify it slightly with the same basic technique to solve problems & go into advanced learning.

    It's remarkably effective for gaining control with no force. I have used it with dogs for many years that have been trained to engage a man in combat & would not hesitate to attack me if it were not for this program. I have also used it to rehab extremely fearful dogs that would otherwise not even look at me.

    It's also the basis of the bonding program I specify to just about all my clients…

    The bases of this program is to have the dog look to you for guidance & permission to partake in anything you say that the dog can, including food, toys, game etc. Our goal is to have the dog engage self control out of respect for you. This teaches the dog to control its drive & strengthen its mind.

    The key to starting is to have a food driven dog, if you don't have a dog with a high food drive, miss the meal before you start or at least reduce it by ¾. Fasting is healthy for dogs.

    Now you have a dog that wants the food, this means the dog will have drive for the food.

    This is a training IN drive program.

    Training in drive uses the drive concept that "drive is a subconscious reaction to stimuli", this program works fast on any dog.

    Next back tie your dog with a flat buckle collar (non correctional collar) & rope to something solid in your yard. Make sure all other dogs are out of site, we are looking for as low a distraction as possible. Learning is best done under no distraction; we are trying to trigger food drive, not possessiveness, so no other animals.

    Prepare the meal inside & this should be done after all higher members have eaten. Your dog will learn, through positive results in this program that being tied out will end in drive satisfaction ie: Positive reinforcement. This is good if you have a dog that whines on a tie out.

    At the end of the program you will have a list of things, such as being tied out, long sit stays etc that are all thought of as positive to your dog.

    Allow your dog to relax on the back tie, a few minutes is usually enough. Don't go out to a whining dog.

    Now bring out your dogs food, show it to your dog, & begin to walk out in front of your dog, your looking for that moment in distance that your dog looks like the food wasn't for him or her after all. Basically taking the dog just out of full food drive.

    Your trying to trigger the dogs' high food drives but not so high as to make self control impossible, this would be called drive peak. This distance for some dogs is 2 metres, other 10 metres.

    Now you will find our dog looking at the food, possibly trying to get to it, this is what you want.

    If the dog is going to hysterics, move the food further away. (This would be an example of full food drive peak)

    What it shows is that the dog thinks that he is entitled to the food, but that's not the case.

    Approach your dog & stand at his right hand side, stand quietly whilst the dog gets all excited for the food. Look at your dog & wait. Say nothing.

    One of two things will happen, either the dog will go on & on & just stare at the food or he will look at you.

    If he doesn't look, say the dogs name. You want to see the dog look at you, when he/she does be quick to "mark" the look with "yes" then release the dog with an OK (free) command & let the dog loose to eat the food, you should sound very happy.

    Many people tell me they already do most of this, do it exactly as described. Missing the verbal marker & the free command will change the outcome…

    The next evening you will repeat the same. This exercise is very effective, as you need to feed your dogs anyway, so they may as well learn at the same time.

    You are looking to repeat this until when you place the food down, the dog looks at you & not the food. I can have most dogs do this in 2 – 4 days. The dog does not need to give you total attention unless you're looking for competition level results.

    Looking at you means the dog sees you as the person in charge; he has given up staring at the food as he knows that it's you who say when he can have it, & he can only have it when you say so.

    Now its time to add the sit command when you stand next to the dog. As soon as the dog sits, you verbal mark with yes.

    Bend down & unleash the dog, give OK command so the dog may eat. Always go inside when you release the dog. Dont allow the leash to steal your respect.... Make sure the dog only releases when the "ok" command is given, not the snap of the leash...

    The triangle is formed by drawing a line between you, the dog & the temptation.

    When you have a good sit, as that is what is being built here, you can add time, by saying stay & then verbal mark yes after 10 seconds, then 60 seconds & so on.

    Remove the back tie & keep it in your hands, if the dog should break the stay, you begin again.

    Your looking to increase the time the dog has to stay sitting by reasonable increments per day until you get over three minutes. This is all standing right next to your dog. Think of the achievement so far, your dog will tie out happily; it will sit, stay & give you attention, all in the presence of food.

    When three minutes has been gained & you will be certain you can go farther, start to increase the distance between you & the dog, whilst holding the tie out rope.

    You should increase this distance by increments of 1 - 2 metres.

    Up until you did this, the dog was viewing the food (temptation) as unobtainable, & you as unbeatable.

    Now by increasing the distance the dog will start to feel the food is obtainable & you just might be beatable.

    The long rope will teach the dog very quickly that you are not.

    The rule you need to remember is:

    Time before distance before distraction.

    This is essential for a marked improvement every day.

    When you find yourself able to wander inside while the food bowl sits there UN touched by the dog, you're ready to add distraction.

    Allow a second dog now to eat from its own bowl perhaps, remain out of site for a period of time, and change the environment to outside the front gate perhaps. These are just some ways to add distraction.

    Build reliability into your dog by working it.

    When you're at this level you will never have a dominance problem with your dog, you can't have, he looks at you to make the big decisions, like when he can have his treasure.

    Feel free to substitute the food for another treasure, such as a treat, ball, toy or an open back door or front gate.

    The key is that this gives you control of all the treasures in life, each repetition is positively rewarded at the end by allowing the dog the treasure, when you say he can have it.

    This is the generic version of this program, we modify this program many ways to suit different applications, from nervy stressful dogs to rank aggressive dogs to high level competitors.

    I use a prey item in the TOT to teach bite work, comp heeling etc etc…

    The power words your dog learns are yes & ok, these should translate into the teaching & training of every commend you teach your dog…

    We can tailor this program to suit all applications.

    This article is copyright protected (2000) © and can not be used or distributed without K9 force consent. You are, however, allowed to distribute this link to direct people to this site.
    Steve Courtney, K9 Pro - The K9 Professionals

    www.k9pro.com.au

    Official Forum Trainer and Behaviourist

  2. #2
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    all of the above I did with clicker training, and succeeded. How is it different? I just changed confirmation "yes" with clicking. It worked.

    good post btw , thanks

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    all of the above I did with clicker training, and succeeded. How is it different? I just changed confirmation "yes" with clicking. It worked.

    good post btw , thanks
    K9: No different except for the clicker. The click in your case represents the marker in which I use the verbal yes, then no need to carry a clicker.

    The idea is that this teaches the dog & handler communication skills & timing that they can use throughout all styles of training.

    I feel that having the handler actually speak to the dog retains more respect from the dog & it saves having to each new handlers clicker training principles.

    But you can (as you have) certainly use a clicker if that is your chosen way.
    Steve Courtney, K9 Pro - The K9 Professionals

    www.k9pro.com.au

    Official Forum Trainer and Behaviourist

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    IMHO the difference is that a clicker is far quicker and more accurate - easier to press a button than to wait for the word, especially for people new to training. Just in my experience of course.

    Have you ever done any training with clickers steve?

  5. #5
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    IMHO the difference is that a clicker is far quicker and more accurate - easier to press a button than to wait for the word, especially for people new to training. Just in my experience of course.

    Have you ever done any training with clickers steve?
    K9: Yep absolutely, many of my competition clients were using them before coming to me & as the association of reward was already there, we stay with it.

    Having said that, the TOT is a very adjustable program that really anyone can follow, so in its basic form I didn't want to make it a clicker training program meaning that would be another initiative people would need to undertake.

    and, as someone once said recently, I train & get away with as least equipment I can.

    This begins as a feeding program, we use a back tie, food bowl & that's it. The idea really is to get your average Joe to uptake this at home & feel confident doing it.

    Once we get the foundation down, it can be taken in many other ways & then many other facets of training can be added.
    Steve Courtney, K9 Pro - The K9 Professionals

    www.k9pro.com.au

    Official Forum Trainer and Behaviourist

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    Ok, but my question still stands. Have you, yourself, done any clicker training?

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    O: Ok, but my question still stands. Have you, yourself, done any clicker training?
    K9: I don't train my dogs with a clicker no, I don't advise people to use clickers in lessons as we achieve the results without the clicker, never found a situation that I actually needed a clicker, but as I said, I have quite a few clients that use CT to shape certain parts of their routine, & in those lessons I do use a clicker yes & if someone comes asking to be instructed with a clicker then we use one were applicable.
    Steve Courtney, K9 Pro - The K9 Professionals

    www.k9pro.com.au

    Official Forum Trainer and Behaviourist

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    Perhaps you should, just to add to your already overflowing toolbox.

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    K9: Were doing very well so will just stay on that track right now.
    Steve Courtney, K9 Pro - The K9 Professionals

    www.k9pro.com.au

    Official Forum Trainer and Behaviourist

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by k9force View Post
    K9: Were doing very well so will just stay on that track right now.
    Clicker or no clicker - same thing (for me, anyway). For me, clicker is just a tool. But for people who don't know much, is in a way good, because they themselves get used to that habit of praising dog when they should. Dogs react to a sound, it may be clapping instead of clicking, may be the word "yes" k9 is using... whatever is easier for a person.
    I used clicker, but I kept forgetting it when going out, there's really no or very little difference.

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