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Thread: Big Dog Attacked My Little Dog

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Brisbane
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    52

    Default Big Dog Attacked My Little Dog

    Was out walking Pixel just now when this massive dog ran over and attacked her for no reason. The kid walking it had no control, so I had to pull it off Pixie myself. Even then the kid was unable to keep it off her, so I had to block it until I could pick Pixel up.

    I was livid and told him you don't walk a dangrous dog you can't control, and he claimed it's not dangerous and has never done this before etc, but I told him it's definitely dangerous when it would run over and attack my dog.

    The dog must be around 40-50 kg, and my dog is 4.5 kg.

    When I asked the kid where he lives, he mysteriously forgot which street and number, and when I said I would follow him home, he ran away. I ran home and got hubby and we tracked them down by running up the street where they had gone and asking some kids if they had seen them.

    We knocked on the door to let them know that the dog should not be walked by kids, and the dad apologised and was just happy that my dog is ok.

    When we got home I checked Pixel more thoroughly and she seems to be fine, but my hubby now insists that I can't walk her on my own anymore, as I obviously can't protect her.

    I don't really know what to do, I am now scared to take Pixel out because this happened about 100 metres up the street from our house.

    Does this classify as a dangerous dog? And what can I do?

    I am so upset am I literally shivering and in tears.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Victoria
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    4,241

    Default

    If she was actually 'attacked' it would have been a good idea to take her to the vet.
    Education not Legislation

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Canberra
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    Default

    Honestly, I think you need to take a deep breath and calm down. You do not want to exaggerate this event in any way. You could have a dog put down for no more than a scuffle.

    Obviously it was very upsetting, but you need to think tomorrow, when there is a little less emotion involved, about how and even if you want anything to go ahead with this dog.

    With your dog I would be still walking it, just take a different way.

  4. #4
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    Victoria
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    Some dogs just don't like each other.
    Not all humans get along, so why should dogs?
    Education not Legislation

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
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    Default

    Well I don't know how to interpret it. The other dog came around a corner, about 5-10 metres from where I was walking Pixel. She always perks up a bit when she sees other dogs, but she didn't bark or growl or do anything. As soon as the other dog saw her, it ran towards us, towing the kid. I immediately bent down to pick Pixel up, but before I had time to grab her the other dog was on her. It basically flipped her over, she was on her back screaming and the other dog had its whole mouth around her. How she escaped without bite marks I have no idea, but she was covered in saliva so I know she was in the other dog's mouth. The other dog didn't growl or bark or show any warning signs, it just ran at Pixel as soon as it saw her.

    My hubby told me as well that it's very strange that there are no bite marks on Pixel, and I agree. But if the other dog was just playing, why didn't go through the whole sniff and circle routine?

    Pixel has been very distressed since we got home, and very clingy and needy. But there are no marks on her.

    Reporting it as a dangerous dog wouldn't make it be put down, unless it has been reported previously. In our council area, dangerous dogs get a special collar and have to wear a muzzle in public. I would feel a lot safer knowing the dog had to wear a muzzle. They live 200 metres up the road from us.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Canberra
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    In all seriousness you are going to report this???????

    Your dog is unharmed, you are unharmed, I think you need to take a step back before you do anything.

    Your first post says your dog was attacked, yet your second post says there are no bite marks.

    Your dog is probably 'feeling needy' because you are and you are transmitting that onto your dog.

    I think you just need to let this go, watch out for the dog and don't go any where near it. Speak to the parent of the child when you are calm and ask to meet the dog, maybe then you can make an informed decision, before labeling this dog.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Brisbane
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    Default

    So no injuries = no attack?? Despite my dog being inside the other dog's mouth, on her back, screaming?? It was pure luck that she wasn't killed, had the other dog decided to bite down we would be at the emergency vet's sowing her up right now, if not burying her.

    So if some guy walks up to hubby and punches him in the face, but doesn't break any bones or puncture the skin, it's not assault and we can't report it to the police?

    I don't understand that logic. My dog was attacked, but was lucky enough to escape without injuries.

    And no, I am not transmitting it onto my dog, we went out shortly after and only returned about 30 minutes ago, and since then Pixel has been on my lap shivering. I had already calmed down by the time we got back.

  8. #8

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    If (and when - our first proper, vaccinated walk is tomorrow, but my bouncing horse-puppy of a bull arab will probably be the perpetrator knowing my luck!) it happens to me, I'll read the dog owner the riot act, but unless I feel the dog in question was genuinely not controlled I wouldn't be reporting it to the authorities.

    It's my view that young children should never be permitted to walk dogs, unsupervised - as proven in this confrontation, they don't have the power or weight to control a larger dog, and if it's a smaller dog they can't defend it from attack by a larger dog. I'd have read the owner of the other dog the riot act - it may not have happened before, but the dog is probably usually walked by an adult, who can control any dominance issues and turn confrontations like that into controlled first meetings.

  9. #9

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    If a dog that much larger than yours had your dog in his mouth without your dog being injured then I would say the dog was not seriously attacking it... If the dog was serious no way you would have been able to get it away from the larger dog without help... and if it was dangerous it wouldnt have just let go... I would speak to the parents when all is calm again, and suggest that the children not be allowed to walk the dog.... If you are worried about your dog you should see a vet... otherwise no harm done... it may have been playing with your dog... mine get covered in saliva when playing...

  10. #10

    Default

    I'm glad the father of the boy understands the need for the dog to be walked by an adult now.
    That's a great outcome. I'd let it go

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