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Thread: How to train a dog to be ok alone outside

  1. #1

    Default How to train a dog to be ok alone outside

    I’ve recently adopted a 4year old staffy and he has a great nature, he has suffered from bad separation anxiety and I have had to medicate him. Due to the anxiety he cannot stay inside when I go to work and I don’t work in the hrs that doggy daycare operates so he has to stay outside. Can anyone give me some tips on how to help him be ok with being long for up to 5hrs at a time.

    My work days are often 9 hrs however I can come home for an hour in the middle.

    Thank you in advance


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    Last edited by Harry and Hailee; 12-05-2017 at 09:56 AM.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry and Hailee View Post
    I’ve recently adopted a 4year old staffy and he has a great nature, he has suffered from bad separation anxiety and I have had to medicate him. Due to the anxiety he cannot stay inside when I go to work and I don’t work in the hrs that doggy daycare operates so he has to stay outside. Can anyone give me some tips on how to help him be ok with being long for up to 5hrs at a time.
    My work days are often 9 hrs however I can come home for an hour in the middle.
    Thank you in advance Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Is this a carry on from your previous thread – or a new one ? The only real difference I can see is that you are now ‘medicating’ your pup !

    I gave you links and information that answers your questions about training your pup to be comfortable at home by himself. Did you actually have a look and read any of them ?

    Kikopup’s video – Home Alone’ - is not a quick fix – but it works.

    Now that your pup is ‘medicated’ – this is the perfect/best time to be joining a ‘Dog School’ and look at doing a lot of training with your pup yourself when you are home with your pup.

    You are trying to change your pup’s way of thinking with these drugs. Don’t waste your money – expecting that these drugs to be a ‘magic potion’ and that you don’t need to do anything at all - other than giving the drugs ! That is just so far from the truth ! These drugs don’t work that way !

    In your previous thread – I also alluded to ‘crate training’.

    Kikopup’s crate training videos are excellent. I would suggest you do this with your pup. 5 hours in a crate would be easily handled by a 4 year old pup – toileting wise. The only proviso is that your pup is happy being in the crate. Also - The only way to achieve this is by training your pup to love the crate. It becomes their safe place – so make sure it is comfortable for him.

    Another thing I would like to stress is - that you have only had this pup for ~ 1 month. It is still early days.

    The boy I have now - Riley – who (hopefully) will turn 11 in February next year – came to my place as a PITA 2 year old de-sexed GSP ! He was an absolute nightmare – but my little 9 year old GSP girl loved him at first sight. She was grieving very badly for the boy we lost 6 months before. Because of Riley being here – I was able to have another 2 ½ precious years with her.

    So Riley came home with us. It took him 6 months before he trusted me and decided that where he was – was forever !

    Training with love, kindness, patience - with heaps of repetition and fantastic treats and a sense of humour works well with these pups. Keep training sessions short and often.

    If you are losing your cool with the pup – then you need to step back, walk away and work out what you did wrong in a particular training session or encounter.

    Assuming that pups instinctively know what you want – is the wrong way to look at things. They can’t read your mind ! But a real big problem with these pups is – Pups can read your ‘Body Language’ better than any human can.

    Pups need boundaries, routines and rules – so they know what you want them to do. The only way to achieve this is by training your pup !

    Another question – What are you actually feeding your pup on a daily basis ? Diet does affect behaviour.

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=d...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    A few more things to think about and look at !

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    Is this a carry on from your previous thread – or a new one ? The only real difference I can see is that you are now ‘medicating’ your pup !

    I gave you links and information that answers your questions about training your pup to be comfortable at home by himself. Did you actually have a look and read any of them ?

    Kikopup’s video – Home Alone’ - is not a quick fix – but it works.

    Now that your pup is ‘medicated’ – this is the perfect/best time to be joining a ‘Dog School’ and look at doing a lot of training with your pup yourself when you are home with your pup.

    You are trying to change your pup’s way of thinking with these drugs. Don’t waste your money – expecting that these drugs to be a ‘magic potion’ and that you don’t need to do anything at all - other than giving the drugs ! That is just so far from the truth ! These drugs don’t work that way !

    In your previous thread – I also alluded to ‘crate training’.

    Kikopup’s crate training videos are excellent. I would suggest you do this with your pup. 5 hours in a crate would be easily handled by a 4 year old pup – toileting wise. The only proviso is that your pup is happy being in the crate. Also - The only way to achieve this is by training your pup to love the crate. It becomes their safe place – so make sure it is comfortable for him.

    Another thing I would like to stress is - that you have only had this pup for ~ 1 month. It is still early days.

    The boy I have now - Riley – who (hopefully) will turn 11 in February next year – came to my place as a PITA 2 year old de-sexed GSP ! He was an absolute nightmare – but my little 9 year old GSP girl loved him at first sight. She was grieving very badly for the boy we lost 6 months before. Because of Riley being here – I was able to have another 2 ½ precious years with her.

    So Riley came home with us. It took him 6 months before he trusted me and decided that where he was – was forever !

    Training with love, kindness, patience - with heaps of repetition and fantastic treats and a sense of humour works well with these pups. Keep training sessions short and often.

    If you are losing your cool with the pup – then you need to step back, walk away and work out what you did wrong in a particular training session or encounter.

    Assuming that pups instinctively know what you want – is the wrong way to look at things. They can’t read your mind ! But a real big problem with these pups is – Pups can read your ‘Body Language’ better than any human can.

    Pups need boundaries, routines and rules – so they know what you want them to do. The only way to achieve this is by training your pup !

    Another question – What are you actually feeding your pup on a daily basis ? Diet does affect behaviour.

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=d...hrome&ie=UTF-8

    A few more things to think about and look at !
    Hi, this post was to gain more help. I did look at the links and ideas that you gave me in the last post.
    The choice to medicate my boy was not to ultra is behaviour but to balance his emotion. I am a psychologist who is well versed in anxiety and depression. We have joined a dog school and he has been going to doggy day care however I do have limited money and these things are eating though my savings.
    My choice to medicate my boy came from being called home because he was hurting himself while he was left alone for an hour. It is not just his sanity that I am trying to keep together but also mine.
    My vet and also the dog school/daycare that he is going to have recommended not to crate train him as small spaces scare him rather than make him feel safe. I have him booked into a behavioural therapist in the new year as this was the only time that I could get him in.
    My dog has a routine that we stick to everyday whether I am working on it be the weekend and he is fed at the same time each day, in these feeds he has a mixture of vegetables, meat and rice and I am trying to find some dry food to mix in that he will actually eat. He also has bones when he is in the yard. He also walks at least 5kms every morning with me.


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  4. #4
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    You mention "outside" in the post subject. Is there any reason why you wouldn't be able to give him access to the house while you're out? I find this can greatly reduce anxiety separation issue and other problem behaviours.

    If you're in a rental and can't install a permanent dog door, there's the sliding door inserts you can get (try Gumtree first as they're quite expensive new) which you'll be able to reuse in most places you rent or buy. This really would be the first "fix' I'd try.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    You mention "outside" in the post subject. Is there any reason why you wouldn't be able to give him access to the house while you're out? I find this can greatly reduce anxiety separation issue and other problem behaviours.

    If you're in a rental and can't install a permanent dog door, there's the sliding door inserts you can get (try Gumtree first as they're quite expensive new) which you'll be able to reuse in most places you rent or buy. This really would be the first "fix' I'd try.
    He has become destructive when left alone with access to the house even for ten minutes. That was before medication however. I have brand new furniture that I don’t want him to have access to when I am not around and there is no way to keep him out of those rooms if he had access to the house


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  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Canberra
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    I'm sorry,. I didn't read your post properly. I'm a bit distracted today.

    It sounds like you may need help from a behaviourist trainer. But only use one that comes recommended.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Southern NSW
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    You were given some great Ideas by RileyJ

    Staffy and anxiety are a very common problem.... I think it is actually from bad Breeding... its in many lines. They are either the super cool little dude or the anxious one

    I think early days it might be required to find a "dog minder".... until you can give the dog more confidence at home and being OK with short period alone. Now shutting it out will only make things worse.
    this can only be done in baby steps and maybe finding a Dog behaviour trainer would help
    Pets are forever

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