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Thread: Barking Collars

  1. #1

    Default Barking Collars

    To cut the long story short, we've got an extremely difficult neighbour who will not tolerate even the slightest barking (during the day time) and have threatened to complain to council. He insist that we should train our 6 month old dog to stop barking simply by telling him or failing which smack him until he stops. I would like to hear from personal experience whether barking collars work and which are the best ones, ie electronic, citronella, ultrasonic, etc. Any brand recommendation? Thanks.
    Last edited by BennyTheBall; 12-19-2016 at 11:15 AM.

  2. #2

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    What kind of dog?
    Well, they can complain but simply put if your dog is not barking an unreasonable amount the council isn't likely to do anything. Is it constant barking for hours on end or is it the odd bark at something in the tree every few hours?

    What is causing the barking? If you can remove the cause (at least from sight), you can hopefully reduce the barking. Your neighbour will have to accept that sometimes dogs bark and it will not be silent 24/7.

    I've heard more horror stories about barking collars then good news*, ranging from "didn't do anything" to "dog started pissing in fear all the time".

    *Personally I actually haven't heard any good news out of it. But if I went for any I'd go for citronella.

    Other things to try out:

    - is it boredom barking? 6 months old is coming up on the terrible teenager months. Puzzle games when left at home + regular walks? Can't bark if you have a roo tail in your mouth or nosing a kong around
    - is the barking only in one location i.e. backyard? Could you give access to the laundry when you're not home so dog will settle down and sleep?
    - can they see out of the yard? Screening it off can both reduce visual stimulation and muffle sounds.
    - vet check to make sure there's no health cause could be in order, + making sure he's growing all right.
    - training games where you randomly reward the dog throughout the day for being quiet. Like say if someone walks past the house and he only looks up, give him a treat. Treats for laying in bed, treats for being calm

    Here is a video on teaching a dog how to be calm:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wesm2OpE_2c

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Canberra
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    Also, allowing the dog access to the house when you are out can reduce barking, I find. You may find some mess in the house when you get home, but I always found it worth that.

    Other than that, ThistleTheDog's reply is really good.

  4. #4

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    Thought I'll spare everyone the the long story but here it is if you're interested. 6mth old Std Labradoodle currently living with us indoors. He hardly ever bark except for the occasional playful bark outside when we're playing with him. As he's getting a little too big to confine him to the laundry (where he sleeps at night), we decided to build an outdoor covered fully self contained 3x5m enclosure adjoining the house for him. Even though I didn't have to, I discussed our building plans with said neighbour who did not appear to be too enthusiastic. Now that it's done, I spoke to him and told him about transitioning our dog to the outside and to please excuse some expected short term barking until he gets used to the new environment. I apologised for any inconvenience that may possibly cause and told him I would start late morning weekday. Barely 15 mins into it, he came knocking on the door and issued the threats so it was game over. Now all this is causing a lot of stress to my family and is particularly upsetting because we have been good neighbours past 4 years and have never had any problems. We have had them over for meals, and while they were away looked after their house, cleaned and looked after their pool and garden, swept their driveway, took out their rubbish, cleared their letterbox, helped him with his boat, took him out on my boat (and not expecting any contribution to cost), etc, etc. Now we don't want any bad blood and we get along great with ALL neighbours on the street, having taken the initiative to organised regular get-togethers for everyone. Like I said, this is particularly upsetting. How do you respond to someone who accuses you of not training your dog by smacking him until he stops barking?
    Last edited by BennyTheBall; 12-19-2016 at 09:53 PM.

  5. #5

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    Honestly it sounds like your neighbour is being an unreasonable stick in the mud for no particular reason. You're not doing anything wrong and neither is your dog. They could just not like dogs or dogs barking no matter how infrequent.

    I'd stick to something simple response wise like "thank you for your advice, we are working on training our dog and appreciate your patience"

    You don't need to hit the dog or punish it when it's not exactly doing anything wrong but the odd bark. It is a dog. It will bark. Even rare barkers like yours and mine. Your game plan to introduce it to the yard seems really thought out and reasonable. You're really not doing anything wrong, I think you should get a gold star for being so communicative!

    There's nothing council report worthy there, your neighbour is making empty threats.

    I'd advoid bringing up the dog in conversation to them, it does look like they're looking for anything to argue about with the dog versus an actual barking problem.

    Sorry it's happening
    Last edited by ThistleTheDog; 12-19-2016 at 02:11 PM.

  6. #6

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    We've introduced the dog to the enclosure gradually over the past few days by allowing him to get in and out and playing/feeding him inside. He's pretty happy with his new home except that he will bark once we leave him in there on his own for more than a few minutes. I think that's natural and should stop after a while when he doesn't get what he wants which is our attention and to be let out. I will never smack him for barking especially in this situation as most reasonably dog owners would agree that's not going to help. Neighbour's always been a very difficult person (and his wife warned us when we first moved in) but we've made the effort to get along with him but I'm afraid this is the straw that breaks the camel. I still need to get around problem and introduce doggie into his new home but problem is he'll bark again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Ignore your neighbour if you can and be rigidly polite as already suggested. You cannot win with someone like this and they thrive on power. You are doing everything right, I can imagine how stressful this is for you and so unnecessary.

  8. #8

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    You didn’t mention how old your ‘Problem Neighbour’ is ! These days he could be very young – not so young - or - also oldish or very old !

    Manners and common sense seem to not be apparent now-a-days with most people.

    People can be very set in their minds and ways as to how they think things should go ! PFFTTT – Smacking pups ! What an absolute joke ! What is that going to achieve ? All that will happen is your pup will become scared of you. I am sure you don’t want that to happen !

    But - Remember – that is only his opinion and should not govern the way you do things with your home, your family or your pup !

    I am really interested to hear what this neighbour has ever done for you and your family – other than grizzle about your pup ! You seem to have done so much for him ! Give and take is what life is all about. Looks like this neighbour of yours only likes to take.

    I know you don’t want any ‘bad blood’ with this particular neighbour – but not offering or saying ‘NO’ sometimes – will help !

    Nice people do seem to be taken advantage of far too much ! Maybe it is time to set some boundaries with this particular neighbour ?

    As far as your neighbour threatening you – with this below ! PFFFTT !

    To cut the long story short, we've got an extremely difficult neighbour who will not tolerate even the slightest barking (during the day time) and have threatened to complain to council.
    Looks like I am going to have to say also – FFS ! Pups bark – this is what pups do. That is their way of communicating.

    Instead of looking at some sort of ‘bark collar’ for your pup – I would actually invest in a surveillance camera + sound to actually see what the problem is. Could this neighbour be stirring the pup up ? Is the enclosure on that particular neighbour’s side of your home ?

    Also – Please do some research on what your local council says about ‘barking dogs’. Knowledge is powerful. Threats are not !

    Take care !

  9. #9

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    He's probably in his 40's, always home because he's been out of job for 2 years now. Yeah it's on his side of the house and he did say that we should have put it on the other side which is totally impractical as his side is where our laundry and services are. Besides it is our prerogative. Good suggestion on the research though, I'll get a little more info from the council. Thanks. Any feedback from anyone on bark collars?
    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    You didn’t mention how old your ‘Problem Neighbour’ is ! These days he could be very young – not so young - or - also oldish or very old !

    Manners and common sense seem to not be apparent now-a-days with most people.

    People can be very set in their minds and ways as to how they think things should go ! PFFTTT – Smacking pups ! What an absolute joke ! What is that going to achieve ? All that will happen is your pup will become scared of you. I am sure you don’t want that to happen !

    But - Remember – that is only his opinion and should not govern the way you do things with your home, your family or your pup !

    I am really interested to hear what this neighbour has ever done for you and your family – other than grizzle about your pup ! You seem to have done so much for him ! Give and take is what life is all about. Looks like this neighbour of yours only likes to take.

    I know you don’t want any ‘bad blood’ with this particular neighbour – but not offering or saying ‘NO’ sometimes – will help !

    Nice people do seem to be taken advantage of far too much ! Maybe it is time to set some boundaries with this particular neighbour ?

    As far as your neighbour threatening you – with this below ! PFFFTT !



    Looks like I am going to have to say also – FFS ! Pups bark – this is what pups do. That is their way of communicating.

    Instead of looking at some sort of ‘bark collar’ for your pup – I would actually invest in a surveillance camera + sound to actually see what the problem is. Could this neighbour be stirring the pup up ? Is the enclosure on that particular neighbour’s side of your home ?

    Also – Please do some research on what your local council says about ‘barking dogs’. Knowledge is powerful. Threats are not !

    Take care !
    Last edited by BennyTheBall; 12-19-2016 at 09:50 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Make him watch this video... (it's a bit over 36 minutes long, but offer to smack him or hose him any time he gets up or complains - that should make a point).

    warning there are some ugly old school training in this.
    https://youtu.be/OIjMBfhyNDE

    punishment doesn't work. Your neighbour is punishing you for not punishing the dog. Be careful how you reward his behaviour too.

    And also if the run is near the neighbour's fence - the neighbour may actually do stuff that aggravates the barking. You can't win with that. But a camera on your yard with sound recording can help the council understand who the real problem is.

    In this situation - I don't think the bark collar has a chance of working.

    But what you can do is take your dog for a 30 minute walk and do 5 mins of trick training, start with bark on cue maybe - then you can train for quiet too. Trick training wears their brains out, and then leave him in the house (in a crate if he's prone to chewing things) until you get home. Do not greet him when you get home until you've been outside together and he's done a pitstop.

    A lot of people love it when their dogs go crazy when they get home - it's nice to be wanted but it's not good for neighbours or keeping your work clothes nice. And you can do all that after you've got changed...

    Do a bit more trick training and maybe another walk. If you play fetch with your dog make him do a trick before each throw and also retrieve the ball back to your hand... don't keep throwing if he doesn't fetch properly. My fave trick before throwing, is a sit facing the direction I want to throw, so my dog can't twist her self an injury spinning around to chase the ball.

    My dog just sleeps when I'm out. But I do take her for a walk in the morning and do some trick training on the walk.

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