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Thread: Lure coursing?

  1. #1
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    Default Lure coursing?

    Took Finn to the Dogs Victoria big day out for dogs + canine Christmas market last weekend. Was a great day all around... (no poo accidents too )

    We went over to watch the lure coursing for a little while and Finn was completely fascinated by it!!

    We were on the other side of the fence, probably at least 20m from where the dogs and lures actually were. Finn was watching so focused on everything that was going on, taking it all in! Every time the lure went around closest to us, Finn got super excited and so desperately wanted to run after it!

    Lure coursing is something I've never given a second thought about but now having seen Finn's reaction to it (and it does look like good fun!) I'm thinking it would be a great activity for him that he'd have an absolute blast doing!

    I do have concerns though... I don't want to encourage him chasing small animals like cats... At the moment he's generally good with cats, but if one ran fast near him, I'm not sure what he would do.

    So considering I don't really want to encourage him chasing small animals... I'm assuming that lure coursing is probably something I should be avoiding, even though I think he'd have an absolute blast doing it!

    What are your thoughts on this?

  2. #2
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    Mmm yep, the more reading I do on google about this the more I'm thinking I'll stay away from lure coursing.... Bit of a shame, but I'm thinking probably best option all around.

  3. #3

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    I imagine it would make some set backs in fast moving critter impulse control but you could counteract by working on cat counter conditioning? My understanding is dogs who course are well aware it's just a bag or rag. And if he's only allowed to do it in a specific place and location?

    But could also bleed through. I'm sure he'd make for lovely coursing photos. Not much difference to chasing a ball or flirt pole id think?

    With luck he's a chaser not a catcher for cats :s

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThistleTheDog View Post
    I imagine it would make some set backs in fast moving critter impulse control but you could counteract by working on cat counter conditioning? My understanding is dogs who course are well aware it's just a bag or rag. And if he's only allowed to do it in a specific place and location?

    But could also bleed through. I'm sure he'd make for lovely coursing photos. Not much difference to chasing a ball or flirt pole id think?

    With luck he's a chaser not a catcher for cats :s
    I suppose it's still an option. Maybe I'll email the Rhodesian Ridgeback club (who seem to be the ones who run lure coursing for large dogs in VIC) and voice my interest and concerns about the sport.

    The simple fact that I have 3 cats means I really want to avoid having a dog who's a cat chaser. He already has that tendency if they run fast near him... I just don't know what he'd do if he actually caught up to the fast cat....

    Never ever letting him near my ferrets! Not even going to risk it!

  5. #5
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    sometimes the best way to stop a dog chasing things you don't want - is to put it on cue or set up contexts when it is ok.

    We did some lure coursing in Adelaide - and Frosty did not suddenly start chasing new things or things I'd taught her to leave alone - like remote control cars...

    They know it's not a cat lure. And the lures are very carefully made to be very artificial. Here - they won't even use fake fur. It's usually old tshirts or bags.

  6. #6

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    Please do your homework on this ‘maddogdodge' – but Finn is far too young to be doing something like this.

    He needs to be 18 months old before he can start something like this – just like agility and a few other different sports.

    If this was my pup – I would be waiting until he was 2 years old. It just makes sure all his skeletal growth/development has been completed. You don’t want him having problems with all/any of his joints because of all the twisting and turning involved in luring.

    This is the same reason that none of my pups now will ever chase a moving ball. It is just not worth it for a pup's health.

    I have no problem with luring. It is fun for everyone. Finn would be smart enough to know that he is chasing a plastic bag and not something else. If and when you do it - set him up so that he knows the difference - different collar; different lead; different place; racing jacket and different attitude from you !

    http://ankc.org.au/media/1093/1809lu...ing_2015v2.pdf

    Why not look at getting his ‘Title’ with obedience in the meantime ? He sure has the smarts for it !

  7. #7

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    I don't have any thought about it.

  8. #8
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    I have friends that do it with their dogs and it doesn't seem to cause any unwanted problems.

    RileyJ dogs absolutely can and need to start doing foundation agility when they are young to build up the correct body awareness, balance and positioning and handling on the flat to avoid injuries later on. Foundation work can be done safely. Much safer than running full bore into agility with no foundations when the dog turns 18 months, this is where injuries happen. Most of the top international dogs are competing are in their prime at age 8-10 and you can bet they were started as very young puppies doing the right foundation, handling and conditioning work.

    Sylvia Trkman believes this teaching of agility foundation and proprioception skills to young puppies is the key to a dog better protected from injury. Waiting to start training for agility till 18 months for the average agility type dog really is a myth. That is the age that you are allowed to start trialing and running full size courses, not training. One has to be sensible based on the dogs body type and breed and most definitely you need to keep sport dogs lean.

    It is all about understanding the sport and how you need to condition your dog to make it safe. I most certainly start herding with my dogs around 6 months old and start building up duration. My experienced herding and agility dogs are both rising 8 now and in their prime with no issues to speak of. The weekend warrior mentality is the most harmful and research has shown that dogs owned and trained by experienced sport people are less likely to suffer injuries and they all start their dogs young.

    In fact one of our top handlers has a brand new puppy and is about to run an online course for people to watch how she safely raises and trains an agility puppy from scratch. Very pertinent to people with young pups to learn from one of the best.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 03-09-2017 at 12:54 AM.

  9. #9

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    Do you have links to that research? Not doubting you but I'd like to read what exercises and foundations and at what stages they do it.

    Currently was just planning super basic body awareness and confidence work. Walking on wobbly platforms and slow spins. Understanding he has 4 feet. That kinda stuff. I do have a rough exercise guide by Jane killon (sp?)

  10. #10
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    I always found it easier to use a strong drive in your favor. A dog that has a strong drive to chase is much easier to train if you use 'allowing to chase' as a reward. A dog that has been never allowed to chase will just do this when he gets the opportunity - it is an instinct and it won't fade out.

    I started for my dog with a flirt pole, and now I 'use' seagulls as the highest reward (beside sheep herding): on cue she is allowed to chase the seagulls at the beach, if we pass a flock of ducks it is 'leave-it' and she won't even look at them (the ducks can be very slow starters so there would be a good chance that she would catch them). Same with cats and other critters. I can walk her off leash on the beach and she will only chase if I give the cue for it. The whole exercise (includes recalls), is a regular part in her training.

    wrt luring: it won't spark anything in the dog that isn't already there, and IMO it is always better to allow such a drive to happen in a controlled environment. It is an instinct, not a learned behaviour, and suppressing it will make it much more likely to cause some imbalance in the dog.

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