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Thread: HELP! How do you get your dog to listen to you?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
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    Geelong
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    Default HELP! How do you get your dog to listen to you?

    Hi Everyone,
    I've got a Parson Russell Terrier, he is 2 years old. we got him a year ago from Sydney where he lived with an old lady, he grew up around females, horses, cows, dogs, all females. then we got him careered over to Geelong.

    He has been with us for a year learnt that my dad is the boss. A parsons russell if you don't know is a hunting dog , he is basically a jack russell but has got longer legs, we want him to hunt, we are taking him to places where there a lots of rabbits so he can chase him, we are hoping he will catch one eventually. i am the person who spends the most time with him, the person who gives him baths, dinner, toys, treats.

    I go for walks with him often on a we walk him on a open track which is on the top of a hill, there is a slope which goes down to a highway. A while ago we only started taking him off leash. When my dad calls him to come back, he comes, but when i call him to come back its another story, he would ignore me and walk off.

    Today i let him off the leash and called his name so he comes but i only got the same response as every other time, and to be honest i am getting sick of it. right along the patch the path there a a fence that runs beside it with about 20 meters of land between them. the fence is the usual farming fence where there's the posts with a wires going horizontal all along.

    my dog decided to go under the fence and starts going through the bushes going down the slope to the highway and i started to get worried and scared that he might get run over. i ran to the bottom right beside the highway and managed to catch him and put him back on leash.

    i don't want to risk it again. i want him to listen to me and for him not to ignore me anymore, i want to be able to trust him. i would love to get some tips or at least some help on how this problem can be solved. it would be very appreciated! if there's any other information you need about the problem don't be afraid to ask C:

    Thanks,
    Kristina
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 09-18-2016 at 10:07 PM. Reason: put some spaces in so I can read it.

  2. #2
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    but when i call him to come back its another story, he would ignore me and walk off.
    You might want to get a dvd called "really reliable recall" by Leslie Nelson. She taught afghan hounds to recall - classically conditioned, so they just come back - they never think about whether it's worth it or not - that bit of the brain gets bypassed.

    Essentially it involves three training sessions a day where you call the dog when it's already coming to you and you're sure it will arrive... and then dish out treats and praise for 30 seconds (which is a really long time - part of the trick is to slow the treats down enough that the dog only gets a little bit at a time)...

    You have a special word for that recall - I use "C'mon" - said the same way that Leyton H says it when he needs some help with his tennis match.

    Some people use the word "here" or "free beer" (might get more than the dog yelling that)...

    And at home - where you have control - practice recalls (with lots of pats and praise and maybe treats). When the dog ALWAYS comes to you at home - then it might be safe to try somewhere with more distractions and less control. You have a different word for ordinary round the house recalls.

    Then when you're out, maybe have a long line with knots in it... to practice in a place with slightly more distractions. so you still have control.

    Also play hide and seek (start in the house, then in the back yard...) you hide (level 1 of this game - you curl up on the floor and put your head under your arms and reward and praise your dog for investigating. Don't use a recall word - but you can squeak... practice this once a day for a week and if he's coming every time - then you can start using a word... And then you can upgrade it to hiding behind a door and squeaking etc. And then in the back yard - hide behind a tree.

    With my dog - if I chased her - she'd run away. So I'd have to run the other way - squeaking sometimes - to get her to chase me. So practice some games where your dog chases you and gets a hidden toy when he catches up to you. Tug toys would be good for this - I make them by plaiting up old tshirt cut into strips. They don't last long but they're cheap.

  3. #3
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    Geelong
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    thankyou! very appreciated C:

  4. #4
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    Leslie Nelson is awesome.... I also do a version which is go on fun walks and again everytime the dog initially comes near me, treat it... I start this with my puppies. I use there name and treat. I can do this up to twenty times a walk and they love it. The recall to name in my case is just automated, they cannot help it... never in an angry voice and always happy... it is also the letting them go many times. so many times we recall them only to lock them up or go home. So I will even go back to the car and let them go again. they have no idea when the final call will come. And when we are still learning I am very careful not to call them when they are busy, because that would mean a call and they don't come. I have great helpers, my other dogs who yo yo to and fro to me and show any new dog how great coming in is.....never ever be angry when they come, even if it has taken ages as sometimes happen with a rescue dog... Make it a party when they do come and give those awesome rewards. I can call my own dogs out of a full on rabbit chase........except for my most recent rescue, who still worries, but he comes, in a round about way and is getting better. Keep at it and keep happy
    Pets are forever

  5. #5
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    I always teach my new foster dogs recall using pretty much the method Hyacinth described, though we mainly practice on walks. I call them very often and make it very easy to start with. I actually start off with giving them treats for coming to me on walks without me giving any cue. So they just come for a treat whenever they want at first. Then progress to calling ("adding the cue") when they cruise over. It takes me a long time before I call them when they are in any way distracted and there's a chance they may not come. You want to avoid mistakes, like with all dog training really.

    I'm currently training a foster dog that we're adopting. And after doing those first steps for a few weeks, today I got some higher value treats (I normally use tiny bits of Schmackos straps, today I also took a dog roll cut into little cubes) and only called when there was some sort of a distraction and rewarded with the higher value treats if he came immediately (and the lesser value treats if he took his time or if it was an easy recall). Distractions today went from the dog sniffing an exciting smell, to running towards an exciting smell to chasing ducks (his biggest weakness so far). I normally only give one or two treats (I don't know if that matters, really?) so I gave him a jackpot (as in: nearly half the bag of dog roll cubes) when he came when he was running after the ducks.

    I do also regularly hide on walks, but find that works better with some dogs than with others.

    And I've no idea how similar a Parson Russel Terrier is to a Jack Russel, but when I was fostering one of the latter, I had to leave the long lead on him pretty much always on walks because he was very prone to just go and do his own thing without caring where I was. And him being so low to the ground, it was too hard to catch him if he didn't want to be caught. Stepping on the long lead is a very good way to stop a dog in his tracks! They also learn that when they feel the lead dragging behind them, it's not much use trying to outsmart the human that controls it. I used to worry about him getting snagged, but that only happened once and because he was on a harness, he was perfectly fine. I would not use a long lead like that with a collar though.

    Clicker training is a good way to strengthen the bond between you and your dog too. And it makes them way more keen to work for rewards.

    The key is to accept that reliable recall training takes lots of patience and lots of time. You can get the dog to come to you when there's no distractions in no time. But to get them to choose you (and your rewards) over things like wildlife or a food source is a long process. But so very, very worth it. A dog with reliable recall is the best team mate you could ever wish for.

    This is the article that gave me an aha moment when I trained my older dog recall a few years ago: http://www.kathysdao.com/articles/th...liable-recall/

  6. #6

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    You have been given a lot of really good ideas and information from the posts above.

    Teaching recall takes time and heaps of practise and patience. As your pup is just 2 years old – you really need to start off from scratch again.

    Have you heard of the ‘terrible 2s’ in pups ? Well that is where your boy is at ! Your pup loves going for a run and has worked out you can’t catch him !

    ‘Out there’ is far more interesting than what you are to him !

    Time to turn this around ! No more freedom for him until he learns the rules ! What sort of other training have you done with him ?

    Start your training in the house with the lowest distraction rate and build up slowly from there.

    Look at buying or making a ‘Treat Pouch’ and tie it around your waist. Fill it with high level treats and practise again and again ...........

    LOL – they used to be called ‘bum bags’ in my day !

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=t...n1DQYQ_AUIBygC

    Also, look at getting a long line lead and attach it to your treat pouch at your waist - the length is up to you. That way you are hands free.

    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=l...YTDooQ_AUIBigB

    Good Luck and let us know how you 2 get on !

  7. #7

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    We both have the same situation before, until I find some expert to help me with this kind of behaviour. With the help of the proper training his behaviour improved and always listen to my any command with a treats in my hand.

  8. #8

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    I have a similar issue, when we got our BC at 3 months she was actually really good at recall and not bad at listening to me. Now at 8 months, I think she sees me more of a friend then a master.. so she only does what I say when she feels like it. She's also very easily distracted.. ;-; makes training hard. Its not that she doesn't try though.. I also find using food hard, she gets too excited and starts jumping up on me to get the treats rather than listening and doing as shes told.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vitsyra View Post
    I have a similar issue, when we got our BC at 3 months she was actually really good at recall and not bad at listening to me. Now at 8 months, I think she sees me more of a friend then a master.. so she only does what I say when she feels like it. She's also very easily distracted.. ;-; makes training hard. Its not that she doesn't try though.. I also find using food hard, she gets too excited and starts jumping up on me to get the treats rather than listening and doing as shes told.
    Normal teenage behaviour, keep your temper ( challenging I know, they pick that time when you are on a time limit to stuff around). Hide and seek worked very well with Maggie. If she failed to come I would turn my back to her and either sit down or walk to a vantage spot and ignored her. Took time but worth it. I watched a woman at the beach last week chasing her dog calling. I had to bite my tongue, wanted to give her some pointers. I Really felt for her.
    Last edited by farrview; 12-16-2016 at 06:05 PM.

  10. #10
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    Three month old puppies are always easy to manage in that regard. They naturallyv want to stay close to their human for protection and that's why they come when you call them.

    Training recall takes lots of time. And you need very good rewards. Your dog being excited about food is exactly what you want. To prevent her from jumping up to get the treats, use a treat bag. Your can move it to your back, out of reach. And use a clicker, which will allow you time to get a treat out of the bag while still letting the dog know exactly what she did to deserve that reward.

    Training recall is 99% repetition and 1% skill. Call your dog when she's already coming towards you at first, give awesome treats every time, then gradually introduce harder recalls and reserve the best rewards for those.

    The key is to only call her when you're very sure she will come.

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