Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: Aggression towards other dogs.

  1. #21

    Default

    The other comment was right! Before we are both the same situation but because of the help of a good trainer and behaviourist, my dog matured now and he know now what good and bad.

  2. #22

    Default

    Its had been a while since we had the young dog other than a quick visit, this last week however, we have been looking after him continuously while his owner is moving house.
    Because our yard is not secure, I have had him chained up in the patio beside the back door. He is a strange dog this boy, having owned a Blue heeler previously, he is nothing like my last boy. He is very content to sit/sleep on his chain, no barking or any bad behavior of any kind, the perfect dog in many respects. He does spend time doing what looks like sucking the cushion on his bed and almost kneading with his paws. We take him with us where ever we go and are lucky to have some wide pen space close by so that he can exercise without the fear of crossing other dogs.

    When I picked him up at the beginning of the week, if while in the car we passed a dog, he went absolutely crazy, tried to launch himself through the window at it. I in turn raged at him (nothing physical) other than grabbing his collar and forcefully pulling his head down so that he couldn't see the dog, but lots of aggressive verbal disapproval from me. This continued for a couple of days of driving past other dogs, but now I can approach other dogs (still while in the car) and I sternly tell him to not even think about it in very aggressive tone and he will not respond at all, he wants to, but doesn't. Today while driving along the beach we passed two large dogs and again the stern voice and he just watched them without responding.

    I'm under no illusion that its early days with him. During the week I got complacent with him with what could have been a tragic outcome. He has been so good in the yard chained up that when I am working in the back yard I have him with me on a lead, well I was in the shed at the very rear of my house with just a partial view of the footpath at the other end of the block. I had him off the lead with me in the shed, somehow he saw a young lady pass by with a dog and he was off after it, latched onto its rear end, scared the life out of the dog, the owner and me. 100% my fault, no damage was done or at least appeared to be done but I felt very deflated about what could have happened and my part in it.

    Unfortunately his owner has almost completed moving and he will be out of our care again.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,452

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talon View Post
    He does spend time doing what looks like sucking the cushion on his bed and almost kneading with his paws. We take him with us where ever we go and are lucky to have some wide pen space close by so that he can exercise without the fear of crossing other dogs.

    When I picked him up at the beginning of the week, if while in the car we passed a dog, he went absolutely crazy, tried to launch himself through the window at it. I in turn raged at him (nothing physical) other than grabbing his collar and forcefully pulling his head down so that he couldn't see the dog, but lots of aggressive verbal disapproval from me. This continued for a couple of days of driving past other dogs, but now I can approach other dogs (still while in the car) and I sternly tell him to not even think about it in very aggressive tone and he will not respond at all, he wants to, but doesn't. Today while driving along the beach we passed two large dogs and again the stern voice and he just watched them without responding.

    I'm under no illusion that its early days with him. During the week I got complacent with him with what could have been a tragic outcome. He has been so good in the yard chained up that when I am working in the back yard I have him with me on a lead, well I was in the shed at the very rear of my house with just a partial view of the footpath at the other end of the block. I had him off the lead with me in the shed, somehow he saw a young lady pass by with a dog and he was off after it, latched onto its rear end, scared the life out of the dog, the owner and me. 100% my fault, no damage was done or at least appeared to be done but I felt very deflated about what could have happened and my part in it.

    Unfortunately his owner has almost completed moving and he will be out of our care again.
    The sucking and kneading on the cushion is his way of relieving stress, he is in a permanent state of anxiety. I have had a dog like you describe and she did this a lot of the time.

    Your actions are actually totally unsuitable for a dog like this. All you have done is stopped him from any form of warning that he is going to do something and reinforced that other dogs are bad due to your reaction. You have used aggression to try and deal with aggression with a major fail.

    With a dog like this it takes a lot of time to actually try and calm him and rewire his way of thinking. There are a number of techniques and none of them involve aggression on your part, this just reinforces his fears and does nothing to train him. A dog like this needs to be calm and under threshold, he needs to learn that he can look at other dogs and then defer to you and walk on by. He needs desensitization and reward and possibly even a low dose of anxiety medication in the early days.

    You know he is reactive so why was he able to get at another dog? He needs to be kept secure from those sorts of surprises.

    I worked daily with my very reactive dog, patiently taking her to places, keeping her under threshold and rewarding her. You nee 360 vision. I taught her a very good heel with the help of clicker and rewards and rewarded her heavily for looking at other dogs and strangers (she was both people and dog reactive)and then heeling back with me. I remember I had her in a dark garage getting her out of a car when 3 kids suddenly appeared out of nowhere to ask to get their ball. It frightened the heck out of both of us but our training kicked in and she was quickly under control. Before she would have gone ballistic and chased them. There was ongoing management and training but doing what you described that you are doing would have turned her into a ticking time bomb. Yes I used a stern voice at times but mainly it was about teaching and rewarding calm and appropriate behaviour. She was what a behaviourist described to me as an extreme dog, but we made lots of headway.

    Seriously this type of dog needs the help of a good professional up first to coach the owner in the correct techniques and assess the dog or none of this will resolve. I know this as I have owned one.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-16-2016 at 05:00 PM.

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalacreek View Post

    Seriously this type of dog needs the help of a good professional up first to coach the owner in the correct techniques and assess the dog or none of this will resolve. I know this as I have owned one.
    Sadly I feel this dogs fate is out of my hands, those resources are not readily available to the owner and time and commitment to the dog will be limited. I don't have him regularly enough to have any positive influence and can't have him going crazy in the car while I'm driving. I will make him secure and comfortable on his visits here but keep him confined to the yard.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,452

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by talon View Post
    Sadly I feel this dogs fate is out of my hands, those resources are not readily available to the owner and time and commitment to the dog will be limited. I don't have him regularly enough to have any positive influence and can't have him going crazy in the car while I'm driving. I will make him secure and comfortable on his visits here but keep him confined to the yard.
    Yes sounds like all you can do. Pretty sad for all concerned, both the dog and the owners. These types of dogs are hard work and quite often there is a genetic component to the dogs behaviour and modification is often required which takes dedication and there is no real quick fix.

    They were not readily available to me either like 900 km round trip to get advice and so it requires a lot of commitment and sacrifice. I spent a lot of time doing it on my own and reading etc. Yeah a lot of people wouldn't do that and I often found myself questioning my sanity.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •