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Thread: Jumping Great Dane!

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Jumping Great Dane!

    A close friend of mine has a 13 month old female great dane. My friend is having some troubles with her though. When the dog is inside she's usually pretty well behaved, but apparently when she's outside she just goes absolutely insane and jumps up and bites, totally knocking anyone who tries to be around her over!
    My friend says that she tries to discipline the dog but the dog is too big and powerful for her to control without getting knocked over and hurt (i mean... over 50kg of dog knocking you to the ground must hurt a lot!). She really doesn't know what to do, has anyone got any advice i could pass on to her? it would be greatly appreciated!!!
    Last edited by maddogdodge; 02-19-2013 at 05:45 PM.

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    Sounds like Banjo when she was younger
    I found it really quite hard to deal with that behaviour. Because she seemed to regard most things I did to try stop her as encouragement. Especially trying to grab her or yell at her.

    If she starts going nuts when you step into the backyard, I do have a method that worked for us. We used it when walking in through the front door, but I can't see why it would not work for walking out into the back yard.

    You open the door just a tad and wait for a sit, or at least a calm stand. If it takes too long just close the door for a few seconds and try again. When she sits, open the door a bit more, but as soon as she gets up, close door, start again. Do this until you can walk out with her sitting. If she gets up and/or tries to jump, go back in, start again. Banjo was totally out of control when we arrived home and we only had to do this routine for a week to see some great results. If they can get regular visitors to do this too, they'll make good progress.

    Similarly, time out (30Secs in the laundry or example) worked pretty well too. We used this when Banjo wouldn't leave visitors alone and it only took a few times of putting her in the laundry a few times in a row before the one stint was enough to make her behave.

    And Banjo did also grow out of the urge to jump up and go nuts when she got to about 2.

    PS: my then 6yo daughter was able to successfully implement that first method!
    PS2: Didn't stop Banjo randomly jumping up on total strangers when out walking. I had to wait for her to grow out of that and apologise lots
    Last edited by Beloz; 02-19-2013 at 05:50 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Sounds like Banjo when she was younger
    I found it really quite hard to deal with that behaviour. Because she seemed to regard most things I did to try stop her as encouragement. Especially trying to grab her or yell at her.

    If she starts going nuts when you step into the backyard, I do have a method that worked for us. We used it when walking in through the front door, but I can't see why it would not work for walking out into the back yard.

    You open the door just a tad and wait for a sit, or at least a calm stand. If it takes too long just close the door for a few seconds and try again. When she sits, open the door a bit more, but as soon as she gets up, close door, start again. Do this until you can walk out with her sitting. If she gets up and/or tries to jump, go back in, start again. Banjo was totally out of control when we arrived home and we only had to do this routine for a week to see some great results. If they can get regular visitors to do this too, they'll make good progress.

    Similarly, time out (30Secs in the laundry or example) worked pretty well too. We used this when Banjo wouldn't leave visitors alone and it only took a few times of putting her in the laundry a few times in a row before the one stint was enough to make her behave.

    And Banjo did also grow out of the urge to jump up and go nuts when she got to about 2.

    PS: my then 6yo daughter was able to successfully implement that first method!
    PS2: Didn't stop Banjo randomly jumping up on total strangers when out walking. I had to wait for her to grow out of that and apologise lots
    Thanks for that beloz
    that sounds like it would work awesome... but... i just suggested it to my friend and she said that with the design of her house it wouldnt work... cause the only door that leads out to the back goes onto a very high back deck and the dog is very calm on the deck... so its only when someone goes down a bunch of stairs onto the actual grass when she starts to get mental and knock people over...

    Anyone got idea's for that situation?

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    Ah.

    I know that once Banjo gets "into the zone" it seems near impossible to snap her out of that. It works best if I can prevent the behaviour before she goes over threshold.

    What about tying her up to something in that area and walking away every time she tries to jump? Or something similar to LAT training, but I can't quite visualise that one myself.

    Hopefully one of our resident trainers can come up with more useful advice.
    Last edited by Beloz; 02-21-2013 at 08:45 AM.

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    Maybe have some sessions with a local trainer?

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    i dont think they're in a situation at the moment where that is possible

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    Juda was like this. She would get all worked up and excited so easily when she was outside. I found that if she tried to jump up on me I would clap my hands right in front of her face and say "aut" (she responds to that better then "no"). I found the clapping in front of her face startled her as she thought she was hit, and the use of her "bad word" let her know that it was a bad idea to jump up. I used the clap just to startle her and get her attention, because she would get so worked up she wouldn't listen to me. After doing this a few times she learnt not to jump up because the clap in front of her face wasn't nice and she really REALLY doesn't like her bad word.

    Your friend could also try putting her knee up when the dog jump, I've heard that works with rough dogs, even though it sounds a bit mean.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sailmaster View Post
    Juda was like this. She would get all worked up and excited so easily when she was outside. I found that if she tried to jump up on me I would clap my hands right in front of her face and say "aut" (she responds to that better then "no"). I found the clapping in front of her face startled her as she thought she was hit, and the use of her "bad word" let her know that it was a bad idea to jump up. I used the clap just to startle her and get her attention, because she would get so worked up she wouldn't listen to me. After doing this a few times she learnt not to jump up because the clap in front of her face wasn't nice and she really REALLY doesn't like her bad word.

    Your friend could also try putting her knee up when the dog jump, I've heard that works with rough dogs, even though it sounds a bit mean.
    Thanks for that i'll let my friend know about that and see what she says!
    i dont think the knee thing would work... cause the dog is a Great dane... a knee isnt really going to stop her...she can effortlessly put her front paws on peoples shoulders

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    So i just told my friend... she said that her dog doesnt listen to "NO" and she doesn't have any other "bad" words. She said she'd give clapping a go, but she doubts it would work.

    (i know that clapping wouldn't work for me if i had this problem... cause i've always clapped as praise for my dogs, they see it as a really positive thing )

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    Can she put a gate (like a baby gate if that would be enough) at the bottom of the stairs and try Beloz's suggestion?

    Or does an old fashioned water spray bottle or water pistol help to distract/dissuade her?

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