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Thread: 10 month old short hair border collie female needs a farm

  1. #1

    Default 10 month old short hair border collie female needs a farm

    Hi all, we've got a 10 month old short hair border collie female which we exercise a lot but she is slowly going nuts I think not being on a working farm.
    She is starting to herd the kids and annoying them in doing so, herding our couple of chickens which is annoying them too. She just seems obsessed with herding.
    We aren't really in the position to provide her with what she needs I'm starting to think.

    Very sad as she is a good dog and I like her. But it doesn't seem fair to her as she is getting a bit neurotic I guess not being able to do what she wants.

    She gets a good run most days and every 3rd day a 15km bike ride she tags along for. But must need more mental stimulation/challenges I guess which we don't have the time for.

    Is it possible to rehome border collies to farms, or unlikely to happen?

    Thanks
    Joel

    The Other Thread: http://www.dogforum.com.au/border-co...ing-stuff.html
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 10-18-2013 at 02:41 PM. Reason: included link to other thread about what to do

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    From observation, the border collies and kelpies that I meet in the city and that appear to be happy and manageable are all completely ball obsessed. But so much would depend on their genes whether a strategy like that would work. Agility would be another option. And we have a trainer an hour's drive from us that will offer herding classes for dogs like that.

    But if rehoming is the only viable option, you may want to contact a working dog rescue group about this? They would at least be able to give you advice. Here's one I have heard good things about: Australian Working Dog Rescue

  3. #3
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    Other Thread: http://www.dogforum.com.au/border-co...ing-stuff.html

    I'm putting my answer there.

    Your dog is perfectly normal for her breed and age. No farmer will want a herding dog that herds without permission.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 10-18-2013 at 02:41 PM.

  4. #4
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    True few farmers will want a dog like that and they start them from the moment they walk to herd properly.

    Try ringing some training clubs around your state especially agility/obedience places, that's what she needs. And the next dog, don't get a working breed!

  5. #5
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    I am one of those with a ball obsessed BC. Or frisbee. Or soccer ball.
    She would herd given half a chance but is not given the opportunity.
    She sees the ball as her work and herds her soccer ball joyfully. We live in a town not on a property but she gets two walks a day.
    The ball works for us, also a training
    I say again 10 months is teen years for a bright bored girl. It's as much commitment as time that has seen us through.

  6. #6
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    I think I have already answered this in another thread of the same title so there must be 2 running at the same time. As I said in the other thread, out here if a working dog doesnt shape up on a farm it usually gets shot. 2 dogs from similar circumstances have been rehomed on my farm but if they didnt shape up as working dogs I also do agility so I am probably different to most farmers in that either way it didnt worry me.

    Farmers pick their genetics and look for dogs whose parents have the genetics they need. Most people round here look for yard bred dogs. I personally need a big casting paddock dog which is what I have selected from a breeder who has proven paddock genetics.

    So rehoming on to a farm sounds like an ideal notion, but it doesnt work like that. Also most working dogs are not allowed to run free on a farm because of livestock, baits, snakes etc and are often penned or chained when not working.

    I also had a ball obsessed working breed in suburbia once but she came everywhere with me and I exercised her a lot. We were inseperable. Any which way these dogs are usually high maintenance and if you pick that breed you have to be prepared for that.

  7. #7
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    I've got a BC X who was to get shot because she wasn't a good enough worker. Don't know maybe farm life is generally overrated - at least those who aren't top-workers might end up having a pretty lousy life on a working farm.

    When we got our BC she didn't show any interest in the ball but with a bit of convincing (by our other dog) she now is a ball-nutter. In fact I think the only thing more fun than chasing the ball is herding our other dog chasing the ball. It doesn't need a lot to keep her sane... 2 sessions a day with the ball will keep her happy. Plus countless cuddles on the sofa in between of course. I think she is pretty fine with whatever we do - as long as she is allowed to hang around us and be part of our life.

  8. #8
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    I was told the shelters get many BC pups between 6 and 12 months old.
    Damn sad, awesome dogs.

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