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Thread: Advice needed for 8 year old staffy

  1. #21
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    @K&P

    Post #5 - OP is in the Hunter Valley - pretty close to Steve Courtney, I think.

    That's if she's really willing to do anything. So far that seems to have not happened. And she never wanted a log (dog?) anyway.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    @K&P

    Post #5 - OP is in the Hunter Valley - pretty close to Steve Courtney, I think.

    That's if she's really willing to do anything. So far that seems to have not happened. And she never wanted a log (dog?) anyway.
    Ah missed that post thanks Hya. Yes close to Steve i believe.

    I just hope they stop for a minute think about the dog a do what is right for it.

  3. #23
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    I feel so sad for this dog, staffies adore children. My dogs have never been around children much due to me being childless but when we have nieces and nephews over they get on so well with them. Of course we watch them all like a hawk but I've never had an issue yet and I have a dog aggressive dog as well. Personally I think you need to be prepared to put 100% into working on the dog/husband/child relationship or give the dog up to someone who is willing to love it like he deserves.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  4. #24
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    Babies and dogs of the same family should be introduced when the baby comes home....i have so many friends who have done this from day one so successfully, no matter what the breed.

    I would ask for some professional help doing it after this period of time and the fact that the dogs living arrangements have changed from before the baby entered the Family.

    It is actually easier for dogs to get used to babies when they are not moving around yet (just born). If integrated properly dogs usually love their family members. But I would be worried with all this possible tension from the mother and father as to how successful this would be now without help from a behaviour orientated trainer.

    I think having left is this late I would now ask for help..........
    Pets are forever

  5. #25
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Ah missed that post thanks Hya. Yes close to Steve i believe.

    I just hope they stop for a minute think about the dog a do what is right for it.
    Mac - The muzzle is a good idea, might build a bit of confidence in the husband.

    I think its great you have taken the step to look for solutions for yourself and you dog....
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  6. #26
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    You would be easily surprised how easy it is, to introduce a baby to a dog, where dog has been no 1. It was the same as me and my ex husband before we had children. We had Attila, a Blue heeler x. Such a beautiful dog but had no real experience around children...After I had bub no 1, my ex husband would take clothes and blankets home for Attila to smell and when I bought the bub home, we would let Attila (on leash and sitting) smell the baby. He was curious but gentle and ended up being a fantastic family dog.....Dogs do adapt. It is unfair of your husband to with hold that opportunity from your dog and daughter. I suggest at least attempting some kind of meet between dog and toddler, before you think of rehoming the dog.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    Ah missed that post thanks Hya. Yes close to Steve i believe.

    I just hope they stop for a minute think about the dog a do what is right for it.
    Agree hopefully they try something first to fix the issue before thinking of re-homing
    in my own opinion if it will be difficult to re-home her because of the age - correct me if
    I am wrong (I'm not expert its just how I see it) and you know what happened if
    you cannot re-home her
    m<(o.o)>m

  8. #28
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    Jul 2011
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    While you are getting professional advice, there are a couple of things you can do to reintroduce your dog as part of the family without upsetting any nerves (you are quite correct he will be lonely and bored down the back).

    Muzzle your dog when indoors whith your child so that he can't bite, (as has been suggested) or buy a crate and crate train him so that he can spend a few happy hours each day inside his crate in a room (family/dining) spending time with his humans that way. Once you and your husband see that he does not have homicidal thoughts towards your child, you should become a little more relaxed.

    And yes, if your husband is the one who has insisted no interaction, then he should be making the effort to give mental and physical stimulation and companionship by walking and training the dog daily. If I'm understanding correctly, you still gave companionship when your dog was able to come as close as the back door, yes? But at your new home he has been relegated to a dog run way up the back, so sad.

    I hope you are succesful in sorting your husband's fears and letting this boy be a part of your family again.

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