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Thread: Puppy not keen on walks in the morning

  1. #11

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    Interesting to know about the cuddles. Makes sense. I will let the wife know.

  2. #12
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    How gorgeous is that puppy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Congratulations on your new addition!! I have no advice other than don't work her too hard yet. Maybe walk around the back yard with her and the leash and reward her after she has walked a little distance, so she knows walking is a good thing. My pooch Oskar went to PUppy Preschool at My Best Friend Pet store up here, and he did well. Plus the staff are always friendly. She is beautiful!!

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oskar's mum View Post
    How gorgeous is that puppy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Congratulations on your new addition!! I have no advice other than don't work her too hard yet. Maybe walk around the back yard with her and the leash and reward her after she has walked a little distance, so she knows walking is a good thing. My pooch Oskar went to PUppy Preschool at My Best Friend Pet store up here, and he did well. Plus the staff are always friendly. She is beautiful!!
    Thanks! Yeah we is a cutie. You should have seen the picture they posted on the pound site! Cute to the power of "Awwwww!~"

    Yeah, backyard on a leash is looking like a good diea. Also the inlaws have a HUGE backyard so we take here there often to run around as they have no dogs so it should be a safe environment. They have chickens though... :s

    Hoping that the puppy preschool starts soon! Should be fun.

  4. #14

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    One good way of teaching puppy to be in the correct position for heeling on lead and to make life easier for when you are using a leash with her later - is to have very small bits of say sausage in your left hand, have her on the left hand side of you and lure her forward while feeding small bits of the treat. Position your left arm over the shoulder of the pup with your hand in front of her nose. Take small steps and I am sure she will follow your hand. She will not notice that she is being trained - but she will learn real quick that the best position to be is where she can get the treats.

    Make it fun and have fun !

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by RileyJ View Post
    One good way of teaching puppy to be in the correct position for heeling on lead and to make life easier for when you are using a leash with her later - is to have very small bits of say sausage in your left hand, have her on the left hand side of you and lure her forward while feeding small bits of the treat. Position your left arm over the shoulder of the pup with your hand in front of her nose. Take small steps and I am sure she will follow your hand. She will not notice that she is being trained - but she will learn real quick that the best position to be is where she can get the treats.

    Make it fun and have fun !
    Thanks for the tip. I've been practicing heeling her by walking and every time she walks ahead I change direction and head the other way. Bit hit and miss at the moment.

    May need to wait a bit with the hand over shoulders trick as I am 6 foot 4 and the puppy is 30cm at best. Long way for me to bend down just now.

  6. #16

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    I'd also visit a friend with quiet, laid back cats and the chooks would be great too - but you'll have to stand guard over the chooks, as they may really hurt, pecking. Teach 'gentle' as you can. It can be for toddlers, cats, guinea pigs, injured birds... My lot come over to check out whatever is in my hands and seem to do the oooh aaaah and then ARE gentle. They also learn, "It's a BABY!" satd in hushed and sacred tones.

    PS There should be protection from such overpowering cuteness. It effects sanity. I do not want any new dog under 4 years, minimum. Repeat until safe to leave home.
    Last edited by Menageriemanor; 05-15-2012 at 03:19 PM.

  7. #17

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    Yeah... Sophie seems interested in the chooks but not game to get too close. She mock pounces at them from about a meter away. Usually at that point the chooks either run away or the mock charge and Sophie runs for shelter at my feet. lol.

    Next door has a cat that Sophie hasn't run into yet, though probably a good thing as this cat is massive! 8kg easy. lol.

  8. #18

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    Getting her out the door and enjoying walks can be achieved very easily by using a buggy whip with a piece of sheep skin tied to the end of the string. You can use a fishing rod with a bit of line around 2 meters long. Drag that in front of her and she is going to chase it. Drag it out the door and away you go. Make it fun and reward her as much as you can.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  9. #19
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    Was just looking at your photo of cute little Sophie and I was just pondering, methinks she has some bull terrier in her, looking at her nose. Don't get me wrong, they are beautiful dogs!!

  10. #20
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    rule of thumb walking puppies - 5 minutes per month of age so at 8 weeks - doesn't need more than 10 minutes in one go. Ie you won't get round the block let alone 20 minutes. Try 10 minutes of games instead.

    Everything you need to know about raising puppy is here.
    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    And for the border collie (couldn't see staffy in that pic), these are great
    Shaping Success by Susan Garrett or her blog
    and Control Unleashed by Leslie McDevitt.

    Make a game out of recall, and practice lots. only call once, try to only call when she's coming already. If you think she might not come because of fun distraction - use another word like "pup pup pup" (traditional breeder dinner call for puppies) or "puss puss" (that's me being naughty but it works).

    If you need her and she doesn't come when you call, go get her, and reward her for going on lead.

    But if you practice recalls and games and fun, it means that recalls have good associations, not the end of fun associations that some dogs get.

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