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Thread: Should I get a puppy?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bayswater, Western Australia
    Posts
    134

    Default Should I get a puppy?

    Hi all,

    I have never owned a puppy; all my dogs have been adult rescue dogs that needed rehoming. 40 years ago, my parents acquired a pedigree pug puppy but he was not my dog. My American pit bull terrier Hobbes is now 12 years old and though he jauntily prances about as if he was 12 months old, the fact is that he is now an old dog. I have never had a dog that was more rewarding or more difficult to own than Hobbes. I'd never want any other breed than an APBT. Here in WA, that is possible.

    So, should I bite the bullet and acquire a pit bull puppy some time after Hobbes goes? Or should I do what I always have done and get another adult rescue? I am a bit torn; there are a bucket load of adult pit bulls to choose from here in WA who would really benefit from being rehomed, but I'd like to just once have a puppy. I have tried to weigh up the pros and cons and I am tending to the pros.

    Any advice would be appreciated. I am 100% stuck on my breed choice but other than that all advice is welcome.

    ricey

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    Youve never had a puppy?

    While i think it is fantastic that you rescue and it is special and exciting in its own way...I think you also have to experience the absolute joy and hilarity in raising a baby.

    Thats just what I think though.

  3. #3

    Default

    Would there be any pups ever available through rescue? You could have the best of both worlds...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bayswater, Western Australia
    Posts
    134

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    Youve never had a puppy?

    While i think it is fantastic that you rescue and it is special and exciting in its own way...I think you also have to experience the absolute joy and hilarity in raising a baby.

    Thats just what I think though.
    No, I have never had a puppy. The closest we have had to a puppy is Lizzie, our cream kelpie/corgi/dingo(?) cross who was around 4 to 5 months old when we got her as a "short term" foster ROFLMAO! Oh well; another foster failure!

    All our dogs have been rescues and I wouldn't change them for anything and they are all lovely dogs, but....... I'd like to have a puppy from 6 to 8 weeks old and socialise and train him early and well (yeah, I want a male puppy). I'd like to introduce him to people of all sorts and dogs of all sorts. I'd want to get him used to noisy cars and loud people and sleeping on the couch. And I'd like to gently train him to have a rock solid dependable recall above any other training aim. I think that should be the first consideration for training. All the other stuff like "stay" and "sit" and "drop" and "leave it" and "heel" and "roll over and play dead" are secondary to a good recall. After all this time I think that I would do a reasonable job of socialising and training a puppy. I have seen a bucketload of adult dogs that were not well trained.

    Me, I am getting old too, just like my Hobbes. I will be 56 in a few months and sooner or later I won't have the stamina for a pit bull puppy. At the moment, I do.

    So, sometime in the next few years I will get myself a puppy.

    ricey

  5. #5

    Default

    I think you've earned it. Can't help feeling sad, There are so many of your breed that need big hearts. Is there any chance you could take on one of each? I like the 2 or 3 or 4 dogs, at a time. It's often more chaotic but it's like having an only child, or a houseful of kids. If you got a really sooky, middleaged dog, you could have the hilarity of watching them both, together. I sometimes have rescued kittens here and the dogs are hilarious - and so gentle. The main carer is a little terrier. She starts with the 3, 4, 5 week olds, so paranoid about being gentle, and 2 weeks later, she's flipping them like burgers, to clean bottoms and faces. The cats climb on her and sleep with her... Plus, when you get the possibly 2 years of teen puppy, your older dog will take the majority of bounce you would have copped.

  6. #6

    Default

    i'd go the puppy, i like to know that all my dogs fault are entirely my fault lol

    just on a different note, it might be worth going pedigree amstaff instead incase bsl spreads to wa, really no difference between the two imo

  7. #7

    Default

    There is BSL in WA. BSL in WA requires that any dog of a restricted breed wear special collars, have special child proof enclosures, signage on fences etc and if a police officer or council officers believes that the above is not being followed they can seize and destroy the dog.
    DOG (RESTRICTED BREEDS) REGULATIONS (NO. 2) 2002

    Certainly not the worst BSL in the country but still BSL.

    I am sure Ricey is aware of all of this and is willing to do what is required.

    Puppies are great Ricey, I personally will probably more often then not have a combo of 1 rescue, 1 of my own raised dogs, depending on the dogs. I like the idea of raising my own puppy so I can ensure they are getting the socialisation that I want them to get (which is shiteloads) but I also want to help the unfortunate buggers who through no fault of their own end up homeless.

    Keep us updated on your search for a breeder (please make sure you go through someone reputable who isn't just in it for the $$$, our breed is too precious and to endangered to encourage idiots).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,289

    Default

    I am thinking along the same lines, ricey. One day I will get that puppy. I got tempted when I got my last new dog, but I wasn't actually in a good position to care for a tiny puppy because of my work commitments. So maybe I'll have to wait till I retire! Or take long service leave...

    I'm fostering cats at the moment and I feel really selfish, but I decided that if we get a cat of our own, we will get a little kitten. I think I too deserve experiencing the joy of that stage and also the experience of knowing the pet's whole history.

  9. #9

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    Go the puppy. They are hard work but a joy to work with. I love the puppy class when I instruct at the club. It is so good to see these tiny toys interacting with Dobbs or Labbies and enjoying themselves before all the testosterone steps in and ruins their frame of mind.
    You know that the work you are putting in will create the dog you want and there is no baggage to worry about.
    Nev Allen
    Border River Pet Resort

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Perth, WA
    Posts
    724

    Default

    I agree, get a puppy. There's nothing like that unconditional love of the puppy, not to mention the puppy smell and that fat little belly and knowing it's your baby to train, socialise, love and laugh at the antics...

    I'm in WA and I go to training classes way out the back of Joondalup and they have puppy classes on Saturday mornings and for the last 15 minutes the puppies are all taken off-lead and allowed to play together in a huge fenced off grass area, always supervised by the trainers, I love it, funny bundles of fluff of all shapes and sizes...

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