Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Early age desexing

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    260

    Default

    So, say I adopt from a rescue, like the RSPCA and I get a puppy who has been desexed - does that mean I should not do agility? It is something I would like to do with my dog, though not essential.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    BrisVagas
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    You have opened a can of worms with many opinions.

    I will only answer form a giant point of view. the risk of bone related problems are much greater than any risk of cancers if you desex a giant early.

    So with Giants you wait until the growth plates are closed. That can be between 18-24 month even later.

    Anesthetic risk in a good vet practice does not change if dogs are older....if anything young puppies can be high risk, just like kids are higher risk compared to adults...you just do not want the very old.

    As to the cancer thing, there are many more cancers due to desexing then form not desexing.....Cav's copy is a good read in that respect.

    Older bitches are more prone (6 years up) to ovarian. That is why some Breeders will desex after bitches are no longer needed for breeding.

    I have had none desexed males and females, I do however desex my females before the age of six.........If not used for Breeding i prefer about 3 years old for desexing bitches..I leave our males entire. Have had lots of male dogs and none have died of any kind of cancer.

    But I do see the sense of desexing, when people find it easier to keep dogs and not breed unwanted litters

    Yep I'm with you on this one..I would never desex a giant unless at least 2 year old.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Asrais

    I'm doing agility with my dog. So far so good. I think if you adopted a very large breed puppy that was desexed very young, then maybe not. I just take it as it comes. I have a friend who got a very nice BC from good lines, and it has had one injury problem after another, currently has shoulder problems and it's not desexed. It's like a ticket in a lottery. It also depends how intense your training on equipment or with tight turns is. For me and Frosty - we don't do a lot of training on equipment that would risk injury and we do some training that involves strengthening for those tight turns and jumps.

    RSPCA and AWL often have older farm dogs - eg 1 year olds - available and they would likely not have been desexed until they arrived, and I reckon they'd be perfect candidates for agility.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Im sorry but Im going to ask a silly question.....By giant you mean which breed??? The reason I ask is....Toffee is a amstaff x bull mastiff should I be waiting longer before I get her fixed up???

  5. #25

    Default

    I am in complete agreement with newfsie. My male will never be desexed because all the studies I have read seem to suggest although we have a pet over-population problem, individual dogs (less sure about females) are better off with their bits. The increased risk of bone cancers associated with desexing far outweigh the miniscule risk of testicular cancer, but the studies that concerned me most and really decided the issue were the ones that have found that dogs desexed at any age are more prone to age related deterioration, particularly their cognitive function.

    I still advocate desexing to the masses because I don't actually think most people know how to own dogs. If there was more education about dog ownership, more people trained their dogs and prevented accidental litters (that's just negligence in my mind) well I would instead advocate the abolishment of desexing same way we have outlawed any other unnecessary surgical alteration.

    ETA I guess I feel it prudent to add that I forced my sister to desex her dogs and all the problems they had with them were resolved (the male wandered and escaped all the time). However now the female is incontinent and both have lost their beautiful silky coats (they're papillons). I always desex cats - you can train an entire dog to listen to you over any other drives he may have (prey, defense, mate) but good luck with a cat...
    Last edited by 99bottles; 05-10-2012 at 08:17 PM.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    @Lea05

    Giant is Newfoundlands, St Bernards, Great Danes, Wolfhounds etc.

    A Bull Mastiff - is probaby Giant. I wouldn't call an Amstaff "Giant" - I don't know about a cross. Maybe talk to your favourite vet about it. If you can hold off till she's six months old that would be good. After that you'd risk her going into season - like having a period - ie smelly and messy for a couple of weeks, maybe every 6 months or so and you also risk all manner of dogs trying to break in to get at her... and then you risk unwanted puppies - which are more of a health risk for the mother than early desex - in my opinion. I know you can get "the pill" for bitches (no messy periods or matings), but that might have the same risks as early desex - I'm not sure. They are risks - not definite certainties.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sunshine coast Qld
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    All the science suggests desexing before at LEAST 6 months and much later fpr giant breeds is in the best interest of the dogs and their health and functionality in the future.
    I am fairly sure most if not all breeds do not have a first season before 5-6 months.

    Where rescue groups are concerned im not sure what the answer is there and agree with 99 about stupid owners if they were to get undesexed puppies.
    I wonder if they forced new owners to pay upfront for the desexing at 6 months and councils require all dogs to be desexed by 6 months????

    As for ANKC breeders desexing puppies at 8 weeks to avoid having these purebreds being bred from, responsible breeders dont breed very often and choose carefully homes for those puppies so not sure who's interests are being looked after there?
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Brisbane, Queensland
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Thanks folks. Another question for the vet. I wasnt planning on getting her fixed up before 6mths anyway so all is good.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •