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Thread: Dogs left home alone...

  1. #1
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    Default Dogs left home alone...

    I am still looking at different breeds, trying to choose the correct one for our family, but as I talk to breeders many of them keep telling me that their dogs aren't very good when left alone during the day.

    Now, I'm just wondering - surely most dog owners work, leaving their pets at home? Is this the wrong thing to do?

    I am a student, I am out from 7.30am until about 3.30pm, my husband works similar hours. Next year, I will be able to work from home most of the time, but not always.

    The idea of getting a puppy now, aside from my own impatients, was that it would learn that it is ok to be alone, rather than becoming completely dependant on me when I am home all the time.

    Puppy wouldn't be completely alone, he would have the company of the cats, a bird and two guinea pigs and I only do those hours 4 days a week. It would also have exercise before and after work/ college and have kongs and other activities left for it during the day - and would be inside ( I plan on litter training until he is old enough to use the cat flap/ doggie door.)

    All this talking to breeders is making me more confused! Oh, they were yorkie breeders, but the more I read about different small breeds, the more I come across this issue.

  2. #2
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    I think a lot of smaller companion type breeds are all the same. Staffies are prone to separation anxiety, but I have left my two at home since they were both 6 weeks old. I think Bella went through a stage where she was always escaping but she is past it now.

    Mine don't know anything different.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3
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    I get to deal with a lot of anxiety problem in small breed....not so much in large breeds. But I sometimes (often really) feel it has to do with the owners personality. I think you can teach any dog to be able to cope spending some time away from the owners. It is important to start this early for short periods.....be in the house, but puppy out of sight, happy with some bone or toy...teaching a puppy that it is good to be just lying somewhere calmly and not always on someone's lap when they are home. Some people tend to always have little dogs/puppies with them, constantly touching, petting and nearby...So then they expect these dogs to be OK when left suddenly alone. Give puppies time alone from day one, short periods initially with some form of entertainment.

    Just always be careful with leaving any puppy dog, with little animals that run/scurry........because prey drive can set in at a very early age.

    There are some badly bred anxious dogs too.....Observe the parents, if you see their personality as anxious type........Pass......And find some other dogs. Dogs also need to be bred for temperament, not only conformation.
    So meet the parents after you have checked the health checks.....A lot of dogs that come from puppy farms have anxiety problems. That is why I always ask where puppies come from and if they were well socialised by the Breeder....Lots can be done by the Breeder to help puppies later in life.

    So simply put there are many underlying reasons for anxiety in dogs (separation or other types)

    I think if a dog gets quality time with their owners and especially if they tend to live with their owners, they can cope with the owners working away for some hours. Especially with some other animal companions like cat/dog
    Last edited by newfsie; 04-19-2012 at 08:58 PM.
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
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    The plan at the moment is that we will both take our two weeks holidays when puppie arrives, mainly so we can deal with the sleepless first nights and also start socializing him, but also, so we can slowly get him used to being by himself, so I think I am on the right track with that.

    I don't think the guinea pigs will be a problem - they are old and don't even run away when the cats pat them, plus they are enclosed, so they'll be ok.

    In the early days, puppy will be left in a play pen in the living room when he is alone - he will be able to see, but not have access to the house. This is mainly because we want the cats to have time to adjust to puppy and keep puppy from bothering them and getting smacked! The living room is also where the bird and piggies live, so it won't be too quiet.

    I am willling to wait for the right puppy, and will definately not buy with out seeing parents - I have had that experience before. My dog back in Ireland, we got her as a puppy, when we saw her mum, she ran up to us happily and the owner commented that it was odd because she is usually nervous of strangers - I was so swept up with the cute puppies that it didn't sink in, but we had just inherited mums nervous aggressiveness.

    Thank you for your responses - I'm finding this whole process really frustrating at the moment, I so badly want to get it right.

  5. #5
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    Wish you luck in your search
    Pets are forever

  6. #6
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    It is often mentioned that some breeds are better than others. But I agree that lots depends on the owners and probably also the individual dog. But in my opinion that doesn't mean you should just dismiss it. You may have to work harder on getting your dog to accept that they have to stay home alone.

    There are also different reasons why dogs may not be good at staying home alone. Whether it is boredom or separation anxiety or just a very social nature and getting lonely.

    It is good of you to ask though. Even if the answer isn't what you want to hear. And even if the breeder may base their opinion on their own dogs which may just have never been prepared for coping with being alone.

    I am not being much help here. lol

    Just take your time, maybe write a few lists with plus/cons, specific requirements for certain breeds, etc and let it sink in for a while. That often helps me think about things and come to a decision.

  7. #7
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    Oskar is an AMSTAFF x, and he gets left alone on a regular basis, he gets locked in the house and he actually is quite good. He has destroyed somethings, but thats if we leave them laying around, we have learnt to put things up, or leave him a bone, he spends most of the time lazing around!!

  8. #8
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    I personally feel that it is not a good idea to take time off work for two weeks as the pup gets used to so much attention then wonders where it has gone when people go back to work. After a few of days to settle in I would implement the way that it will be when you do go back to work. I have never had a dog with separation anxiety though I guess many can be but I feel it is up to the owners and the dog as to how this will go in a lot of cases.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  9. #9
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    As Di dee said, dont let them get to used to having you around 24/7, but it's a good idea to have that time of work so you can get a routine for toilet training happening (late nights, no sleep ). That second week i'd be working on leaving them alone little bit by little bit. I reckon it could also be a good time to crate train them aswell.

    We have Guinea Pigs aswell and they keep Mojo entertained during the day. Ours are brave little buggers too and arnt fazed by him at all, infact it looks like they try to bite him if he goes to close. He thinks it's a big game

    It can be confusing picking a breed, breeder, pup. But the more effort you put in know will pay off later. Bare with it and good luck.

    Oh, and heaps of piccies when you do choose one please !!!


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  10. #10
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    Thanks guys!

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