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Thread: How to choose a breed?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    260

    Default How to choose a breed?

    Hi everyone.

    I mentioned in the introductions area that I am currently trying to choose a breed for our puppy. I have looked at various different "designer" crossbreeds - but I'm concerned about the health, welfare and the possibilities of puppy mills in that regard.

    I have considered rescue - all my animals prior to this puppy have been rescue animals, however, it is difficult to find puppies of predictable size and temperament in rescue centres. It is not of the list yet, however, as I don't really care what breed it is, as long as it fits certain criterea and it may be unlikely, but not impossible to find what I am looking for in a rescue centre.

    So perhaps you kind folk can help me pick a breed suited to my family? I have a house with a small garden, fully fenced. I have two cats, two guinea pigs and a birds - this is where buying from a breeder will be helpful, because the pup would hopefully have already started socialization, at least with cats. For the first year of his life with us, he will be on his own in the house for a max of about 4/5 hours 4 days a week. After that, I will be working from home most of the time.

    I want a small/ toy sized dog, I don't mind long hair as I have done a grooming course and I can do all that myself. I can walk it twice a day and my husband occasionally goes jogging and would like to bring the dog with him.

    I have been considering different breeds - papillions, bichon, maltese, yorkies, poms, affenpinscher - I can't decide!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    2,903

    Default

    What about a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel or a pug? They are pretty low maintenance although do like to be around their family. They probably wouldn't go well with jogging though...but I personally wouldn't take any small dog jogging

    I would stay away from the designer dogs, they are just as unpredictable as the rescue puppies and you can also run into issues with puppy farming etc.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3

    Default

    Cavalier. They are an awesome family dog. They very rarely develop any brhavioural issues. Easy to socialise to other animals and fairly low prey drive. Would enjoy a couple walks a day but not sure on the jogging (but as mentioned by Jade no small dogs are suitable for jogging really). Great with kids. Wont suffer if you cant walk it for whatever reason. Easy enough to groom. Happy little cuddle monsters.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    I third a cavalier king charles they're such lovely dogs

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
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    Default

    I fourth the cavalier...but lately I have been having quite a few papillons in my classes. If you want really small, they are a great dog....Very good at obedience and we have two in agility now. they are gentle and game.
    I really have taken a liking to them and I am a big dog person
    Pets are forever

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Perth, WA
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    I also recommend cavalier king charles spaniel or pug ... cavaliers are beautiful little dogs.

    My last dog was a bitza, mainly pug - beautiful quirky little personalities ... BUT ... they breathe heavily and can snore like a freight train ... so loyal and hilarious - after a bad day a wag from his little piggy tail and a snort from him and it was all ok He would never have been a jogger, he loved his walks, as he got older he'd push into my lower leg when he was tired and I'd pick him up and carry him... Don't know what he was crossed with, but he never dropped any hair...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Sunshine coast Qld
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    Cavaliers have a beautiful sweet personality but some do suffer significant health issues as do pugs. Cavies also do not do well left alone, even for the hours you mentioned, so if you do decide on a cavie, it would be best to wait till your at home more.I really would suggest a slightly larger more robust breed for jogging with and rescue's are a great idea, as temperment with any dog is never guaranteed, but with rescue, if it dosent work out for you and the dog you can always take them back.
    Good luck.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  8. #8

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    Maybe consider some of the smaller terriers if you're after 'tuff but tiny'

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Default

    I really like cavaliers - but the health problems associated with them has worried me - with pugs too. I pretty much ruled out the brachycephallic breeds because of the health issues and the snoring ( yes, I know affenpinshcers are in this group, but they are so cute!)
    The jogging isn't something thats absolutely necessary - hubbie will just have to go for walks instead!.

    I have considered terriers - I love cairn terriers, but I also love my garden - I would have to work out a way to stop/ divert the digging! Maybe a sandpit?

    I have emailed a few breeders - papillion, maltese and bichon - to ask a few questions and see when their next litters will be etc. At the moment I am leaning toward papillion, as they are meant to be really smart, but I'm a bit worried about them being so delicate - we have no kids, but we have got two young crazy cats!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
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    Something like a JRT or foxy would probably be able to keep up with you jogging! But it sounds like you are leaning towards something more cuddly...

    One of the reasons why I got a dog from a rescue organisation for the second time was because I figured that the foster carers would have a good idea of their temperament. If they've been in foster care for a little while they are road tested, so to speak. I also only had a size criteria as far as breed go, but had a list of traits that I was after (or not after). I knew that the dog I got was not a barker (took months before I even heard her bark!) or a digger or an escape artist and that she was good with other dogs and stayed close when let off lead. I got an idea of her exercise requirements and knew she would cope with staying home alone while I was at work. Her foster carer was unusual in that she did not have any other pets, but most of them have half a zoo at their place. There were still some traits that I would not have chosen, but because she fit all my other criteria, I can very easily live with those. I'm sure my dog finds some of my traits annoying too.

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