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Thread: How to choose a breed?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Sunshine coast Qld
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    My EX had a Corgi when I first met him, every time I turned to walk away the little monster used to bite by ankles, that was until he met Mr Jaro Vix
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  2. #32
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    Apr 2012
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    Adelaide
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    Hi Asrais. Thank you for the compliment for our puppies who we love so much words cannot describe. Feel free to "Like" their Facebook page and stay up to date with Fos and Ebo's latest photo's and video's.

    Cardi's get to be around 30cm tall at the withers (shoulderblades). They have also been known as the yard long dog which is their length from the tip of their nose to the end of their tail in the standing position and when the tail is held out.

    To fly them both at 8.5 weeks of age in a medium sized crate from Melbourne to Adelaide cost $120 (i.e. not each; total for the two in one crate) I think it was, plus $50 for the crate (which the breeder bought at a wholesale price). Flying them interstate is inexpensive but flying them in from New Zealand presents complications and additional expenses; this is something generally only done by breeders.

    Cardigan Welsh Corgi's are known as a vulnerable breed, meaning that they are less popular than other breeds (for example, only 119 were born in the UK last year where they originate from - I think it was last year). To the best of my knowledge, there's no reason for this lack of popularity other than breeds go in and out of fashion; e.g. 10 years ago rottweilers and dalmations went through a little popularity boom and right now I see a lot of labradors and golden retrievers around. Anyway, the reason I raise this is that I got the impression when I telephoned Cardigan Welsh Corgi breeders around Australia that they sounded quite accustomed to flying puppies to other states, and I believe its for this reason; i.e. that they're not one of the most popular breeds so breeders often have to. In SA, for example, I could only find a couple of registered breeders of Cardigan Welsh Corgi's; there were more breeders of Pembroke Welsh Corgi's but we really wanted Cardi's.

    If you're interested in getting a Cardi, here's an incomplete list of registered breeders but it's the biggest list I've found on the Net: Welsh Corgi (Cardigan) Breeders, Australia . From there, all the breeders know each other and generally refer you to other breeders if you're searching for a particular coat such as brindle and white (some coat colours are rarer, such as blue merle - there was a litter of these born in Queensland recently). When we expressed to breeders we were looking specifically for brindle and white cardi's, for example, they referred us to other breeders who they thought might have them. It was, ultimately, only through these referrals by other Cardigain Welsh Corgi breeders that we were able to find Fos and Ebo.

    On the same site as the one in the paragraph above, you'll find some Cardigan Welsh Corgi puppies currently for sale. Some other sites you might be interested in are:
    - The Intelligence of Dogs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    - Cardigan Welsh Corgi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    - Dog Breeds | PEDIGREE
    - Cardigan Welsh Corgi | American Kennel Club
    - Cardigan Welsh Corgi Information and Pictures, Welsh Corgis, Corgi, Corgis
    - Burke's Backyard > Fact Sheets > Cardigan Welsh Corgi

  3. #33
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    Apr 2012
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    Adelaide
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    I think they may be a little bigger than we are looking for - we are wanting a dog which, full grown, will be about the same size as our cats.

    Thats alot less than I thought to transport puppies interstate - I had pretty much ruled out getting a dog from interstate because of the cost, but I may reconsider. Then again, I would want to go and check out where they live and the parents etc, so it would probably still be too expensive.

  4. #34
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    Jul 2011
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    Sunshine coast Qld
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    Thats great that you want to see where the pup was raised as sometimes what someone says and what "is" it totally different. There are really good responsible breeders and really bad ones, and whether they are registered or not makes no difference when it comes to caring loving responsible people.

    You really can not responsibly buy a puppy from someone you have never met or checked out where the pup was raised. They may imply their dogs are family raised with the pups parents an important part of their family, when in reality they have 20 pens and 20 dogs out back in them.
    The same goes for buyers, responsible breeders dont sell to people they have never met as they need to be assured the pup is going to a loving caring family.
    Also reseach any genetic diseases your chosen breed may have and what tests are available for those conditions. A good breeder will have those tests available to you, showing parents and grandparents clear of those conditions.
    There are responsible breeders out there and with a bit of foresight and research, you will find your forever healthy companion.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  5. #35
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    Apr 2012
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    Adelaide
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    I am going to see the papillion breeder Saturday week - she invited me to come see her and her dogs while she is showing, but I really want to check out their home, before making any plans.
    The more I research the breed, the more it grows on me. Lookwise, it's not what I had in my mind - but who could resist those great big ears!

    They don't seem to have many inherit diseases - apparently, they can have a problem with their knees and I think I read somewhere they can have heart problems, so they'll be the ones to watch for.

    I haven't heard back from any other breeders I emailed - I may have to start going to shows and bothering people

  6. #36

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    Oh Papillions are just delightful!! Sounds very exciting going to see a breeder.

    Italian Greyhounds are another great choice if you aren't certain on the Pap yet. Another to consider is a Chinese Crested (Hairless or Powderpuff) which are athletic like Paps, and just beautiful.

    Cardigan corgis are my favourite in the Working dog group. But yes, a big dog on small legs. Gorgeous, gorgeous. And the pups? With those big ears??? Swoon...

  7. #37

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    I once rescued a classic black labrador, (imagining this?) now shrink it to half size, then halve the length of leg. A lab breeder/shower saw only his head and said it was near perfect and asked his breeding and when he met Langley, he was in shock!!!

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