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Thread: How to choose a breed?

  1. #21
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    Hi Lala, my pug x was a great walker, we did about 5km a day in his younger years, but any faster than a walk and he almost hyperventilated, like he couldn't get his breath - we decreased the distance over the years, and he always let me know when he'd had enough, he'd push into my leg and almost trip me over, and then I'd pick him up and carry him for about 5 minutes, then he'd wriggle to get down and walk again. Oh how I miss him and his snorting and snoring ...

  2. #22
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    You know, I don't think I've actually met many papillions - thats why it's good that I'll get to meet her dogs and see what they are like before deciding - and obviously, she wants to check me out too!

    I think, in the long run, the cats will be alright - they've been brought up around small animals and encountered a few dogs in their time - but I reckon they won't speak to me for a few weeks after pup comes home. Though desexed, the female one has a very motherly instinct, so maybe she'll adopt the puppy:P

    When pup comes home, I'm gonna get one of those feliway plugs and put it in the room with the dog - hopefully that will reduce the stress for the cats. Also, I'm getting a puppy pen, so the dog will be confined while the cats can come inspect the newbie!

    We've read that papillions can be good at agility, so hubbie is considering that as an alternitive to jogging.

  3. #23
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    Sounds like you've got some fun ahead, it's always interesting checking out different breeds. Have fun meeting the papillions, I've never actually met one either. I'm sure you'll get heaps of useful information from the breeder, maybe make a list of questions to ask.

    Have you looked at whippets ? Just to confuse you a bit more ...

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    Personally, their size and their stamina. I just can't see myself running a pug, cavie or mini foxy for example down the road. I try to avoid running my two... they don't know the difference between sprinting and jogging, they are all just sprint sprint sprint!
    I reckon size and stamina might be a misconception. Well obviously some breeds are definitely not suited to jogging but its not just a size thing.

    Pippi is half foxy so that probably helps, but she has a shih tzu body with very short legs and she can do about 3-5 k's on a bike. Running the whole way. Then you get home, she takes 10 minures to get her breath and if you wanted, you could take her out again. On really long rides (or even at the end of a standard ride), she does start flagging (going a bit slower) and I just carry her for 5 mins until she gets her breath and then she is good to go again.

    Pippi has much more stamina/endurance than Barney does and long after he has slowed she is still going strong. Plus, he takes the whole night to recover whereas Pippi takes 10 mins.

    I think with some small breeds, people assume they cant do things when in fact they actually can do those things, and they really enjoy doing those things. They are still dogs after all.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by findeb View Post
    Hi Lala, my pug x was a great walker, we did about 5km a day in his younger years, but any faster than a walk and he almost hyperventilated, like he couldn't get his breath - we decreased the distance over the years, and he always let me know when he'd had enough, he'd push into my leg and almost trip me over, and then I'd pick him up and carry him for about 5 minutes, then he'd wriggle to get down and walk again. Oh how I miss him and his snorting and snoring ...
    Thats a pug though, and I agree, pugs probably arent cut out for jogging.

  6. #26
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    I have considered whippets - but they are a little big for our house - italian greyhounds are on the list though!

    I think the jogging thing will be on my list of questions for the breeder. I know papillions are supposed to be high energy dogs, despite their size. As for knowing the difference between sprinting and jogging, I'd imagine you can train them to match your speed. Our Tess (maltese x shi tzu x scottie) used to match her pace to hubbie when he jogged. It wasn't deliberate training, just something she picked up as she went along.

  7. #27
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    what about a toy poodle? I know people don't like the "look" of them but i think they are so cuddly and cheeky! They're so energetic i'm sure you could take it for a jog at least and i've seen some do agility quite well. They're small, don't shed & are very intelligent! Bichon's i have found are extremely stubborn, well the one's i've come across anyway (including my mums!)

    I wouldn't worry about the cats, we adopted 3 dogs into our home which was already occupied by my 3 cats. Age doesn't even really matter as the cat will put the dog in it's place if it's out of line. Of course they will be annoyed with you for awhile, but they get over it - mine even sleep together.

  8. #28
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    Toy poodles also on the shortlist

    I don't think I've ever encountered a Bichon either. Seems that if it's not malti- something or a something- poo, you don't see them around so often. Even during my short stint as a groomer (trainee, I hated it!) all the little dogs I saw were maltese crosses.

  9. #29
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    We have a couple of 12 week old, brindle and white, sibling, cardigan welsh corgi's. We walked through all the dog pounds first but couldn't find any cardigan welsh corgi's so we had to get them from a breeder.

    My wife and I chose this breed of dog after doing some thorough research. We went to a local dog park and watched all the various breeds of dogs which came and went, discussing which types of dogs were of interest to us. It was there that we saw a beatiful three year old brindle and white cardigan welsh corgi for the first time named Toby. We struck up a conversation with his owner about the dog and breed. Until then, we had only known the prombroke welsh corgi's (because of their popularity and the Queen's love for pembrokes). We researched all the small and medium sized dogs (as we live in the burbs) for cuteness, health issues, intelligence and easiness to train. Corgi's ticked all the boxes. We then researched about Corgi's history and how they're a herding dog, therefore meaning they'll need lots of exercise.

    We really liked the brindle and white, partially because of those tiger-style stripes they get on their coats, so it had to be cardigans. We also felt sorry for the cardigans because the pembrokes are more popular, largely because Pembrokes don't have tails (apologies to pembroke lovers when I write that we also love to see tails wagging with doggy joy). We contacted breeders around the whole country looking for brindle and white cardigan welsh corgis. We found blue merle, brindle point, and black and white litters. Then, finally, we found a litter of 8 puppies interstate with three brindle and white puppies, two of which were boys and one of which was a girl. We jumped on two of them and paid as quickly as we could (AU$750 each), getting them flown over from Victoria to Adelaide at 8.5 weeks of age.

    If you're still choosing which type of dog to get, you might be interested in taking a look at the photos and videos on our Facebook and Youtube pages in my email signature below. I update these regularly with more photos and videos, and am currently starting the 10 week photos and videos. My wife and I wholeheartedly recommend cardigan welsh corgi's.

  10. #30
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    Fosandebo - your pups are adoreable! How big do corgis get?

    If you don't mind me asking - how much did it cost to fly them from Victoria to Adelaide?

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