Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: I'm getting another puppy yay!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    179

    Default I'm getting another puppy yay!

    So after months of researching I've finally found a Labrador breeder that i love! She lives 5 1/2 hours away from me so it'll be a big long drive to pick her up but I think it's worth it, the breeder asks $1400 for the pup, a $700 deposite when the pup is 5 weeks then the rest at pick up, pup comes with pedigree for both parents and pup micro chipping worming a bag of food 14 weeks puppy insurance and from her Facebook page I see she keeps in contact with a lot of her pups new owners which I think is lovely, I guess I just wanted to check with you guys that it all sounds good and If anyone has any advice about selecting a pup or any questions I should be asking the breeder before I pay this $700 deposit
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    2,903

    Default

    I have no breeder advice... but congratulations on making the decision to get a new pup! Can't wait to see some pictures

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    Congratulations.....Good luck with it all. I like Breeders that keep contact
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    elle.burns

    It sounds reasonable - try to meet the parent bitch and puppies at their home before you fork over the deposit - ie puppy farms are unlikely to let you meet the parent dogs or see the conditions before you're fully committed.
    How do I find a good dog breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Puppy should not go to a new home until it is at least 8 weeks old (maybe older) according to the RSPCA. So if they're willing to let the puppy go younger than 8 weeks - I would run away.
    How old should a puppy be before they are adopted/purchased? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Also - how many litters are they having a year, (with more than one bitch I hope), if it's a high number - like over 5 litters - how do they manage to give all the puppies individual attention - the sort needed for a people friendly dog?

    You want the pedigree for the puppy - ie you want the puppy to be registered with ANKC - and collect those papers. These papers should show the ancestry for the dog for about 5 generations, maybe more. And you should be able to find out if it is "limited" ie puppy is not meant to be bred or shown or "main" - good for showing or breeding in that breeder's opinion. If you want to show your puppy in ANKC affiliated shows, or breed - you need to find that out - ideally get something in writing.

    And you should be able to see copies of the hip scores for both parent dogs. If they haven't done hip tests (involves x rays of the hips under general anaesthetic for each parent dog), I would run away.
    Information on Hip Scoring for Labradors from Labrador Health by John Weller
    the lower the number the better, when it comes to hip scores.

    This has a good list of articles on choosing breeders etc.
    Articles

    I would seek references outside the breeder's own website and facebook pages - because those are what the breeder wants you to see. Some people have been in here - with nightmares about their new puppy because they didn't do any independent checking of the breeder. They just liked their web page. ARGH.

    I don't know where the "south coast" is - for me it would be Victor Harbor, or maybe Beach Port or even South Bruny, Tasmania... but there's bound to be a labrador club or association in your state - I'd be googling for them, phoning them up and asking their opinion of the breeder you like - ask some of the questions on the how do I find a good breeder list, or here...
    Getting a Dog Tips - Checklist for the Responsible Breeder
    (try not to ask all the questions all at once, sort of work your way through...)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    179

    Default

    Thanks so much for thelinksthey were extremely helpful
    Do you think it's bad that the breeder asks for a deposit to secure the selected pup? (have to select via pictures and breeders recommendations as shlicense 6 1/2 hours away from me?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sunshine coast Qld
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    Great your getting a new pup and the breeder sounds great. I see your going to their home to pick him up so thats great to. It usually is the norm to pay a deposit to hold a pup but as Hyacinth said, you should go to their home, choose your pup, check they have the paperwork and health checks and check out everything is clean and the dogs happy before handing over the deposit, because if at 8 weeks and you are going there for the first time, and things are not as she has told you...you may not get the money back.

    It really is best to make that trip twice, and to choose a pup by photo? Will you get that pup in the end? Will those that have gone to the pups home to choose, end up wanting and getting YOUR pup, and you just get the one left over?

    That happened to a friend recently and the pup she ended up getting was mismarked (didnt really matter as she wasnt breeding or showing) , she loves it anyway but ended up being very dissappointed with the whole proccess.
    It is really your choice but hyacinths and this information will ensure you get a healthy pup from a good breeder without dissapointment.
    Good luck and keep us updated, we LOVE puppies here.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sunshine coast Qld
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    And as one wise poster said here recently, you dont choose the pup.........they choose you! You will know know when you sit with the litter for a while which one chooses YOU.
    The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.
    Mohandas Gandhi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

    Default

    I would visit the litter at least once, even though it is a long way away. anytime between 5-7 weeks will give you some idea

    If you have done your homework correctly in finding a responsible breeder, picking the puppy should be relatively easy. In their interview of you the breeder should have tried to find out something about your life style. Are you very active people? More sedentary? Do you have children and what are their ages and their sexes? All of these things are going to factor into which puppy will fit best in your house.

    While within a breed you should be able to expect general trends in activity level, dominance and temperament, each puppy is an individual with its own unique style. Within a litter you will find puppies that are more or less dominant with more or less energy. Just as you wouldn't expect all your children to be cookie-cutter replicas of each other, don't expect this from the puppies either.

    Some breeders rely heavily on various puppy temperament testing methods. Some rely heavily on observing and interacting with the puppies to determine their individual personality traits. Unless you are looking for specific traits in order to train a dog to compete or work in a specific area (like bomb detection), there are too many factors that can influence how a puppy reacts in a single testing session. Is he tired? Did he just eat? Is he just having an off day? In order to be accurate, the puppy temperament testing, in our opinion, should be repeated several times.

    Personally when i go to choose a puppy I visit every week from 4 weeks and use the Volhard system, because i look for specifics to train for Water rescue........ Volhard Dog Training and Nutrition: Behavior and Training: Behavior

    Whichever method your breeder uses, you should trust their judgement in evaluating the puppies, if you have no experience. But bear in mind that what you see in a 5 to 8 week old puppy is just an indicator and is not an absolute. The experiences the puppy has once he goes to your home will also determine what the adult grows up to be.

    Every breeder works their selection process differently. Some breeders pick the puppies for the new owner, some give the owner full reign. Most take a course somewhere in the middle. They make observations about the individual puppy's temperament, activity level, dominance etc.. A good Breeder will make recommendations against a particular puppy if they feel it would not be a good fit in their home and what they might be facing if they did choose a particular puppy. However, the new owner have the final decision.

    In a well-bred litter from a responsible breeder, don't worry about getting the last-pick puppy. Each and every puppy in their litters will receive all of the necessary care and attention that they need in order to grow up into happy, secure adults. Also, don't be demanding that you get the "pick" of the litter unless you intend to show the dog (and even that's no guarantee.) You often cannot tell the pick of the litter, until they are much older anyway.

    And in my own personal experience, I do not believe in puppies choosing their new owners....I help with quite a few litters as I spend a lot of time socialising puppy litters of several breeds

    many people say. "Pick the one who runs right up to you and chooses you". But this simply results in the bold and pushy puppies being taken first, while the gentler puppies (who usually make calmer pets!) are pushed out of the way or wait politely in the background, where they are often ignored.
    Most families are making a mistake when they choose bold, vigorous, or energetic puppies who jump all over you. These little dynamos are a blast to play with for an hour at the breeder's, but they can drive you crazy within a day or two in your own home – and they can be more difficult to raise as they mature. especially if you do not have much training experience. These puppies are great for people who look to train forward active dogs.

    Most families do best with a pup who is neither boss of the litter nor lowest on the totem pole. Look for good-natured, middle-of-the-road puppies who don't growl or grab or bite, but who do wag their tails and hold their own.
    Last edited by newfsie; 04-12-2012 at 06:26 AM.
    Pets are forever

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    As with others, I wouldnt be choosing a pup via pictures. That doesnt give you any idea of personality at all.

    But like CavQLD says, and how I get chosen, the right pup with choose you when you are there

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    my most important question in labradors is what are the hip and elbow scores of both parents and can you view the official paperwork. Also is your pup coming with pedigree papers or does this breeder just have 2 papered dogs they're breeding.

    If you cannot get either of these, find a new breeder.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •