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Thread: First Puppy your tips?

  1. #1

    Default First Puppy your tips?

    Hi Everyone,
    I'm New to the forum and to dogs! I'm finally in a position to be able to care for a new addition to the family.

    I've always been smitten by the Chihuahua and I'm viewing a litter tomorrow that will be ready around 12th March.

    So I'am prepared, and don't get caught up in the cuteness of these babies, what are the key questions I should ask?

    If your experienced with the Chihuahua as a breed I'd love to hear your opinions on what to look for/ask whilst viewing them :-)

    Thanks in advance!

    Kim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Adelaide
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    I think the main thing I'd want from a breeder is to meet the parents of the litter to see what their temperment was like - are they calm? happy? anxious? nasty? bonkers? like people (males and females?) etc.

    This is the RSPCA list for a responsible breeder - so I'd be trying to find out if these people met these requirements. Just conversationally.
    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    I'd be looking to avoid anything that suggests puppy farmer. Number one red flag - don't get to meet parent dogs not even the mum. Number two flag - when you ask about health problems the breed might be prone to - the breeder looks at you like they don't understand the question. Number three red flag - if the breeder doesn't offer to take the dog back if you ask "what happens if I can't keep the puppy for any reason?". Ideally you should have a good reason like you have major health problems and no family willing to help. But even if you have a stupid reason, the breeder shouldn't want the dog to stay with someone who doesn't want it any more or risk it being PTS.

    This link has most everything you need to know about choosing and raising a well behaved puppy.
    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    This is the list of genetic diseases reported in Chi. It doesn't make any distinction based on which ones are more common and it is based on USA data so some of the things may not be as common in Oz.
    Disorders by Breed - Chihuahua - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    This page has more specific info on health problems that can occur with Australian Chi
    Facts about Chihuahuas from Chihuahua Rescue Victoria

    If you really want to get to know the chi - find the breed club in your state and go visit them at a dog show or social event.

    If you want a chi from a responsible breeder it can take 12 months or more including how long it takes for the bitch to come in season, be mated, be pregnant and then the puppies to grow up enough to go to new homes - puppies should be at least 8 weeks. Given Chi can be quite frail as puppies, a week or so longer may be good - with you visiting during those extra weeks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Southern NSW
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    nothing left to say after Hya's post

    Welcome to the Forum.........
    Pets are forever

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Socialise, socialise, socialise!! I think a lot of people think that because Chihuahuas are so small they don't need to be taught obedience or socialised. I love all dogs, but I find chihuahuas quite hostile little creatures lol...Also welcome to the forum, and we want lots of photos when you find your little pup!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Welcome to the forum and good luck.

    I will also add...dont molly coddle. Despite the chi's tiny size, it is first and foremost a dog and should be treated the same as any other dog.

  6. #6
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    I agree about the socialising and not mollycoddling. I think one of the most important things with a dog this size is to give them guidance and practice on how to deal with approaching dogs, etc. The world looks very different to them than to bigger dogs or us, so they need to find strategies to deal with that. I have met the rare chi (or cross) who was confident meeting bigger dogs, but they really are the exception.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Adelaide
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    Turid Rugaas - Calming Signals Community

    I love the photo on this page. And the info is very handy too.

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