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Thread: Meet Prince! (Long story, it's been a rough road.)

  1. #11
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    Oh and make sure you take him to the vet for visits, just to say hi to the vet staff, etc, over the next fee weeks. This way his memoriesof the vet will be positive during his critical period instead of painful memories of bloat and surgery it will help with future vet visits.

  2. #12
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    what an awesome looking pup....... glad he is recovering well.........
    Quote Originally Posted by Sean View Post
    I love 2 things in this world. Spandex and reyzor... not necessarily in that order.

  3. #13

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    He is absolutely gorgeous! Very sad that he's already been through so much in his short life, but hopefully the 3 of you now have some great times

    I am more scared than ever about bloat these days, especially since I'm not there for so much of the day.

  4. #14
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    OMG, drooling..- What a beautiful little boy!
    I am so glad for you that he is on the mend now.

    I'm sure we all look forward to seeing more pics as he grows up.

  5. #15

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    Intussusception is not bloat.

    It is when a section of intestine or bowel is telescoping into itself. It can easily be missed as it can slide in and out, causing on again off again symptoms. And unless a vet exam or ultrasound actually catches it in the act (so to speak) it can be, and often is, missed.

    The offending section needs surgical removal.

    A former member on here lost a young Newfie pup to it, diagnosed post mortem, and it was just terrible.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Pawfectionist View Post
    Oh and make sure you take him to the vet for visits, just to say hi to the vet staff, etc, over the next fee weeks. This way his memoriesof the vet will be positive during his critical period instead of painful memories of bloat and surgery it will help with future vet visits.
    He has been to the vets since for a checkup and an injection and seemed fine. (It helps that he loooves the treats the vet gives him!) It is around the corner from my house so once he has had his final injection we will be taking frequent walks to visit!

    It was actually a bit of a double-edged sword when I visited him the day after surgery. I came in and he was happy to see us, looked fine, was playing about... but when we went to leave I was getting all teary eyed and he couldn't give a stuff! Was completely content being carried off in the nurse's arms. LOL. They must have been taking fabulous care of him.

    He's a pretty chill little pup as long as he's used to the environment he's in. We've been very lucky.

    Edit: Nattylou, I thought bloat sounded a little different to what he had. He certainly wasn't displaying anything as bad the the symptoms listed on the chart.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    Intussusception is not bloat.

    It is when a section of intestine or bowel is telescoping into itself. It can easily be missed as it can slide in and out, causing on again off again symptoms. And unless a vet exam or ultrasound actually catches it in the act (so to speak) it can be, and often is, missed.

    The offending section needs surgical removal.

    A former member on here lost a young Newfie pup to it, diagnosed post mortem, and it was just terrible.
    Yes,I should clarify if you call GDV bloat it is...but i call bloat a symptom as do many people now and it can have several causes, so I fully agree but intersusseption can also go straight on to bloat, which is after the intersusseption has caused the blockage...it is just like colic is mentioned in horses, the cause is many things.

    Bloat is a symptom is really a non technical term that can be caused by a few things, most often be it rotation of stomach, blockage in the small bowel or large bowel, intersusseption and twisted bowel. And I am sure even a few more. Bloat is the result of nothing going through because there is a problem. Mostly in large barreled dogs caused by stomach rotation, but it can be further along too (the blockage). Corn cobs are a very common problem in dogs in the USA. because corn on the cob is so common there and the dogs get the leftover cobs from the rubish

    Funnily enough intersusseption is also in humans. Mostly kids under the age of three

    Either rotation of the stomach, bowel or it can cause ischaemia ( no blood supply to the section) of the stomach, small or large bowel. And requires surgery and if ischaemia has occurred removal of the "dead" part.

    I work in a Radiology Department and we have quietly done a few examinations on dogs with these problems for vets (after hours)...I have seen a few different causes and the effects they can cause. We have even treated one intersusseption like we would a human, because it was caught/diagnosed early enough. The dog was sedated and because it was in the large bowel, we used barium under pressure to return the bowel to its normal shape. it is given via a catheter rectally at a reasonable pressure under fluoroscopy guidance.

    This particular dog belonged to the Radiologist..........Not the thing they do on the average dog at the vet clinic.....he is still OK and never required surgery

    It is a shame CT and fluoroscopy is not easily available for all dogs at all vets like in the human world, it would be so much easier to diagnose quickly. It would be great if there were more Veterinary Radiology departments, that would not be so very expensive
    Last edited by newfsie; 02-06-2012 at 07:32 PM.
    Pets are forever

  8. #18

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    I know Newfsie, but your average vet and owner thinks bloat is either a straight up impaction/bloat or a GDV, with severe and immediate symptoms.

    Many vets have never had the misfortune to come across an intussusception and if they were asked whether the usually mild symptoms were a "bloat" would be more likely to dismiss that theory and consider gastric upset or dietary conditions.

    I have a great friend who is an amazing vet and surgeon. After the forum member here lost their pup to intussusception I asked her about it. She had never, in all her busy years of practice, come across it but knew about it we had a decent talk about it. Some months later she met me excitedly for coffee with photos in tow of her first one. She was convinced she thought of it straight away despite very mild symptoms - because we had talked about it. The photos were of the surgery that saved that dog - amazing!

  9. #19
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    I bet she blessed you in her mind that day.........i find it very frustrating going to vets sometimes, because of my knowledge. But a couple have accepted where i work and allow me some opinion now, with Radiologist back-up. That is where I am really lucky, because he loves dogs and will go out of his way to help when we have sick ones (sneak in a CT) and read our X-rays
    Pets are forever

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