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Thread: Toilet training - advice?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default Toilet training - advice?

    I've got a 14 week old Poodle puppy, I've had her for about a week. The breeder said that she was used to going on newspaper, and when I brought her home I put a puppy pad down along with some newspaper in my room (where she sleeps). Ideally I want her to go to the toilet outside - which is always accessible, but I am not quite sure how to get there. She'll go to the toilet a few of the times I take her out a day, but occasionally she'll go on the puppy pee pad, or worse, in my flatmates room.

    I'm wondering what to do, I need to watch her more, I know that, but is having a pee pad inside actually working against me by allowing her somewhere to go inside? Should I just change this to outside only? She doesn't go to the toilet at night, only in the morning and a few times during the day, so I could just take her out more often, and keep a closer eye on her. What do people recommend?

    My flatmate seems to think that I can show her where she went to the toilet and get cross at her and take her outside, but I don't think she would understand this and don't think this is a good way to do it, what is right?

  2. #2
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    I tried the pee pads with mine and they were useless. If you want her to go outside you will need to take her out every 2 hours at least plus after eating and drinking.

    When they go outside reward with happy high voices and get a little excited over it, when they go somewhere you don't want say nothing. It's a bit time consuming but they pick it up in the end. It's also best to not take the pup back inside until they have gone to the toilet.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #3
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    Getting cross won't help at all. Dogs just don't get that at all.

    I think the key is to use lots and lots of praise when she does go outside. And you are supposed to take her out every couple of hours at least and also in the middle of the night (others can give details on this as I've never had a tiny pup). Using a cue is a good thing to do too. We use "weewees". And then when she goes get all exited, and give her treats and pats and take her back inside.

    I think you can leave the pee pad inside if she uses it and it helps to avoid some accidents, just don't praise her for using it. But ideally you don't want to give her a chance to have accidents by anticipating when she has to go and take her outside. If you do this consistently, it won't take long before she will take herself outside.

  4. #4
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    I toilet trained my 4 month (now 6 month) old foster pup in 2 weeks. She had no clue about toilet training when she came to our house.

    I took her outside every hour during the day. In the evenings I crated her. This helps a lot because dogs instinctively don't want to Eliminate in the "den". I would take her out every 2-3 hours during this time. Crating her also helped teach her "quiet time" in the evening.

    Once it was actually bed time, I would take her out and not come in until she had eliminated. I made sure this would happens by timing the toilet trips in the evening.

    As we were progressing, I let her out of the crate in the evenings but confined her to the room I was in, if she was about to have an accident I would say "uh uh" pick her up and take her outside to where I wanted her to go and then waited. Once she went I celebrated with her and we came back inside.

    Things to include:
    - to link a word to toileting, wait until the second your dog begins to eliminate and say the command. Mine is "go pee", this is for either elimination.
    - if you don't catch your dog in the act of elimination inside DO NOT punish. Your dog will not understand and may begin to lose trust in you.
    - set your dog up to succeed. If you can't watch your dog inside, put it outside for a moment while you do what you need, then go outside and play with them before allowing it back inside.

    If you want mre info about it, let me know, as there is more to tell

    Also, as a side note, don't bring the pup in the second it finishes toileting. My foster pup had a habit of going to the toilet, walking off the grass then going back for a second pee. If you go straight back in they will follow you and then per inside :P

    Good luck with the toilet training.

  5. #5
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    Like others have said, frequent visits outside, every hour or two, plus after the pup eats, drinks, wakes from sleeping or stops playing.

    And then repitition, praise and patience.

  6. #6
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    Thank you for your great advice. I'm glad I stood my ground and wouldn't get angry at her, even though my friend swore it worked. Well she doesn't go over night which is great. I go to bed around 11pm, and she goes to sleep and sleeps all night and wakes up 6-7am and I take her straight out and she always goes. I take her out every hour or two, and sometimes she goes sometimes she doesn't.

    She is not crate trained, she has one but she doesn't like it and I feel bad locking her in, especially as she doesn't go to the toilet during the night, its just little times when she wanders off and goes somewhere. I'll have to be more vigilant. Is it normal for a 14 week old not to be fully toilet trained though? Its not too late is it?

  7. #7
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    Toilet training requires you to be vigalent and observant, looking for the tell tail signs - after waking, after eating, every hour or so.

    Close the doors to unused rooms or rooms puppy is not allowed in for a while. Puppies don't generally soil areas they consider theirs, but a house is a large area to a puppy so limit the areas it's allowed in.

    I'm not a big fan of pee pads and only recommend them if puppy is being confined for longer periods of time than you would expect a pup to hold on for.

    In the beginning stages of toilet training I always leave a door to outside open, and if I can't watch puppy it's put outside

    All puppies can be house trainined, some people have a knack for it and others don't and so it just takes a bit longer for puppy to get there but even if you did nothing with time and age most dogs would toilet train themselves, not that I recommend you go down that path, but I say this to encourage you that you'll both get their.

  8. #8
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    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    has loads of good step by step instructions for training your new puppy.

    14 weeks is right on the border of being able to hold on through the night. I think I was getting up at 3am to let my dog out and she didn't get to come in until she'd performed at that age. beats having a mess in the house.

    If you ever act the least bit disappointed about your dog going in the house, you may find it tries to hide when it needs to go, instead of asking to be let out. watch for sniffing and take the dog out immediately.

  9. #9

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    great advice above!

    Rubbing their nose in it and getting crook doesn't work because you haven't caught them in the act so they have no clue why you are angry. Getting up them in the act just makes them think you don't like them going potty in front of you and will hide to go next time.

    Re: Holding all night. I know it makes life easier but please consider your pup is holding for twice as long as they normally would. And then think about how painful it would be for YOU to have to hold on that long. Very uncomfortable.

  10. #10
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    I wouldn't mind getting up in the middle of the night, I'm a light sleeper so I hear if she gets up or walks around, but she sleeps the whole night through, and as soon as she wakes in the morning I get up and take her out. Even when I had pee pad/newspaper in my room overnight she never went.

    So far so good though. I took away the pee pad and yesterday while I wasn't home, my housemate let her in and she peed on some newspaper she found - could be much worse though. And so far today she hasn't peed inside at all! If I see her even looking like she might pee I take her out, and when I was in the shower I just put her outside (with another dog) rather than let her wander. I didn't really like putting her outside too much - but now that she is settled in she doesn't usually cry or anything outside. I used to let her wander around the house a bit but now I keep her in the same room as me always.

    I praise her, and pat her and offer her a treat everytime she pees outside - I just hope she's getting it!

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