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Thread: The Ups & Downs Of Getting a Pup

  1. #81
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    LOl yea at just happening to lose pigmentation on the ears

  2. #82
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    At the end of the day there are more deaf dalmatian pups than competent people what are willing to take it on, there are not enough people to compensate for deaf dalmatians born so that is why they limit the potential for that pup to have a shocking life...if you want a deaf dalmatian go adopt one...but dont put another pup though life deaf to end up in a pound where it most likely would be euthanised anyway very few people are going to want or be able to handle a deaf dally.....unfortunately its few too little.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misschief View Post
    if you want a deaf dalmatian go adopt one.
    But the registered breeders won't allow you to? I said before that it is a sad fact that dogs need owners so if you cannot find a suitable owner, there is no other choice but to PST. My issue with the code of ethics is that they forbid breeders to home a deaf pup even if they would find them a suitable owner who can deal with a pup like that.

    And my question remains about what they are doing to limit the number of deaf dogs being born. Knowingly breeding litters of which 1/3 will need to be PTS seems a bit cruel.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    But the registered breeders won't allow you to? I said before that it is a sad fact that dogs need owners so if you cannot find a suitable owner, there is no other choice but to PST. My issue with the code of ethics is that they forbid breeders to home a deaf pup even if they would find them a suitable owner who can deal with a pup like that.

    And my question remains about what they are doing to limit the number of deaf dogs being born. Knowingly breeding litters of which 1/3 will need to be PTS seems a bit cruel.
    Again, I agree with everything you just said.

    Sure, if a suitable home can't be found then PTS is probably the best option. Bu to have a code of ethics where the breeder is not even allowed to try is far to harsh...in fact, its completely unethical.

    And putting down these pups is clearly not stopping more deaf pups from being born. To be honest, if the issue is that bad that 30% of pups are being put to sleep, then I really dont think they should be bred at all. Breeding dogs where you know 30% of all pups are going to be PTS is wrong IMO.

    And I would even go so far as to say that people wanting to purchase a dally are contributing to the deaths of those 30% of pups. Really no different to the demand for cute oodles contributing to the existance of puppy mills.

    EDIT to add: Misschief, this is in no way aimed at you at all...just generalised comments

  5. #85

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    At the age they are euthed they are already developing, already have personalities, so I don't see why they can't change it to euthed at say 12 weeks if not sold. Or have a very strict homing policy instead like a questionairre and even something like a video the new owner has to sit through to make sure they understand how to care for a deaf dog.

    I do understand the reasons behind it, but IMO it could be done differently. If I had Dallies I wouldn't be joining the breed club that's for sure.

    If the problem lies in the markings or more importantly lack of markings (mostly white dogs) then perhaps they need to look at their breed standard and making more heavily marked dogs acceptable or even make that the standard. From memory heavily marked is frowned upon and patches (ie: whole black ears, legs etc) are disqualified.

  6. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crested_Love View Post
    At the age they are euthed they are already developing, already have personalities, so I don't see why they can't change it to euthed at say 12 weeks if not sold. Or have a very strict homing policy instead like a questionairre and even something like a video the new owner has to sit through to make sure they understand how to care for a deaf dog.

    I do understand the reasons behind it, but IMO it could be done differently. If I had Dallies I wouldn't be joining the breed club that's for sure.

    If the problem lies in the markings or more importantly lack of markings (mostly white dogs) then perhaps they need to look at their breed standard and making more heavily marked dogs acceptable or even make that the standard. From memory heavily marked is frowned upon and patches (ie: whole black ears, legs etc) are disqualified.

    I agree with all that..

    lol

  7. #87
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    On the weekend three of my 10 week old Whippet puppies went to climb on Gemma (6yo Gordon Setter) who was laying on her side on the ground, she growled at them and they acted appropriately with their body language and moved off and away from her.

    What if one had been deaf?

    It would immediately live a different life here in order to stay safe.

    And what's a good enough home?

    The older a pup gets the harder it is to part with.

    & lets not forget the code of ethics is the breed clubs, not every breeder joins their breed club.

    I don't know how many people here own a deaf dog (born deaf), but I for one wouldn't, even if I was rescuing I wouldn't take a dog because I felt sorry for it.

  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAC View Post
    On the weekend three of my 10 week old Whippet puppies went to climb on Gemma (6yo Gordon Setter) who was laying on her side on the ground, she growled at them and they acted appropriately with their body language and moved off and away from her.

    What if one had been deaf?

    It would immediately live a different life here in order to stay safe.

    And what's a good enough home?

    The older a pup gets the harder it is to part with.

    & lets not forget the code of ethics is the breed clubs, not every breeder joins their breed club.

    I don't know how many people here own a deaf dog (born deaf), but I for one wouldn't, even if I was rescuing I wouldn't take a dog because I felt sorry for it.
    As I mentioned before, I am sure it takes a pretty special person to raise a deaf dog. Which is why it is unlikely that all 30% of deaf born pups would be able to be homed. But there are people out there who own deaf dogs and are coping fine with them. So why have a blanket rule that the pups HAVE to be PTS?

    And again, 30% deaf pups is hardly ethical breeding.

  9. #89
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    There is not a blanket rule. Only those breeders who are part of the breed club need to follow the rule.

    I have three different breeds here and am only a member of two of the breed clubs.

    When I bred Kelpies I was never a member of the club.

    The Deaf Dal problem from my understanding of it is not straight forward. Hopefuly I'm going to find out more about it after Wednesday nights training where I'll be getting a lesson on polygenic inheritance, meaning it's variable, as variable as height is in humans. So this range of deafness is possibly the cause for the high amount of deaf Dals and why it is not easy to breed out.
    Last edited by MAC; 10-25-2011 at 10:54 AM.

  10. #90
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    I would own a deaf dog and it wouldnt have anything to do with feeling sorry for it.

    In regards to the pups backing off from the older dog, there are other signals that would have been used along with the growl and a deaf pup would learn based on the other signals.

    Deaf dogs arent as difficult as everyone wants to make out so they can defend what is basically a murderous code of ethics. I am not saying they are "easy" but they arent that hard either

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