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Thread: The Ups & Downs Of Getting a Pup

  1. #61
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    There are people out there who choose to differ. A google on 'deaf dalmatian' tells me there are rescue orgs all over the world rescueing deaf dalmatians from unregistered breeders and finding them homes. And there seem to be plenty of success stories about these placements.

    Don't get me wrong, I am not saying at all that you or just anyone should adopt a deaf dally! I am sure that it would require a pretty special person to train them. (I'm also not saying you are not special, but you know what I mean?! ) But they are out there and doing a great job.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misschief View Post
    Hahah try training a perfectly hearing dally first...I have spoken to alot of trainers and when i mention I have a dally they all say the same thing.. good luck with that one or his gonna be alot of work..and thats with perfectly good hearing.. they are a breed that are not for everyone but one I am familiar with...im familiar with alot of breeds and dallys I apologise but they do take the cake for independant minded.
    Unfortunatly in this situation you need to think with your head and not with your heart......there have obviously been way to many people thinking they can take on a deaf dally and as a result this code of ethics had to be put in place.
    We have three dally's here at training and they are really good at obedience (titled to CD) and agility. So I never considered them to be bad for obedience
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  4. #64
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    I dont care how many different spins people keep trying to put on it, or how it might possibly look OK, putting a dog down because it is deaf is never going to be acceptable in my opinion.

    If the ratio of deaf to hearing pups is so high, then perhaps they shouldnt be breeding dallys at all.

  5. #65

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    I'm not a dog breeder so it probably isn't my place to comment regarding puppy deafness. But my 5 cents worth anyway from the perspective of a small domestic companion animal breeder:

    Emotionally, I don't like the idea, it seems unfair. I'd be really upset if the puppy I was promised turned out to have a defect and my first insinct would be to take it anyway and I'll learn to deal with the consequences.

    Realistically, taking into account the bigger picture it is probably for the best.
    There is already an oversupply of dogs without disability deserving of a home being euthanised every day for no good reason other than there just aren't enough homes to support so many. Yep perfectly good dallys end up in rescue too.
    There is no need to intentionally release a special needs animal that is more than likely not going to enjoy the same quality of life if it were born without a defect.

    Ethically breeding any animal isn't for the feint hearted. It can be both very rewarding and extreemly heartbreaking at the same time.
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  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    We have three dally's here at training and they are really good at obedience (titled to CD) and agility. So I never considered them to be bad for obedience
    Im not saying they are bad im saying they are pretty difficult, alot have breeders have commended his decision and I accept that everyone is entitled to their opinion.

  7. #67
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    I do get where you are coming from. But shelters are full of dogs with much worse issues than a deaf pup would have. Yet the RSPCA and rescue orgs don't give up on those that may be hard to rehabilitate or need an experienced owner.

    I also do not agree that their deafness would affect their quality of life that much at all. It's worse for humans because we rely a lot more on sound to communicate. Yet most deaf people lead fulfilling lives. I've seen totally blind dogs that seemed perfectly happy. I also meet 3-legged dogs regularly and none ever struck me as unhappy or having a poor quality of life.

    And I do acknowledge that it could be hard to find homes for all 30% of dallies that are currently born deaf. If you cannot find a home, there is no other choice than to PTS, which is indeed a sad fact of life as dogs need owners. But to have a rule that you cannot even try to place them, seems OTT to me.

    Also, if 30% of dallies are being born deaf, what is being done to try and reduce that number, apart from not breeding the deaf ones? Why are you allowed to breed at all from dogs that produce a high percentage of deaf pups? Or any deaf pups even?

    You may argue that to put the pups down is the ethical thing to do. I would argue that preventing deaf pups from being born would be more ethical.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    I do get where you are coming from. But shelters are full of dogs with much worse issues than a deaf pup would have. Yet the RSPCA and rescue orgs don't give up on those that may be hard to rehabilitate or need an experienced owner.

    I also do not agree that their deafness would affect their quality of life that much at all. It's worse for humans because we rely a lot more on sound to communicate. Yet most deaf people lead fulfilling lives. I've seen totally blind dogs that seemed perfectly happy. I also meet 3-legged dogs regularly and none ever struck me as unhappy or having a poor quality of life.

    And I do acknowledge that it could be hard to find homes for all 30% of dallies that are currently born deaf. If you cannot find a home, there is no other choice than to PTS, which is indeed a sad fact of life as dogs need owners. But to have a rule that you cannot even try to place them, seems OTT to me.

    Also, if 30% of dallies are being born deaf, what is being done to try and reduce that number, apart from not breeding the deaf ones? Why are you allowed to breed at all from dogs that produce a high percentage of deaf pups? Or any deaf pups even?

    You may argue that to put the pups down is the ethical thing to do. I would argue that preventing deaf pups from being born would be more ethical.
    I agree with everything you just said

  9. #69
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    Yes shelters are full of dogs. As humans we still persist in saving the more difficult ones.

    If a dog with 3 legs is advertised in a shelter it always gets a lot of interest, while it's 4 legged companion is overlooked. We'll spend an enormous amount of time and resources on it, while other healthy dogs are overlooked.

    Yes there are dedicated owners willing to put their all into a deaf Dal and we hear about the successes and I congratulate those owners. But what about the ones that didn't make it. If every single Dal Breeder kept or tried to find a home for every deaf puppy how successful would the statistics be then. With the clubs stance on this only a portion of the deaf dogs born are out there.

    Dal breeders and buyers have a choice what they support. As a non Dal Breeder or owner I don't feel I have the right to say whats wrong and whats right without first being more involved at the grass roots level not just as an observer.

  10. #70

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    Actually I'm not all that surprised practices such as this still do exist. I'm sure other breeds have it too.

    At the end of the day it comes back to an individual's own ethical principles. Everyone has their limits and I'm sure most dog owners will have at least one or two breeds they wouldn't own because of issues regarding health, aesthetics or breeding practice.

    Ideally the club's perspective should reduce the number of defective animals being produced. I don't know how well it has worked, obviously it is still a significant issue which they clearly take seriously.


    MAC has a fair point, I'll agree the sad cases get more interest than the regular pound mutt with all parts in working order and no extrodinary story of survival against the odds.
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