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Thread: The Ups & Downs Of Getting a Pup

  1. #151

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog_Lover View Post
    Am I aloud to ask you to pull whatever it is you have up you ass out?

    Wait I just did!!

    Only pathetic little keyboard warriors try to get their point across with insults and rude remarks!
    You can ask, but as there's nothing up there you'll be rather disappointed!

    I'd say the same thing straight to your face BDL. No hesitation at all.

    My observation... Evidently you didn't comprehend what I was saying, it was clear from what you posted. You want to take it as an insult that's your load to bear.

  2. #152

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    I just wanted to ask....

    How many of you on here have ever dealt with a completely deaf dog? .....Beloz? Choppa? BDL? Lala?

    Well I have. I rescued a completely deaf Staffy X ACD (BTW ACD are another breed who regularly are born deaf). She turned out to have separation anxiety compounded (and probably caused) by the fact that she was deaf, you couldn't leave her sight without her losing her sh*t because she couldn't hear you. She broke out of a crate and destroyed the inside of a vet clinic whilst staying there overnight. She was extremely hard to deal with, hard to train, hard to calm down and very very loud.

    She was transferred to rescue organization in NSW. The fosters who took her were well aware of the issues and were experienced with dealing with problem dogs, she went through 2 foster homes who couldn't deal with her until she landed with Chipps (a member of this forum) who had her for about a week when she found a potential forever home, she went on 2 week trial, they called a week in and said they would be keeping her, 2 weeks on from that they were not dealing with her and were struggling, she went back to Chipps, sadly she was aggressive with other dogs (another issue probably caused by her anxiety/deafness) and on Monday she was PTS. She was an unhappy, anxious, stressed dog who was put through constant change and instability because of her issues. Most of her issues would have been able to modified quickly (or probably wouldn't have even existed) if it had not been for her deafness.

    So as you can see even people who are well aware of a dogs situation and who think they can handle it often cannot, I won't even go into the actually time you need to dedicate to training, socialising and de-sensitizing a deaf dog, it takes an dedicated person with lots of spare time to give them what they need. This is how dogs end up passed around or in shelters. For a dog who is deaf that is an extremely stressful situation and their behaviour will deteriorate.

    It is all well and good for you to sit here with no experience with a deaf dog and say the dog should go to someone who is willing to take it but it is another thing altogether when you have experienced a deaf dog.
    Last edited by Keira & Phoenix; 11-03-2011 at 10:56 AM.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by AngelanBatty View Post
    You can ask, but as there's nothing up there you'll be rather disappointed!

    I'd say the same thing straight to your face BDL. No hesitation at all.

    My observation... Evidently you didn't comprehend what I was saying, it was clear from what you posted. You want to take it as an insult that's your load to bear.
    You think that makes you a big person because you would be a bitch in person aswell as online? I'm sorry to say but it doesn't!

    You can get your point across without trying to put people down, I'm not sure if your parents forgot to teach you that but in the ADULT world that's what you do.

    I don't have a deaf dog, I have never met a deaf dog, would I own one? Maybe, if I knew more about how to train one etc The fact is its sad, its sad to put down a one legged, one eyes, death blind or perfectly healthy dog. All I find just as sad as the other!

    Why is that so hard for you to swallow?
    Rubylisious


  4. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    I just wanted to ask....

    How many of you on here have ever dealt with a completely deaf dog? .....Beloz? Choppa? BDL? Lala?

    Well I have. I rescued a completely deaf Staffy X ACD (BTW ACD are another breed who regularly are born deaf). She turned out to have separation anxiety compounded (and probably caused) by the fact that she was deaf, you couldn't leave her sight without her losing her sh*t because she couldn't hear you. She broke out of a crate and destroyed the inside of a vet clinic whilst staying there overnight. She was extremely hard to deal with, hard to train, hard to calm down and very very loud.

    She was transferred to rescue organization in NSW. The fosters who took her were well aware of the issues and were experienced with dealing with problem dogs, she went through 2 foster homes who couldn't deal with her until she landed with Chipps (a member of this forum) who had her for about a week when she found a potential forever home, she went on 2 week trial, they called a week in and said they would be keeping her, 2 weeks on from that they were not dealing with her and were struggling, she went back to Chipps, sadly she was aggressive with other dogs (another issue probably caused by her anxiety/deafness) and on Monday she was PTS. She was an unhappy, anxious, stressed dog who was put through constant change and instability because of her issues. Most of her issues would have been able to modified quickly (or probably wouldn't have even existed) if it had not been for her deafness.

    So as you can see even people who are well aware of a dogs situation and who think they can handle it often cannot, I won't even go into the actually time you need to dedicate to training, socialising and de-sensitizing a deaf dog, it takes an dedicated person with lots of spare time to give them what they need. This is how dogs end up passed around or in shelters. For a dog who is deaf that is an extremely stressful situation and their behaviour will deteriorate.

    It is all well and good for you to sit here with no experience with a deaf dog and say the dog should go to someone who is willing to take it but it is another thing altogether when you have experienced a deaf dog.
    This has already been discussed ad nauseum. I have mentioned about 3 times at least that I would not take on a deaf dog because I do not regard myself as an experienced enough dog owner/trainer. I have mentioned several times that it would take a pretty special person to be able to meet a deaf dog's needs. There are success stories out there of people who have managed to do that. They are few and far between.

    Which is all the more reason to stop breeding deaf dogs.

    Dalmatians with larger patches - as opposed to the typical spots - have significantly less chance of being deaf. Simple fix to the problem, I would think. Any breeder could easily favour patchy dals for breeding and the deafness figures would plummet in no time and thus the numbers of pups being put down. Unfortunately these patchy dals do not meet show standards, so they are not used for breeding by registered breeders. Because obviously their appearance is so much more important than their hearing, right?

  5. #155
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    K & P - I have heard plenty of the same stories about dogs that have their hearing.. I can imagine you being in rescue you would have heard many tales about feral aggressive dogs etc

    They all need alot of time, experience and knowledge of the breed and the condition. Exactly like a deaf dog.
    Rubylisious


  6. #156

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog_Lover View Post
    You think that makes you a big person because you would be a bitch in person aswell as online? I'm sorry to say but it doesn't!

    You can get your point across without trying to put people down, I'm not sure if your parents forgot to teach you that but in the ADULT world that's what you do.

    I don't have a deaf dog, I have never met a deaf dog, would I own one? Maybe, if I knew more about how to train one etc The fact is its sad, its sad to put down a one legged, one eyes, death blind or perfectly healthy dog. All I find just as sad as the other!

    Why is that so hard for you to swallow?
    You're not the only one who finds it sad BDL. I find it MORE sad when completely healthy dogs get pts for no other reason than people can't be bothered being responsible.

    Nope, I know I'm not a big person... I'm really short actually! Not sure what you're sorry for?? I don't get bitchy unless I am provoked into it. The single mindedness that has gone on here in this thread has provoked it...

    Given that my parents had very little to do with my upbringing perhaps you should watch your step there.

    To be very crude, it is completely f***ed up that ANY dog is PTS. At least the breeder is being responsible. Following the RULES set down for them and doing the RIGHT THING in accordance with those rules and regulations.

    I know for a fact that I would not ever have a deaf dog - fair enough one that goes deaf with age, that is a different kettle of fish IMO.

  7. #157

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog_Lover View Post
    You think that makes you a big person because you would be a bitch in person aswell as online? I'm sorry to say but it doesn't!

    You can get your point across without trying to put people down, I'm not sure if your parents forgot to teach you that but in the ADULT world that's what you do.

    I don't have a deaf dog, I have never met a deaf dog, would I own one? Maybe, if I knew more about how to train one etc The fact is its sad, its sad to put down a one legged, one eyes, death blind or perfectly healthy dog. All I find just as sad as the other!

    Why is that so hard for you to swallow?
    Of course it is sad to put dogs down, it will always be sad. No one is saying it isn't sad. What we have said is it is sometimes in the best interests of the dog. Like the dog in my last post whose life was filled with stress and anxiety, she wasn't living a happy life anymore.
    And I would much rather rescues spend their time and money on rescuing, fostering and rehabilitating happy and healthy dogs over disabled dogs. Ideally we could rescue all dogs but the reality is we can't. And healthy dogs have more of a chance of not being returned to the shelter or rescue, of living a happy and longer life.

  8. #158
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    Just like to add to K&P's post...

    I am not overly experienced with deaf dogs. Sure I dealt with them in a past occupation, but my home environment is a whole new ball game.


    I was not ready for her to return, made huge concessions with my own dogs, tried my hardest to understand and learn the skills she needed for rehabilitation.

    She was loved by many, supported by even more, but when it came to the crunch, people made excuses, people ran a mile.....All to difficult, time consuming and frustrating. Or those judgemental types that offered unwelcome advice and criticism for my ability.


    Bottom line is the the dog had potential, dog is now dead.

    I held her during the procedure, spoke soft words and kissed her head as she died, such a beautiful little girl that deserved better, but the right owner never came forward when she most needed them.



    Back on topic...

    If there is a demand for Dalmatians, then give the breeders a chance to learn and breed out the deaf pups.

    I would hope they also dislike the culling of deaf pups, but I accept they have to make a choice based on the minefield of re-homing, availability of suitable homes, as well as economics and breed improvement.

    There is no magical queue waiting for deaf Dally pups.
    There are very few homes for them.
    There are very few homes for any breed or cross breed that is deaf..
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v450/Chippo/Dogsx4blackbackground.jpg
    ... Jade ...

    Aha yeah me too! wee wee or pee pee and poo poo's or poopie

  9. #159
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    There are not enough "Special" people end of story..... I dont know why people are arguing the point, its simple, there is a defective gene that can be bred out over time.. its not "culling" it is evolution, if you remove the deaf dogs you wont ever get a deaf dog eventually.... it is 12% of dalmatians that are born deaf.
    There are people who would take them on and do a good job.. but as I've stated there are not enough of those people.... breeders and vets are doing the correct thing taking over where nature cant.... as a breeder you have a moral right and obligation to sell and produce from only the healthiest of the breed.... in dalmatians a deaf dog is not healthy and if a breeder sells an unhealthy dog they are then an irrisponsible breeder, it is the same as selling a pup with 3 legs, 1 eye, you need to draw the line somewhere....uni lateral dallys are being sold but not bred from I think that is even very lenient.

  10. #160
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    Ok well this thread took a hugggeee turn..

    I have delt with two deaf dogs both bulldogs, who with time and patience were amazingly behaved. Yet it did take a special person to teach them.. but the point is those people were given the chance to train them. No one is being given the chance to train the (registered) deaf dallies.

    And I dont see why its been made out the dallies are sooooooo hard to train. I would have though more high strung dogs such as GSP's, Kelpies, Vizlas, Weimeraners etc would be harder to train. Our current next door neighbours have a dally (about 4 i think) who is generally not the best behaved dog.. but the worst? no way by far.

    And generally those dallies I've met havnt been that badly behaved. Am I missing something? Are they like the 'impossible' breed of the dog world. Because I'm pretty sure they're just like any other high strung dog.. so if other deaf high strung dogs can be trained why cant these?

    And I believe that something else needs to be bred in.. As obviously what they're trying isnt working. A 30% deaf rate (so pts rate) is way to high for the human race just to pleasure itself in seeing white spotty dogs running around.

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