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Thread: Puppy Classes

  1. #1

    Default Puppy Classes

    I did look back to see if there has been a thread about this, but I couldn't see it. Yes ladies you can say I had a mans look. I just couldn't see it there so I thought I would do a post about it.

    Murphy and me are heading out on Thursday night at 8pm to do puppy classes.
    I have never done them before with any dog, so I don't know what I am in for.
    I am thinking that it is so he can meet and greet other dogs that may or may now be the same breed as him. And it will give him the chance to play with them and in this play it may hopefully stop him from getting into fights with other dog later down the track.
    I don't know if this is so or if I have got it right.

    So if you know what they are about please let me know.
    I do know that these things now are one thing on the top of the list when you bring home your new pup.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Inner West Sydney
    Posts
    164

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    I went to one provided by a nearby vet... Now being more informed, it was actually putting my puppy at high risk of contracting something from the clinic. Anyway, I found the puppy class... disappointing. Milo was regarded as one of the "bigger" puppies, and was seperated with the other big pups in the class, so he didn't really get a chance to socialise with the smaller puppies. Only those of the same size or bigger. Luckily, one of my friends soon got a mini foxie X puppy so he was able to learn how to play with smaller breeds. I don't know if Milo's still young and doesn't know much yet (10 months old), but he still can't tell when a dog is telling him to back off... He still rushes in to play with them, despite them barking, growling and snapping.
    In the 1 hour, Milo was only allowed to play with the other puppies for about 15 minutes. The rest of the hour was spent on the instructor educating us about the basics of owning a dog - feeding, grooming, flea treatment/wormers, etc. I'd say a good 20 minutes was spent on teaching a recommended method of teaching basic commands, and putting that into practice then and there.

    There was this aussie cattle dog that would not stop barking and was fairly rough in his play. He spent literally 45 minutes outside, not in the class because he was too loud. And the 15 minutes spent with socialisation, he was on leash and almost isolated from other dogs. So for this puppy, the puppy class did not help him at all as he wasn't even in there for most of the time.

  3. #3

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    That is sad. I think Murphy will have to go into the larger sized pups as he is over 10 kilos at 14 weeks. So he is a big boy but not in height though.
    And I don't want them to tell me how to train him as I know I can do it on my own and with Obedience lesson which we will do later.
    I hope this isn't a waste of time and money. Which is hard to come by.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Inner West Sydney
    Posts
    164

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    I thought it was a waste of money. I already taught Milo all the basic commands before puppy class because I got him during the Christmas period when everyone was on holiday. I also had a few friends who got puppies around the same time. The breeder of Milo already covered the basic knowledge of owning a dog.

    But then again, I am a first time dog owner, and getting all these clarification on nuturing a dogs growth was beneficial.

  5. #5

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    We have had dogs for a long time but we have never had puppy classes.
    So I thought this could be good for him.
    I don't want to go there to be told how to sit and heel plus all the others.
    I am doing that on my own now and will do more as he ages.
    So if it is like this I maybe the one to walk out on it no matter the money.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Southern NSW
    Posts
    3,784

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    I take puppy classes and I think it is important for socialisation...i do not allow free for all. We teach pups, beginner dogs to be polite on lead and teach how to meet and greet. Once the puppies have done some of that we play games. Mostly with luring and such. After they are a little tired we allow some of them off lead, to see how they go. I tend to pick them in turns as to how i see they are. I do not go by size but by temperament. Katy also goes she is the big dog and the demo dog. She loves the puppies and is very tolerant. I like the whole family to come with the puppies so that all the puppies can meet lots of people of different size, age and nationality. To me it is all about socialisation and manners. We also teach luring, sit, drop, heel and loose lead walking. plus if time and good puppies some tricks.
    It should be fun, but I have been to puppy classes where they all run around madly and boisterous puppies bully little ones. I don't like that.
    Most of all it should be fun and help the puppy along
    Pets are forever

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
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    IMO puppy school should be about teaching the owners basic care skills as well as foundation training practices. I don't actually agree that it should be about teaching the pup to 'play' with other dogs- he or she really ought to have learned that from mum and litter mates. Again, IMO, puppy school should be about appropriate socialising, and to my mind that means understanding that the presence of other dogs does not equal play.

    In addition, I believe that the 8-16 week period as a primary socialization period should be about bonding with the family (or pack if you like the word)... Not every other dog. I am of the opinion that dogs taught that the presence of other dogs equals play during this highly sensitive period makes it harder, post 16 weeks to train focus and attention in the presence of other dogs as distraction.

    Remember- what you teach before 16 weeks is lifelong, anything after will always come second to the learning from that highly formative period.

    Then again, I must state that I don't believe my dogs need to play with other dogs outside my family/ pack. I believe that I am responsible for mental and physical stimulation (including play), and it is quite sufficient for my dog to play with my other dog- assuming I have two at once. I want my dog to see other dogs as just a fact of life, and me as the giver of all good things.

    But just my opinion.

  8. #8

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    I think one of the best things about owning a dog is watching them play with other dogs. It does two things.....

    It releases pressure- dogs that play and interact with other dogs seem to be more free to then concentrate on their owner around other dogs. We all know that we learn better when it is mixed with some 'free time'.

    Second, dogs that are restricted from playing with other dogs tend to 'forget' about canine body language. Socialisation is a life long lesson for dogs- they cannot get this from us no matter how hard we try.

    I think a balance is important, play/interact with some dogs, but not every dog you pass.

    Having said that, I never recommend going to the off lead park/puppy school and standing around with your dog in a free-for-all play session with no structure, this is so counter productive to appropriate play and socialisation. This is where some puppy schools go wrong.

    If you feel uncomfortable during socialisation move out of the group with your dog, give your dog some space to settle down.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
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    743

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    Quote Originally Posted by doglifetraining View Post

    Second, dogs that are restricted from playing with other dogs tend to 'forget' about canine body language. Socialisation is a life long lesson for dogs- they cannot get this from us no matter how hard we try.
    .
    DLT: can you please point me towards something instructive on this point? It is an accepted fact amongst the training community that learning between 3-16 weeks is permanent. And the most formative period in terms of canine interaction (the canine socialisation period) runs from about 3-7 weeks of age. Unless you have a pup removed from mother and littermates prior to 7 weeks and with Incomplete Canine Association, then this is where dog- dog interaction is learnt.

    I do not believe social manners are 'forgotten' through lack of use. No- I think this apparent forgetfulness is linked to human handler error.

    I agree a dog needs lifelong socialisation, though, and I certainly don't mean that a dog can never be permitted to play with another dog, but I do not agree that unstructured dog-dog play is necessary for a well balanced, well socialized dog.

  10. #10

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    Just started Murphy on crawling.
    And he done real well seeing it was my first attempt at doing this with him.
    I have seen him do it on his own. So I knew he can do it just needed the right command to put it into practise.

    Had our granddaughter here and the youngest one is dog scared and cry's as soon as he get close.
    So I got out my treat bag for his training and gave them to the little one and she began to give them to him and soon her hand was in his mouth. And no tears.
    But this was only lesson 1 for them both heaps more to go to get them both happy with each other. Murphy just loves the kids so its our little girl that needs to confidence to have him and her in the same room. But it was encourging to see this progress today.

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