Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 47

Thread: Puppy Classes

  1. #11

    Default Brain Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    DLT: can you please point me towards something instructive on this point? It is an accepted fact amongst the training community that learning between 3-16 weeks is permanent. And the most formative period in terms of canine interaction (the canine socialisation period) runs from about 3-7 weeks of age.
    It's basic neurology- pathways between neurons become stronger as skills are practiced. Pathways are shed as practice stops or slows. Yes, your dog will still retain a knowledge of a skill without practice, but will never be proficient at it. I want my dog (and other dogs for that matter) to be proficient at communicating with other dogs, so I let him interact/play appropriately with as many dogs as possible every day.

    You are absolutely correct, intense brain development/growth occurs up to 16 weeks in dogs. But, so many changes also happen in the first three years of a dogs life (when they reach social maturity) and unless skills are practiced every day your dog will shed those neurons that it started with when it was a baby.

    This is just one quote I found.....
    "A primary purpose of education is to stimulate more pathways in the brain so that more neurons are used and pathways are able to handle additional traffic."
    From......
    Articles on Brain based Education

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Gippsland, Victoria
    Posts
    743

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by doglifetraining View Post
    It's basic neurology- pathways between neurons become stronger as skills are practiced. Pathways are shed as practice stops or slows. Yes, your dog will still retain a knowledge of a skill without practice, but will never be proficient at it. I want my dog (and other dogs for that matter) to be proficient at communicating with other dogs, so I let him interact/play appropriately with as many dogs as possible every day.

    You are absolutely correct, intense brain development/growth occurs up to 16 weeks in dogs. But, so many changes also happen in the first three years of a dogs life (when they reach social maturity) and unless skills are practiced every day your dog will shed those neurons that it started with when it was a baby.

    This is just one quote I found.....
    "A primary purpose of education is to stimulate more pathways in the brain so that more neurons are used and pathways are able to handle additional traffic."
    From......
    Articles on Brain based Education
    Hmmmmm, but that article is about human neurology and brain development. Human brains take 25 years to reach full maturity as opposed to weeks in a dog. I'm not saying it doesn't apply, but would like to see a dog related study for data and comparison.

    Of course, I can see we are coming from two different viewpoints; I see no need for my dog to see other dogs as anything other than things in the world.
    I simply don't see any need (or desirability) for interaction outside my 'family'. So we agree to disagree :-)

    I will say, however, that when I added a new dog to my single dog family, the existing dog had not interacted with any other dog between leaving his littermates and her arrival almost 2.5 years later- when given the go ahead to meet and greet he displayed appropriate greeting manners naturally and instantly. For sure, one experience does not a general rule make, but I'm not yet convinced sufficiently to alter my view.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

    Default

    I still remember when my minis showed "velcro" tendency with rather polite manner at the school. I suppose we walked to the school so by the time when the class started my dog was very much into learning as he burnt some energy already. I must admit most puppies there were just happy to play initially and nobody (myself included) seemed to mind about that either. We learnt to do basic things such as sit/drop/stay/come etc. I did not teach any of those prior so the training was very useful and provided basics for future obedience training. I practised at home often though. We also learnt about basic health related matters but felt that they were more had to do with the vet hosp....As gift we received a towel/a few month pet insurance, treats, information handouts with a folder, certificate, graduation test and photograph with a frame.....yes some samples. In general I think the puppy school was a reasonable investment for my minis.
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

  4. #14

    Default

    This is so interesting getting different view point on this.
    And if anything this has got a good discusion going.
    In the beginning I was thinking that this might be the biggest waste of time out.
    Now I am not too sure at all. I will be going anyway and if it isn't for me.
    Then so be it.
    but I have got a better view of things that are going on in the development of my boy and this is and does go for other pups out there about to start this.
    I really thank everyone for their input on this subject.

    Has it made the decision to go or not to go easier? No it has made me think even harder on this matter. I think I was going into it so that Murphy will have a little more socialization skills to his belt than any other one of my dogs. And if this makes his life better then this is good. I will monitor it from start to finish and if I see he can't handle it I will drop it like getting a cold.

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Villain & Flirtt View Post
    So we agree to disagree :-)
    Agree to disagree Thanks for discussing constructively with me.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Personally, I think you cannot introduce your puppy and dog to enough different dogs and people. My view is that dogs enjoy and are entitled to a social life outside the home. When they go out they can smell all these other dogs and they seem to have a natural curiosity about them. And there are so many different personalities out there that require different ways of interacting with, just like with people.

    As far as dogs greeting other dogs go, there are the stalkers, the chargers, the starers, the circlers, the barkers,... And of course big, little, heavy, light... I am watching my 10mo deal with all these different types on our walks and I expect she'll experiment with different ways to interact with them all. A little fluffy white dog snapped at her yesterday because she didn't back off when its body language showed it was scared. Things like that are good learning experiences.

    Even when you don't let your dog go up to other dogs when they're off the lead - which personally I find a missed opportunity for mental and physical exercise - there will be situations where interaction cannot be avoided and experience with their own litter and housemates may not have taught them enough about how to respond to some dogs.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    203

    Default

    I totally agree that you cannot introduce your dog to too many people or dogs BUT I do not believe in off-lead socialization, for many reasons.
    1. Puppies can communicate quite fine with a lead on
    2. If the all pups have a lead you can break up any fight / bad manners very quickly
    3. You still have good control of your pup and can still teach them right from wrong manners around other dogs
    4. I have NEVER met a trainer, vet or behaviorist that I would rely on to be able to keep an eye on and read 3 or more puppies at once (who are all running around like idiots)

    That being said of course it is important for dogs to learn appropriate play as well so I allow my dogs to play with dogs that are friends of mine and that I will see often so they form a friendship and learn to play well with each other.
    Also on that I don't like the idea of my dog being overly friendly with every dog they see on the street as NOT every dog is friendly in return. I prefer my dogs to ignore any dogs they don't know so if they ever do get out without my supervision HOPEFULLY they will stay within their pack and ignore any other dogs they might come across.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn't merely try to train him to be semihuman. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming partly a dog." - Edward Hoagland

  8. #18

    Default

    When I take Murphy i will be taking his treat bag.
    I don't think he will be the one to start anything, but I know he won't back down.
    He is strong minded and knows what he can and can't do but tries all the same.
    We had him with next doors dog who doesn't like other dogs.
    And he tried to push Murphy who was on the lead around a little but Murphy just stood there.
    As he already outweights him so he had the weight to stop this dog from being too pushy.
    I thought that Murphy handled himself really well and he still listened to direction while the other dog didn't. And that dog is a Malteze cross dog and about 3 years old.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,290

    Default

    Murphy sounds like a clever dog. Dealing with small anti-social dog is definitely a good skill to learn for a pup!

  10. #20

    Default

    This is so right and this is why I really want to go over and above all else.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •