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Thread: Vegetables for the Pup?

  1. #41
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    My Misty loves to eat raw vegies, carrot, potatoe, cabbage, caulie, she is at my feet when I'm preparing the meal waiting for those bits to fall on the floor, (accidentely of course) but the strange thing she does is that she grazes on the grass outside, not just a bit of grass like other dogs, she literally grazes like a sheep or a cow. The vet was at out place one day and watched her, said he hadn't seen anything like it before. We've decided it is a behavioral thing which is what it seems to be, certainly doesn't seem to bother her.

  2. #42
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    Aug 2009
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    I won't let my dog be at my feet when I'm cutting up vegies.

    For starters I have been known to drop the knife on the floor.

    For seconds - I usually have a hot pan and boiling water - and if there is a doggy helping the dog is likely to wear it.

    I make my dog sit on a mat outside the boiling water and drop knife zone - and take what falls on the floor to her or give her some direct from the chopping board.

  3. #43
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    I agree with you Hyacinth, I am very careful with the knives, when I say she's at my feet I don't mean exactly at my feet, if I dropped a knife it would be my feet that would cop it, as for boiling water, no one, child or animal is near me if I'm handling boiling water. I definitely agree it's too dangerous, like I said, the vegies get dropped incidentally (on purpose of course) lol. Good point though.

  4. #44
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    I think bull just wants to argue about anything to be honest. First it was trying to say I feel preservatives are a good thing and now it is trying to say I don't think dogs should be given bones. Whatever though. I really couldn't be bothered with it.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  5. #45
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    Misty, our Pugs all do the same and clamber around my husbands feet as he is preparing dinner.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  6. #46

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    Most of the dogs know very well to stay out of the kitchen unless invited in. The exception was Loppy,she was at me feet no matter the place and Tonk tries but now has learnt not to bother unless he hears the fridge door open or the treat box rattle
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  7. #47
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    Dec 2011
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    mid north coast nsw
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    it's been interesting reading through this topic and to hear people's opinions on what is 'best' - very informative - on the subject of nutrition as well as human interaction! ;-)

    we've had dogs for 27 years, the first one we gave a home to when he was 18mths old. he'd spent his first 18mths on a diet of cocoa pops and icecream! all his tablets were rolled into a spoon of butter to make them easier to push down his throat! the lovely ladies who gave him to us even gave us an unopened box of cocoa pops - which WE ate, bugger the dog!! lol he then spent the remainder of his 12 years on meatybites and cans of pal, with bones and table scraps thrown in as well. probably not the best that we could have offered, but definitely an improvement on his original diet.

    we continued with the bought supermarket foods for many years and many dogs without problems.

    it's only in the past 10 years - due to financial considerations - that our dogs started on home-cooked meals. when i peel the vegies for OUR dinner, i put the peels into the freezer - along with meat scraps, leftover foods that have been in the fridge for too long, veges that have gone soft with age in the vege crisper....in other words, what i won't feed to my family i feed to my dogs. every 6 weeks i cook a huge boiler of these scraps, teem it with mince from the butcher and rice and freeze it into meal portions. in the morning the dog still gets a cup of kibble - in the belief that he's getting nutrients that's not present in my cooked stuff. he then gets the cooked stuff for dinner.

    healthwise, he seems better on this cooked diet. he only gets raw bones a couple of times a month, just to clean his teeth. he also 'shares' my lunch every day - eating the crusts from my sandwich and scoffing my apple core. the vet is happy with his health, his weight is under control and he loves his food. whether this would have suited our previous dogs, i don't know.

    (why do i cook the meat? because we've lived in rural areas with livestock and don't want the dogs having a taste for raw meat. whether it has helped or not, i couldn't say, but our dogs have never 'hunted' their own food and the neighbours have never had to shoot at our dogs, which to my mind at least, is a positive thing.)

    whether it will suit the new puppy....well, only time will tell, as i'll try him on it as he gets older. at present he's only 6 weeks old and i'm still a little cautious on what i feed him, though he hasn't turned his nose up at anything that has been offered. today i've cooked some chicken mince and rice and will be adding a small amount of that to one of tomorrows dry food meals (still on 4 feeds a day) tried a chicken neck yesterday...he gave about 3 chomps and then swallowed it. a couple of hours later he proceeded to throw it back up again, so i ended and began the years cleaning up puppy vomit from the carpet! ick!!!! all the while trying to keep frantic little puppy from eating it off the floor - not the easiest job in the world by torchlight and no glasses, with one hand fending off the puppy and holding the torch and the other wiping up the mess as best i could.....i think i even did it a couple of times while i was still asleep lol so the chicken necks can wait for another few days before i try them again, and i think i chop them into smaller portions, rather than feed him a whole neck.
    Last edited by tuesday; 01-01-2012 at 11:59 AM. Reason: i hate spelling mistakes in MY posts. lol
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  8. #48
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    I always give my dogs cooked veges...very occasionally raw.

    While cooking them does remove some of the nutritional value, I was always under the belief that dogs actually cant break down the cellular wall of a vagetable properly without it being cooked some which means they cant access the nutrition anyway....and I cant even remember where the hell I got that from

  9. #49
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    Lala, I haven't heard of that but a good point, Misty eats a lot of grass, she doesn't just eat it like any normal dog, she actually grazes like a sheep, I think she must have been watching the sheep when she was a pup as she came off the farm LOL. She does like the raw vegies though, I give her cooked vegies occasionally as well, along with anything that I cook up for us, in between she has her bits. Her coat is very shiny and she is a very healthy 3yo now, (geez, how time flies). The vet is happy with her health and seems to think the grass eating is something she does when excited, a behavioral thing. Cheers

  10. #50
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    Nov 2011
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    my pet loves to eat veggies, carrots to be particular. not too cooked.

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