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Thread: Agression or Normal Behaviour?

  1. #1
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    Default Agression or Normal Behaviour?

    Am just a little concerned after an incident that occurred over the weekend.

    After going out to dinner on Friday night with another couple, they came into the house afterward to meet Buckley for the first time. He is a 5 month staffy x. Anyway, they both came rushing in and proceeded to put there hands up to his face. He was backed into a corner and before i could say "just let him come to you" he had snapped and snarled at them. No biting but i was very shocked and so were they. In the 5 minutes they were there, he warmed to our female friend but would still let our male friend no where near him!

    I like to think we socialised him a lot when he was little. When we first got him he was very shy, and took a while to warm to my brother and dad. The second time he met one of my OH's male friends, he barked at carried on at him for a good 5 minutes before settling. But he is now great with all of the above people. He is always very wary of strangers (especially males), but just needs to time to be allowed to approach them.

    He is generally good with other dogs, just very dominant and excitable. Am just curious if this is normal type behaviour or something i need to get under control? I get a little worried taking him for walks because we pass so many people that always stop to try and pat him, and i can see he is very uncomfortable with this!
    Last edited by tiff-689; 06-20-2011 at 02:41 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Confidence Building

    What you are describing is completely normal.... for your dog. This means, you know he is shy. Now it's your job to set up scenarios where he does not feel he has to resort to behaviours like growling or snapping to let people know he is uncomfortable.

    -Have as many visitors as possible over but let them know that they need to ignore him until he has 'warmed up'
    -The more positive experiences you can give him with people and especially men the more likely he will start to feel comfortable with them.
    -Socialisation is over for him, now it becomes about confidence building.
    -When you take him out let people know that he is shy and ask them to approach in a manner you know he will be comfortable with or not at all.
    -If someone wants to pat him probably best that they sit on the floor, or crouch down, not make eye contact, and allow him to approach but keep their hands to themselves until he is comfortable.
    -You should become familiar with canine body language so you can pick up on the more subtle cues he would be trying to give.

    Canine Body Language | doglifetraining.com

    You have done the right thing to recognise this early. I would be taking this seriously, try to make a huge effort to set him up for success now so that in three or four years you will not have an even bigger problem on your hands.

    All the best. He sounds like a lovely puppy.

  3. #3
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    Default

    Anyway, they both came rushing in and proceeded to put there hands up to his face.
    I'd bite them. Never mind the warning...

    I think it's fair to say you know some completely dog ignorant people and it would be a good idea to go though the greeting process before you let them into the same space as your dog. And one of you manages the dog on lead, and the other one of you stops guests from rushing him - body block them if you have to. Far out.

    Make sure your dog always has room to retreat and do not let any guest chase him into a corner where his only option is fight. If your dog retreats - that's it, greet over for that guest.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks for the advice guys. I've never really owned a more reserved puppy like Buckley before. He loves and craves attention yes, he's just very unsure of new people at first. The couple he snapped at have a 1 yr old ****zu x and it kind of made me feel awful because they were saying "ohh our puppy loves everyone! she licks strangers to death."

    Feels like no matter how many times you say to someone "just ignore him until he wants your attention," the first thing they do is rush towards the dog.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I'd bite them. Never mind the warning...

    I think it's fair to say you know some completely dog ignorant people and it would be a good idea to go though the greeting process before you let them into the same space as your dog. And one of you manages the dog on lead, and the other one of you stops guests from rushing him - body block them if you have to. Far out.

    Make sure your dog always has room to retreat and do not let any guest chase him into a corner where his only option is fight. If your dog retreats - that's it, greet over for that guest.
    Yep I agree, I also know some very dog ignorant people. Thus I manage them more than my dogs. My MIL was one. My nephew was easier to train than her (love her to bits but no idea about dogs).

    I make sure I tell my visitors in no uncertain terms how to behave around my dogs so they get the desired interaction they want with them. Some friends love to roll around and wrestle and cuddle them as we do. Others don't even like to pat them, so I make sure they know what to do to get the desired encounter.

    As I tell them, my dogs want attention FULL STOP, they have to determine what they get through their own behaviour, if the dogs had it their way, they'd be in their face for every scrap of patting they could get.

    Your dog is clearly different to mine, but still requires the visitors to be managed.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I'd bite them. Never mind the warning...

    I think it's fair to say you know some completely dog ignorant people and it would be a good idea to go though the greeting process before you let them into the same space as your dog. And one of you manages the dog on lead, and the other one of you stops guests from rushing him - body block them if you have to. Far out.

    .
    Quote Originally Posted by Shelby-001 View Post
    Yep I agree, I also know some very dog ignorant people. Thus I manage them more than my dogs. My MIL was one. My nephew was easier to train than her (love her to bits but no idea about dogs).

    .
    The sentence "Dog ignorant person" Really erks me the way you are saying it to be honest.

    Calling a person dog ignorant because they walked in a patted a dog, You honest have got to be kidding?? Yes if they ran in and started throwing it about and smacking it in the fact but patting.. ignorant.. ??

    Anyway..

    My Bully loves Jumping on the trampoline with the kids, she goes crazy on there and the kids love it. We worked out the hard way that she doesnt like adults jumping on the tramp at the same time with the kids, she got a bit growly and had a little bit of an air snap

    I didnt find it aggressive so to speak, just like warning. To say they dont like the situation they are in. I think thats what your little mite was doing!
    Rubylisious


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog_Lover View Post
    Calling a person dog ignorant because they walked in a patted a dog, You honest have got to be kidding?? Yes if they ran in and started throwing it about and smacking it in the fact but patting.. ignorant.. ??
    They pushed the dog into a corner and made him feel threatened enough to growl and snap. I would definitely say that's "dog-ignorant". If someone did that to my dog I'd ask them to leave. A guest in your own home shouldn't come rushing in and stick their hands in your dog's face. I expect any guest in my home to be polite enough to ignore my dog until he wants pats or to ask first.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog_Lover View Post
    The sentence "Dog ignorant person" Really erks me the way you are saying it to be honest.

    Calling a person dog ignorant because they walked in a patted a dog, You honest have got to be kidding?? Yes if they ran in and started throwing it about and smacking it in the fact but patting.. ignorant.. ??
    No not kidding, sorry but that is dog ignorant behaviour. If you have never met the dog before, you have no idea how it will react to any situation, therefore assuming you can walk up and pat it straight away, no introduction no nothing is completely ignorant.

    Throwing it about and smacking it would be abuse not ignorant!

    The ignorant component, is assuming ALL dogs can be patted without appropriate introductions. My dogs would handle it, clearly this one doesn't, so yes to 'walk in and pat it' is ignorant.
    Cheers Aleesha
    Lilly, OH & Boof ..... the 3 things that make life tick!

    All posts made under the name of "Shelby-001" are copywritten and may not be used in any publication or media without my prior written consent!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by silvershadowwolf24 View Post
    They pushed the dog into a corner and made him feel threatened enough to growl and snap. I would definitely say that's "dog-ignorant". If someone did that to my dog I'd ask them to leave. A guest in your own home shouldn't come rushing in and stick their hands in your dog's face. I expect any guest in my home to be polite enough to ignore my dog until he wants pats or to ask first.
    Really? (bold part)

    Wow!

    I don't expect all my friends, or people who may enter my home, to be experts on how to approach a dog. I don't even expect them to have any knowledge at all.

    Not everyone is dog savvy. Not every dog owner is savvy either.

    Sorry, but I find that attitude shcoking and rather scary. The onus of responsibility is in all reality on the dog owner, when in their own home. It is not up to the visitor to have an indepth or any prior knowledge of the right and wrong way to approach a dog. Instead it is up to the owner to ensure the dog is not placed in a situation where an visitor may be able to do this. The last time I looked, 'how to approach a dog' wasn't included in school curricula and it isn't a subject taught to the general population. To expect people to know about it, and then to eject someone from your home becuase they didn't know is a bit over the top.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shelby-001 View Post
    No not kidding, sorry but that is dog ignorant behaviour. If you have never met the dog before, you have no idea how it will react to any situation, therefore assuming you can walk up and pat it straight away, no introduction no nothing is completely ignorant.

    Throwing it about and smacking it would be abuse not ignorant!

    The ignorant component, is assuming ALL dogs can be patted without appropriate introductions. My dogs would handle it, clearly this one doesn't, so yes to 'walk in and pat it' is ignorant.
    People are taught not to pat 'strange' dogs in case they react in an aggressiv emanner. One would assume, that in a friend's home, you would be reasonably safe patting a dog.

    Seriously, the comments here are just so over the top, they're scary!
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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