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Thread: Agression or Normal Behaviour?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lala View Post
    However, it is our job as humans to help teach a dog to get along in a human world and where we can't do that, to protect the dog from situations it may not react well to (something that was not done in this case IMO)
    This is exactly what I said in another post. It is up to us, most of it is up to us.
    Respect and you shall be respected. Animal is always right.

  2. #42
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    Im sure you did, I wasnt disagreeing....was just reaffirming my stance LOL

  3. #43
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    I protect my dogs....I have rescue dogs and sometimes they have unknown history and I know my two most recent ones have had people and dog aggression and timidity.

    It has been my responsibility to protect these two dogs in their early time with us from biting someone. I have always been with them away from home or when we have visitors and i have always educated people on how to deal with them...Leave them alone........

    The second part of this has been to re-educate/train my dogs. make them happier to be around strangers and teach them to deal with new environments/people.

    Both these dogs now deal well with people, who approach calmly.........And with the help of our kennel Club our dogs even now seem to enjoy meeting new people. But people rushing at dogs excitedly is a big call for my Annabelle. And it would be up to me to protect her.

    I travel a lot with my newfies and Annabelle usually wears a red neckerchief when I walk them together in our local towns and village, where they are now well known. This is for when people ask to pet my newfies, which is very common. I can say yes, but wait for the one in red to approach you. It works well and is easy for everyone. And when the others are petted, she feels confident enough to approach too. Now often she does the approach. And she has always adored kids.......
    We as the owner/handlers are responsible to protect our dogs and the general public
    Pets are forever

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    Oh, you should learn more about dogs sweetie. And yes, they DO have a right to behave like a dog just as much as you DO have rights to behave like a human. Dogs don't speak human, some are undersocialised, some are just shy by nature, some are traumatised, some get scared, some are bold and courageous and assertive. Dogs react like dogs and aggression is part of who they are. It's up to US to help them never or as little as possible to exhibit aggression - not by restricting, not by punishment, not by coercion, but by teaching them and trying to understand their behavior and what is causing certain behaviours. If you are not willing to do that - it's really really sad and you shouldn't call yourself "dog-lover" because love is so much more than having a dog in your house that you can pat and walk as you please.
    Please do not patronise me Fedra .. And NO they dont have the right!!! Not in my house!! Yes it can happen as after all they are animals but it isnt OK and I would most deffinately correct that behavior and if it cannot be corrected then I wouldnt have said animal around my family!

    You must fall into the category of people who pass the blame to everyone but the dog when someone is bitten or even Killed!

    That comment has honestly Sh1t me to know end to imply that I am not a "Dog Lover" because I dont approve of dogs becoming aggressive in everyday situations.
    Rubylisious


  5. #45
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    Well, this has all caused quite a stir..

    I think we can all agree on the fact that we can't expect people entering our houses to know what we want them to do unless we tell them beforehand. My reason for not giving a pre-warning was simply for the fact that i didn't expect Buckley to react in that way at all, and i didn't expect two people who own a dog themselves, to be so forceful with him.

    I honestly believe the only reason he snapped was simply because he was trapped in a corner and they were both towering over the top of him. Even in this instance..he was happy enough to be in the same room as them a few minutes later. I'll definitely be keeping an eye on this behaviour in future.

  6. #46
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    bulldog lover

    are you saying that if someone (eg a tradie) attacked your dog (or you), you'd prefer your dog let itself be killed without defending itself?

    Tiff's dog thought it was being attacked, it had already tried running away as far as it could get.

  7. #47
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    As I said, dont aggree with dogs becomming aggressive in everyday situations.

    One day I was pretending to throw my four year old down the steps, he was screaming, in a playful way, as i was tickling him and saying Im gonna throw ya.. Anyway, we were mucking around.

    Ruby was about 6-7 months old. She came barrelling up the stairs, and knocked me a bit, her hair on her back was standing up and she gave a bit of a growl with her shoulders really stiff. When I put my boy down she was happy as Larry. Started licking him and followed him down the stairs.

    I knew that was a sign of aggression toward me, although is was protective I punished her for it.

    Yes you, and some other might find it excusable, a judge isnt when she takes a chunk out of my arm because "SHE" felt threatened.
    Rubylisious


  8. #48
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    Hi Bulldoglover

    The trouble with punishing a dog is there is often fallout ie unexpected and unintended consequences. You don't know what you are training your dog to do (as opposed to not-do).

    In this case, you punished your dog for this:

    "happy as Larry. Started licking him and followed him down the stairs."

    Not for growling at you. She got what she wanted from that - ie you stopped doing the behaviour that upset her. So she was rewarded for that.

    That's assuming you didn't punish her as soon as she growled at you - before you put your son down, but even then she may just assume you'd gone mental and from attacking your son, you'd progressed to attacking her.

    Most Dog and Cat law allows the dog self defence from provocation and allow the dog to protect property.

    The GR involved in that attack in Sydney where there were four people in the house is on reprieve because on investigation it seems she was defending someone she perceived as being attacked.

    Your dog is not going to be in trouble for taking a chunk out of a kidnappers arm or for defending your child against you if you do go mental.

  9. #49
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    Yes Hye thats true, there can be a fallout I agree with that. It can also go with not punishing the behavior at all.

    I yelled at Ruby as soon as she done it, I guess cause she scared the Sh1t out of me to be honest.

    The way I see it is you can point out "Oh what if you were attacked" What if your child was attacked" "What if your house was boken into"

    When you way up how often I wrestle with my kids, how often we play footy in the house and how often there is mulitple kids running in and out of my house screaming/crying. Compared to how often the other scenarios may happen..

    I would rather be labbelled as "Not a dog Lover" and be seen as someone that "Needs to know more about dogs" and have a dog that knows it is NOT ok to act aggressive!!

    Done and done
    Rubylisious


  10. #50
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    Your dog is not going to be in trouble for taking a chunk out of a kidnappers arm or for defending your child against you if you do go mental.
    I think you'll find that under the Dangerous Dog Act and the NSW Companion Animals Act, the dog would be in trouble regardless of the reason for the aggression. I could be wrong though, and I am happy to find out the definitive on this though if anyone is interested.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

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