Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27

Thread: Littermates...please Help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4

    Default Littermates...please Help

    Hi all
    Well, it seems we may have made a rather ignorant error We had no idea that purchasing two girls (Staffordshire Bull Terriers, purebred) from the same litter could be problematic Getting a dog is not something we did on a whim, we considered it for over a year. Purchasing Rascal was, I admit, a spur of the moment decision. We had planned on only one (Millie), but when we found out they were having difficulty placing Rascal, we decided to take her.

    Please tell me this can work out.....

    Their behaviours are as follows:

    Their behaviours are as follows:
    nasty nasty fighting with eachother, growling, biting, barking

    Growling at the children

    Inhibited biting of hubby and I

    Millie whines when Rascal not with her

    Very competitive for attention from us - if Millie approaches us, Rascal jumps in and growls/bites Millie and vice versa

    If we start to play with one, the other tries to take over
    Millie seems more "anxious"

    Our plan (so far):
    Separate crates
    Feed, play and sleep separately
    Train separately
    Spend time with them individually

    Haven't bought into the whole Cesar Millan stuff, but I do think he has some good ideas. Correcting Millie when she showed too much anxiety around another dog (a Chihuaha growled and barked at her yesterday) worked a treat, she calmed right down and just sat there!

    Should we attempt to exchange one of our girls for a boy? (unthinkable, but we want to do what's best for them). Another friend has two boys from this litter, one of whom is deaf. Oh, this same couple who own the Bitch, have kept one female puppy, only to now discover that keeping a female pup with her mum is not a good idea either. Had I realised how little they knew, I would have not taken their word at face value.

    All advice welcome!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    My advice for what it's worth is to give one back and stick to one pup. I feel this will be far less stressful for all concerned and the pups will get over any separation grief. Dogs DO adapt well to changes and we must not make the mistake of putting our human emotions on them.

    I have had an old dog whose devoted owner died and there was no problem. I also had an elderly GSD that my sister in law no longer wanted due to a move with only a small court yard for the dog. Tara was also happy here from the start. Puppies will adapt even faster.

    Good luck whatever you decide to do.
    We DO make mistakes and if we learn from it it is good.

    I got a young lab puppy when my son was young, close to 30 years ago now.
    That was a disaster. I was ignorant and had no idea of the dog's needs. I had to rehome her. My sister took her and they all had a wonderful life.
    Last edited by Di_dee1; 06-13-2011 at 05:15 PM.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    By "correcting her" when she shows anxiety around another dog, what do you mean?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    2,388

    Default

    I agree with Di_dee.

    Rehome one of the girls and stick with just one.

    You should never adopt/take home a pup because people are "having trouble rehoming"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    361

    Default

    Echoing everyone else: rehome one of the girls. Female Staffords can and will fight to the death, and this is common behaviour in littermates. And if they are fighting at only 8/9 weeks old, you have a problem that could be beyond your skill. If you want a companion for the remaining girl, wait until she is 6-9 months old and get a male pup. Far less competition, and a dog/bitch combination is far less likely to have problems. Good on you for recognizing the problem early.


    like a rolling thunder chasing the wind...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Correcting Millie when she showed too much anxiety
    Correcting / punishing a dog that is already anxious or fearful actually makes things worse. In your situation you could be training your dog to attack with no warning by punishing it for giving you warnings when it is anxious.

    It would be better for you to get far away from the other dog that your dog calms down, and *reward* that calm behaviour, and reward focus on you. Roast chicken in little pieces handed over at a high rate with lots of praise works.

    I don't think what Cesar Milan does should be tried at home. Personally I don't like most of his methods. Lessons based on fear and force do not stick the way that lessons based on reward and praise do. It's much better to show a dog what you do want than what you don't want. What does a dog do when nothing is right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thank you Hyacinth, that makes so much sense and reminds us how much we still have to learn.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    central coast nsw
    Posts
    802

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    I don't think what Cesar Milan does should be tried at home. Personally I don't like most of his methods. Lessons based on fear and force do not stick the way that lessons based on reward and praise do. It's much better to show a dog what you do want than what you don't want. What does a dog do when nothing is right?
    I am not sure i have seen him use "fear and force" ever in an episode. He just uses an energy and personality that a dog considers higher in the "pack".
    I have not seen a dog scared of him, only dogs that are submissive to him, not fearful.

    I personally think what he does is unbelievable, however i think its in his "energy" as a person, i am not sure his training methods work with different people as we all have different personalities and some do not have the necessary energy to make a dog submissive... However certain training methods without this energy still allow us to portray to a dog that we must be obeyed and respected.

    The only problem with caesar is the "Instead of being pack leader, you are trying to love and be pack leader", this is something i dont agree with. You can still show your dog love and affection, which personally i believe THAT is the reason you get a dog is for the companionship and unconditional love, and have it respect that you are the leader. I think he is on a bit of a power trip there...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    MAKING a dog submissive even if it's not is certainly using force. You shouldn't need to have a submissive dog to be able to control it.

  10. #10

    Default

    The whole 'pack' thing along with 'dominance' 'alpha theory' etc has been widely debunked.

    A dog does NOT have to be submissive for training to be successful!!! And his methods are horrid. Not to mention he cheats and lies during the shows and people are too busy being distracted by his theatrics that they don't see what is actually happening in the show.

    He is an outright bully. There is no 'energy' going on. His body language is quite aggressive. The tones of voice he uses are negative and pushy, and you wind up with a dog that has been cowed into behaving, rather than a happy dog willing and able to do anything for their owner.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •