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Thread: Two Staffy Pups Going Crazy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    19

    Default Two Staffy Pups Going Crazy

    We've just bought two female Staffy pups from a friend of ours out of their bitch's first litter. Both are currently eight weeks old and we have had them about ten days now.

    We live in a three bedroom townhouse with a modest backyard (although in the market for something bigger). We also have two adult cats.

    Our two pups seem to have boundless energy when they are not sleeping. Walks to the park/oval knock them out for a while and then it is all a hundred miles an hour again (zooming around just after midnight as I type). We currently sleep them together in the bathroom with the heater on (cold in Canberra atm) and the door shut, and also put them in there if we are all going to be out of the house.

    They have a few toys to play with but are still into everything else and we are having to barricade rooms and it feels like we need to suspend everything from the ceiling.

    Also, their aggressive play, which we understand is in part just puppyhood, has had both our children (7 & 5) in tears with nips and scratches.

    We plan to have them in puppy preschool but there are no openings in classes near us for about another three weeks.

    Suggestions on how to stimulate/educate/exercise/exhaust this pair would be gratefully received.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    228

    Default

    Wow two pups at once, well done
    I have a 5 month old and to be honest the best toys that keep her occupied are kongs!
    I have a treat kong which I fill before leaving the house, I 'stuff it' kong which I freeze with goodies such as organic yoghurt and some dog mince, a ball kong which is also full of treats and a throw kong (no treats but she spends ages throwing it to herself).

    They're great toys as they can keep them entertained for hours. They're also stimulating as the dogs have to work out how to recieve the treats!
    Good luck with them, love to see some pics.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,210

    Default

    Just a note, unfortunately until they get at least their second shots trips to the park are a bit of a No No. You wouldnt want to pick up something that your Pups are not protected against.

    We didnt leave the house until Ruby was three months and because there was a bit of Parvo going around all shoes had to be taken off before coming in and if you were wearing thongs you had to wash you feet

    In regards to your question, I started teaching Ruby the basic commands, for some reason learning made her sleepy hehe I also have a two story house like you so I would get her to chase me up and down the steps. I have two little kids too so they played with her pretty much all day! haha

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thanks for the replies. We've just been out and bought a heap more toys so hopefully that will help them settle down. I've been looking at the Kongs (can anyone say "expensive"?) so will investigate them some more.

    The pups are learning "Sit" pretty well, and are getting the hang of "No" fairly quickly. Second shots are in the next day or two and then we will be attacking the oval with a vengeance.

  5. #5

    Default

    i got 2 rottie pups a couple of months apart so i feel what your going through
    although expensive kongs were one of the best toys i got (still got them and still play with them quite alot 18months later)
    maybe for staffys you should get the black ones they are tougher
    they are probably chewing alot as you prob got them while they were still learnign the correct play from their mum and now its just each other showing what to do. be firm with them and they should get over the biting (at puppy school they told us when their young insted of smack just grab their head as if you were their mum when ever they do something like that)

    i suggest you just remove everything that may be tempting inc power cords, clothes, kids toys, ours even got to the skirting boards, outdoor furniture.

    just be patient ours have slowed down a bit - try raw bones they are a good distraction.

    good luck -

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    19

    Default

    The new toys in the last hour have gone down a treat. Ropes and rawhide from Reject Shop/Kmart. Looks like a kong is going on the shopping list sooner rather than later though. Trying to add a profile pic of our two darlings.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,634

    Default

    To be honest, getting two litter mates together has never been recommended. It just makes it harder to get the dogs to focus on you.

    You may have to start giving them each individual time for training. I would recommend that you crate train them also so you can have some respite and the ability to separate them occasionally. I have had young dogs together from rescue and it is not something I plan on doing again anytime soon. I like to concentrate on one at a time, adding the next when the first is under control and more sensible. All mine are crate trained and I do quite a bit of work separately with each dog.

    Realistically they probably would have also benefitted from being left with their mum and siblings till they were 8 weeks old as this is a period when they get discipline from mum and other litter mates.

    However the situation is what it is and as you have young children you really need to get control of the situation the best you can.

    Puppy school is a good start and then consider looking around for a local dog club that runs obedience classes, they can often help you with good information and guidance. Get your kids involved at some level so the dogs know that they cant push them around and jump all over them.

    When you can take them to the oval, (mindful of their vaccination status) make sure you can keep control of them while you teach a recall and dont let them madly jump on other dogs and kids or run out under a car. Start now with some simple recall work at home using treats or toys.aking it fun and keep sessions short. Perhaps you could on occassion take then separately so you can concentrate on getting them to listen to you. Mental work outs will help tire them out. Be careful of how much you let them run when they are baby puppies as too much exercise can be tough on growing joints and bones.

    Get them to sit before they get their dinner is also a good way to start getting control.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 06-08-2011 at 11:26 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Yes we were hoping to stretch it to eight weeks with the mother but the owners were determined that they had to go at six weeks as they had "plans" to go away. As you say, it is what it is.

    I'd been wondering about giving them individual attention so we'll give that a try too.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Rural NSW
    Posts
    5,967

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    I had 2 pups, male and female from the same litter (my FIL's working dog whom I dognapped) at the same time when they were 6 weeks old I was diagnosed with cancer, then went through chemo and radiation whilst trying to toilet train them and molding into the inside/outside pets I wanted. (I am in remission)

    I am only telling you this so you can say OMG, at least your situation is better than that, lol.

    I had no real trouble with them, mind you I don't think I would have done it with young children in the house either.

    It is doable though as long as you are motivated and consistent with catering for both your children's and puppy's needs.

    The nipping etc is normal puppy behaviour that the mother disciplines by holding their muzzle and growling. Some people do this and growl, I preferred to do this with a NO. Their mother STILL does this to them even though both are now bigger than she is and they are 18 months old.
    If it continued then they had my back turned on them or they were removed.
    They were rewarded by treats or praise for good behaviour.

    For toilet training we had a word..widdle widdle. I said it as I opened the door, as they were sniffing around then when they did it you would have thought they had won an oscar...big praise, treat etc.
    The male took longer than the female to get the idea.
    In the end when I took them out and said widdle widdle they sank down to pee like they were doing syncronised swimming. So funny.

    I even peed on the grass myself at times (No neighbours) to give them the idea.

    I had no problems with chewing as they had alternatives to house stuff and were fully supervised when inside, which was most of the time during the day. Baby gates can be a godsend too.

    I dislike puppyhood, always have, preferring older dogs so If I can do it, you certainly can.

    Good luck.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

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    Rascal Dog

    I don't know what kind of friend this is but they don't qualify as a "responsible breeder" by the RSPCA standard. Sheesh. Puppies should not be moved on before 8 weeks, and ideally a little bit older, and the breeder should be helping you with advice at least with your puppy problems.
    How old should a puppy be before they are adopted/purchased? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase
    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    Like someone else said - two puppies from the same litter are usually big trouble. Ie they've been in competition with each other from day 1. So they will remain in competition and it may even escalate to nasty fighting.

    Ian Dunbar has a lot of useful advice here.
    Digital Dog Training Textbook | Dog Star Daily

    You may also want to invest in a couple of crates and crate train these puppies so you and your children can have time separate from them.

    Squirrel dudes are much cheaper than kongs and do a better job of keeping the kibble in ie the dog has to work to get the kibble out instead of it just all falling out when they grab the end. I've also found they're great with a dentastix in them. Ie my dog takes a long time to get one of those out, keeps her amused for ages.

    You may also want to get some big rope toys for your puppies so they have something they can bite other than your children. Your children should have a very strict rule of "game over" if anyone gets chomped - stop playing. If puppy is not getting the message it should be spending some time in a crate, not as punishment but just to give the children a break.

    And vague rule of thumb for puppy exercise (to prevent damage to bones and joints as they grow), five minutes per month of age. So at 8 weeks they don't need more than ten minutes at a time or you risk them having bad joints when they're older.

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