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Thread: Why Buy A Pedigree Pure Breed Dog?

  1. #1
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    Default Why Buy A Pedigree Pure Breed Dog?

    Why buy a Pedigree Pure Breed Dog?
    In a nutshell, because they make great pets!

    First, exactly what is a pedigree pure breed dog and a designer dog?

    A Pedigree Pure Bred Dog has parentage that is known AND:
    •Both parents are of the same breed.
    •The breed is recognised by the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) or one of its Affiliates.
    •The dog's breeders are registered to breed puppies.
    •The parents of any puppies are registered with the ANKC or one of its affiliates to be bred from and
    •It has a pedigree showing at least 3 generations of parentage


    A Designer Dog is many things including:
    •A puppy resulting from the deliberate mating of two unrelated breed types.
    •A puppy resulting from an accidental mating of two different breed types (note these dogs used to be called mongrels or cross breeds)
    •A puppy resulting from the mating of two cross bred (or designer bred) dogs.
    •A puppy resulting from the mating of one pedigree or pure bred parent and one cross bred or designer bred dog.
    •A designer dog has not been bred by a registered breeder
    •A designer dog is not pure bred or pedigree.


    Pedigree Pure Bred VS Designer Dog
    The Cost Factor

    Many people believe that pedigree dogs will be out of their price range. You may be pleasantly surprised. Some pedigree breeds cost more than designer or cross bred dogs, some cost considerably less. The amount of money and work that goes into properly raising a litter of puppies does not vary. Most of the expenses that pedigree owners face, breeders of designer breeds don't. These include:

    •Stud Fees
    •Importing new blood lines (spending $8,000 - $10,000 to import a dog from the UK would be an average, some dogs cost a lot more).
    •Importing frozen semen (average cost of $5,000 from USA).
    •Raising promising stock for showing and future breeding (note: some of these dogs will not measure up and will be placed into homes, it has cost time and money to get to that decision).
    •Air freight to access stud dogs. To send a 13kg dog interstate and back can cost approx $400 each way.
    •Vet checks and assessments for inheritable diseases such as hip dysplasia, eye disorders, blood disease, heart defects etc. These tests are sometimes performed on parents before breeding or on the puppies.



    Hybrid Vigour

    A lot of the hype with Designer dogs is due to the mistaken belief that they are healthier than the pedigree pure bred dog due to so-called 'Hybrid Vigour'.

    Hybrid vigour can only occur when both parents are clear from genetic problems. Their breed does not matter. It is the genetic make up of the parents that counts! The only way to be sure is to ask the breeder if they have tested for known problems.

    It is easy for you to research these problems on the internet these days, not all information is accurate with some one-off cases often being attributed to an entire breed but it gives you a guide.

    When looking at Designer Dogs (cross breeds), you need to consider two breeds, not one. First look at the problems that are common to those two breeds. For example, does hip dysplasia show up for both breeds? If it does, then that lovely designer breed could be a real problem. Check if the parents were tested and ask what the results were. Second, look at the unique problems for each breed and then do more research. Some genetic problems only need one parent to have the disorder, just the same as in humans. Once again ask if any testing has been done. Ask about guarantees too.

    Today Tonight (an Australian television current affairs show) ran a story in 2003 regarding the misconception that the public has about the health of designer dogs. After the story aired, the station was inundated with other owners of designer dogs who also advised of similar health problems with their dogs so they ran a follow-up story the next night. See reprint of original story.

    As a dog is a living creature, there is no guarantee, with either a pure bred or a designer dog, that the dog will be disease free for it's entire life. Buying a pedigree pure bred dog from a registered breeder who tests for hereditary diseases, is however your best chance of getting a healthy dog. Breeders of designer dogs will generally just take 2 dogs and breed them without any thought of testing first.



    The Known VS the Unknown
    The pedigree dog is infinitely more predictable as to size, characteristics, temperament and coat than its crossbred relatives.

    The designer dog (or crossbred dog) is a gamble as to how it will turn out. As many of the designer dogs are first crosses, no-one can really say what its coat will be like, how big it will grow etc. Just ask many professional groomers of the coat problems with designer dogs.

    Breeders of Designer Dogs may tell you by crossing 'x' and 'y' breed that they are taking the best from both breeds. They however have no control over which attributes from the parents will be used. The puppy could quite possibly get the worst attributes of both parents.

    Wally Conron (the man who first bred the Labradoodle for the Royal Guide Dogs Association in Victoria, Australia) once said

    "I have opened a Pandora's Box. I'd be the first to come out and admit that. It's a pity, really...we had gone to great lengths to ensure the poodles we used did not have any problems," notes Conron, who feels the same cannot be said of many of today's breeders.

    "I think it is a recipe for disaster because they are breeding with dogs that have hereditary problems".
    "Another concern is that people are being mislead into believing that labradoodles as well as other poodle crosses all have allergy friendly coats and do not shed. This is not the case and their coats and saliva have to be specially tested," Conron says. "At the Royal Guide Dogs,for instance, we had one litter where there were ten puppies and out of those only two were non allergenic.".



    Final word

    Adding a dog to the family is a big step (a 10 to 15 year commitment) and the final choice of a pedigree dog or a designer dog is up to you.

    Most people undertake a lot of research into the type of dog they want with consideration being given to looks, size, coat, temperament, health, longevity etc. The safest way of getting what you want or need is to consider a Pedigree Pure Bred dog. There is over 180 pedigree breeds recognized by the Australian National Kennel Association so there is one to suit everybody's situation.

    If you still want a cross breed after reading this (and we have no problem with that), then please do the right thing and visit your nearest dog shelter and help save one of the thousands of homeless dogs that are put down each year. They will give you the same amount of love and enjoyment and cost a fraction of the money that you would pay for a designer dog from a pet shop.

    Buying from a pet shop could also inadventently support puppy farms and possible serious neglect of dogs. See Leo's Story for an account of what can happen.

    http://www.dogzonline.com.au/
    Last edited by aussiemyf7; 10-20-2010 at 09:19 AM.
    Education not Legislation

  2. #2
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    Good information.

    Also there are the working bred dogs that are not ANKC registered but they have their own registers. Many are registered on their pedigrees, others are on these registers because of their outstanding working abilities. Great option for people involved in dog sports.

    I would also like to add that just because a breeder is ANKC registered does not mean you will get a quality dog. You still need to do your homework and make sure the breeder ticks all the boxes, same with the working dog breeders.

  3. #3

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    Good post.

    I would like to add that not all registered breeders are reputable. And only diseases which are listed as being hereditary for the breed are tested. There are some health issues which are yet to be proven to be hereditary so the breeders can (and do) keep producing stock from them.

    Having said that, you have more chance of getting a healthy pedigree than a designer dog.

  4. #4

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    Very useful indeed!

    Thanks!

  5. #5

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    thanks for sharing this useful information.

  6. #6

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    A purebred dog is far more predictable as to its behavior, appearance, and size. These are the result of many years of selective breeding. These all are for a specific purpose.

  7. #7
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    IM voting for bitza's.

    Take a look at any breed that has been around for 100 yrs +, so outside of Australian Kennel Club basically and outside of Australia.
    Compare the Pinnacle of Perfection from 100 yrs ago, to what pinnacle of perfection won the countries top dog shows today. I have a GSD. Just look what the so called "expert" breeders have done to this fine animal. I think they should be bloody shot!

    What you will see is a vast difference in appearance in dogs over that 100 yrs. How come, if it was perfect 100 yrs ago, does it now look so different?

    And a very loud shout out for working dog lines. Not necessarily similar to look at as, the 'show ponies', but if i'm paying a LOT of money, i want a dog that works. Other than that, its like you'd be buying a showy 4WD drive Korean ute, that cant tow anything as the engine is not big enough.
    Ripped off in other words.

    Just my opinion. Formed after competing in UK in dog shows, with a working border collie, that could not be entered as it was not considered a pedigree at that time. Whereas the bull dog, that cant breath, cant give birth to its young without an operation, that needs eye operations to prevent repeated eye infections, or dogs with hip scores worthy of a geriatric. Disgusting in my view. That is a vastly different view than it was say 20yrs ago, when i was showing and believed all the garbage you're told about buying pedigrees.

    Sorry, bit of a rant. Very passionately Anti pedigree breeding right now, having a GSD has caused that.

  8. #8

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    Very informative post but a couple of statements are incorrect.

    For example - Hybrid vigour can only occur when both parents are free of genetic diseases - this is wrong. Hybrid vigour occurs when the parents carry separate issues and so the resulting offspring only inherit one gene of a recessive trait and so the trait is not expressed. This is why it can occur to an extent with mutts. Some issues are not breed specific - ie hip dysplasia and so having parents of different breeds is unlikely to prevent the inheritance of problem genes from both parents. On the other hand, Dobermans unfortunately suffer from a number of breed specific heart problems and other structural deformities. My Doberman cross RR is 'clear by parentage' for those.

    The problem in my eyes with registered purebred dogs is that today at least (and for many generations now) the main factor behind their breeding has been adherence to the interpretation of the breed standard - in order to win prizes at shows. It wasn't health, it wasn't intelligence, it wasn't working ability and it wasn't their suitability as pets. In my case, my other dog is also a Doberman cross, but he was deliberately bred. His lines have been recorded, the dogs used in the breeding program chosen deliberately but for different factors. They needed working dogs, intelligent, healthy, low maintenance and high drive to work. He doesn't look like a perfect Doberman (not because he has other breeds in him - looks can be achieved in a few generations as we've seen with the introduction of the corgi into rottweilers or GSP into dalmations) but because looks were not what they were breeding for. You will get what you breed for and as we have seen with the silver foxes, by changing the breeding criteria, you can achieve a very different population very quickly (ie you can see how quickly things can go 'wrong' when the breeders of working dogs stop breeding their dogs based on working ability, or health, or intelligence).

  9. #9
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    I think you guys have missed the point... this is about pedigree v designer dogs (bred by puppy farmers and those out to make a quick buck). Not trashing any old bitsa dog.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by 99bottles View Post
    The problem in my eyes with registered purebred dogs is that today at least (and for many generations now) the main factor behind their breeding has been adherence to the interpretation of the breed standard - in order to win prizes at shows. It wasn't health, it wasn't intelligence, it wasn't working ability and it wasn't their suitability as pets. In my case, my other dog is also a Doberman cross, but he was deliberately bred. His lines have been recorded, the dogs used in the breeding program chosen deliberately but for different factors. They needed working dogs, intelligent, healthy, low maintenance and high drive to work. He doesn't look like a perfect Doberman (not because he has other breeds in him - looks can be achieved in a few generations as we've seen with the introduction of the corgi into rottweilers or GSP into dalmations) but because looks were not what they were breeding for. You will get what you breed for and as we have seen with the silver foxes, by changing the breeding criteria, you can achieve a very different population very quickly (ie you can see how quickly things can go 'wrong' when the breeders of working dogs stop breeding their dogs based on working ability, or health, or intelligence).
    There are many registered purebred breeders that breed for working ability and have dogs that go into working homes. I honestly find it bizarre that you think registered breeders don't breed for temperament at all, when temperament is an integral part of the breed standard. Sure there are some breeders out there who place conformation above temperament - but the majority IMO consider health and temperament integral elements of their breeding program.

    You'd be pretty naive to think that how a dog is put together doesn't play a part in their working ability. "Even" working line breeders select dogs that have sound structure.

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