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Thread: Feeding a Staffy..

  1. #1
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    Default Feeding a Staffy..

    Hey guys have a quick question. I have a staffy pup. One problem I am having is she is a real pig and always seems hungry. Now one thing I think may be a contrubuting factor is that she came froma litter of 13 I think it was, and honestly I dont think they were fed well, the "food" they received was adult biscuits soaked in water, and I think perhaps they may have had to "fight" for there food!! I was not happy when I found out. We have had to deal with food aggression, bones are a big nono, other food she is good with. The thing is that she litterally gulps food, its like she is starving!! In the morining she gets her kibble, and she would be getting her daily amount in this feed, plus fed at night foodscraps, dog roll or biscits ect. Her weight is looking great, although this morning I am thinking she is looking a little porky around the waist. We have been informed by the vet that she may be a "larger" staffy as at her last needles a few months back she was nearly 8 kgs!! We worm her quite religiously so I cant see that being teh issue, we do have another diog, but she is a slow eater and is no threat to her food, they even get fed in different spots and Pheonix always finishes first. Any helpful ideas??
    OMG that was a novel!! Hope it makes sence...

  2. #2
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    Thought I moght add that she is 4 months old

  3. #3

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    You can get special dog bowls to slow down speedy eaters - I think they're called gobble bowls. They have lumps and bumps moulded into them that the dog has to eat around.

    You can get a similar result by putting a half brick in her food bowl, so she has to slow down and pick the bits out from around it. Although I can imagine that some would just tip the whole lot over and guts off the ground!!

    I have had foster kittens and pups that behaved similarly - and were from a less than perfect start where I gather food was a bit scarce. After a few weeks of solid feeding routine they did start to settle down. Sometimes it takes time for them to relax and realise that the food isn't running out and they don't need to panic.

  4. #4
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    My puppies are pigs (4 months old).

    They got plenty of food, are not aggressive to each other even regarding bones etc, but they'd beat the adults in an eating competition hands down.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for your replies!! Sounds like it could be just an age thing then?? Hopefully she will settle down, perhaps even the cold might not be helping..

  6. #6
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    I would say the whole fighting over food could be an issue, but my in-laws have a staffy who is a big pig as well, and she isn't food aggressive around people or other dogs.

    Cats are different I know, but, I got my youngest cat last year from the RSPCA and she was very food aggressive (and very scrawny) with all food other than dry food. To the point of growling, and putting herself between you and the food, running away with it and not letting go. This was to people and my other cat. She has grown out of it now and really only eats dry food.

    Perhaps until your pup learns that she now has enough food she will settle down?

  7. #7
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    Thanks Krystal, thankfully we have dealt with the food aggresion back when she was at puppy oreschool and she is good now, we havnt given her bones in a while so not sure about those, and afetr I was put on antibiotics and had a swollen fingure I aint gunna try LOL. Just another thought do pups get growth spurts?? I cant rmember our aussie that bad...mmm

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nattylou View Post
    You can get special dog bowls to slow down speedy eaters - I think they're called gobble bowls. They have lumps and bumps moulded into them that the dog has to eat around.

    You can get a similar result by putting a half brick in her food bowl, so she has to slow down and pick the bits out from around it. Although I can imagine that some would just tip the whole lot over and guts off the ground!!

    I have had foster kittens and pups that behaved similarly - and were from a less than perfect start where I gather food was a bit scarce. After a few weeks of solid feeding routine they did start to settle down. Sometimes it takes time for them to relax and realise that the food isn't running out and they don't need to panic.
    I use a slow feed bowl for my SBT
    SPR fosters:Rowland, Matrix, Mia, Arizona, Romeo, Wrinkles, George, Molly, Su Lin, Ellie, Charlie, Charlotte, Lulu, Montana http://www.sharpeirescue.com.au

  9. #9
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    Sometimes with puppies it's one in all in.

    So when the other dog has it's head in the bowl or has a bone then it wants that one. It is the litter pack mentality.

    When I give bones to my older dogs they are put on chains and then staked out in the front yard separated from each other so each can eat at their own pace. The puppies are put in a large C-Crate and after a bit of swapping of bones normally settle down to one bone each. They'd be happy to share a bone. But as I said they eat very fast and one bone would be gone in no time.

    I don't have any issues over regular meals of biscuits and mince. Their bowls are placed about 4ft apart.

    I've seen puppies with a good start in life be like this and visa-versa.

    It may settle with age or you may have to start some training, feeding puppy in a crate and particularly making sure that no bones are left over or burried so that they can't fight over it when you are not around.

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