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Thread: New Puppy Nipping a Lot - Advice?

  1. #1

    Default New Puppy Nipping a Lot - Advice?

    Hi Everyone,

    Yay we bought a puppy! He is just adorable and his name is Jax. We've had him for just under a month now and haven't been having many issues.

    Over the last couple of days though he has been nipping my fingers etc. a lot more than usual. He was doing it a bit when we first got him but only when he was very excited and normally a firm 'No!' would make him stop.

    Lately, however, he starts to mouth whenever we play with him. He is just under 12 weeks old, so I thought he might be going through a teething phase or something. He has a few chew toys and gets plenty of exercise in the evenings. We do get a few young children coming over to play with him so I don't want this to continue in case he hurts one of them; those puppy teeth are sharp!

    Can anyone offer any advice about how to encourage him to stop or what might have brought this on?

  2. #2

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    Poppy did this. It was the teething stage (actually I think its still happening but to a lesser degree)!

    We would say NO and hold her mouth closed for a second everytime she mouthed us. Then give her a toy/raw hide to chew.

    We also started giving her bones around the 15 week mark (I think you can give earlier than this) and that seemed to help.

    I think its just about teaching them what is okay to chew on and what isn't.

    Hope that helps! Glad to hear your enjoying little Jax!

  3. #3

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    thanks for the quick reply amy! that makes me feel better...i was getting paranoid that maybe he was just mad at us or something!

    do you think he will just eventually start doing it less and less? and is there something we should do to try and relieve his need to chew? (besides the chew toys...)?

  4. #4
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    No, he will not just start doing it less and less until you correct this behaviour. It is normal, but unacceptable to us humans, for obvious reasons.

    You don't fix it now, you will have a nightmare on your hands later.

    What Amy has done is something many owners do, clamp the mouth shut, pushing the lip in which is very uncomfortable for the dog. At the same time a sharp, firm NO needs to be given.

    Other ways are a water spray bottle. Althouhg many dogs love water, they do not like being squirted with a jet of it in the face. I wouldn't either.
    Others simply walk away and refuse to engage with the dog when it mouths. I'm not a fan of this method, but each to their own.

    Whatever you choose, step on it now. Once the pup has stopped mouthing, try it again. It will take a while for the message to sink in.

    Consistency is the key!

  5. #5

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    I'm no expert but Poppy is now almost 20 weeks and she definately does it less than when she was around the 12 - 16 week age.

    Someone on here once said that chewing is a dogs way of relaxing themselves, like it was a theraputic thing that they like to do so I wouldn't discourage it altogether I would just work on providing alternatives that are chewable.

    Have you got a Kong? If not try and get a puppy one. I got one of the round ones for Poppy and she LOVES it. You stuff it with dry food or treats or peanut butter and they go wild for it. Its made for them to chew away at it.

    Poppy also likes the raw hides in the shape of bones. I haven't given pigs ears as I've heard they are rich and can upset puppy tummys and Poppy has a sensitive tummy anyway so we stick to the hides.

    Also look at bones. I think RAW chicken wings are good. I give Pop's lamb briskit bones and she adores them! I'm not sure if Jax is too little for those but someone more knowledgable should be able to tell you (like your vet). They much prefer chewing on a bone than on a plain old toy!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    No, he will not just start doing it less and less until you correct this behaviour. It is normal, but unacceptable to us humans, for obvious reasons.

    You don't fix it now, you will have a nightmare on your hands later.

    What Amy has done is something many owners do, clamp the mouth shut, pushing the lip in which is very uncomfortable for the dog. At the same time a sharp, firm NO needs to be given.

    Other ways are a water spray bottle. Althouhg many dogs love water, they do not like being squirted with a jet of it in the face. I wouldn't either.
    Others simply walk away and refuse to engage with the dog when it mouths. I'm not a fan of this method, but each to their own.


    Whatever you choose, step on it now. Once the pup has stopped mouthing, try it again. It will take a while for the message to sink in.

    Consistency is the key!
    GREAT advice here!!! I forgot about the squirt bottle! It was always in reach for the first few weeks we had Poppy. She decided the coffee table was a great thing to chew and so we would simply squirt and she would stop. Needless to say she doesnt chew the coffee table anymore!

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    I watched Pretty with the pups and the way she disciplines them still ( 2 blue heelers now close to 6 months old) is to grab their muzzle in her mouth. I have just continued this but with a NO. I do not growl at them because I am a human, not a dog.

    Has worked well.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #8
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    I have two 12 wk old puppies, teeth like needles, the teething stage takes up to about 9 months.

    I say ouch and end any contact with them, walk away out of their reach either inside or into a room where they cannot go for a few minutes.

    If they hurt each other the one that got hurt squeals and walks off, sometimes the other puppy will try to engage in play but the face on the hurt one clearly says bug off.

    I notice the older dogs don't interact with them too much when they are having their mad moments, they turn their heads away from them and walk off.

    Their mother is the only one that growls at them, but like the others she then walks off and puts herself out of their reach.

  9. #9

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    Ah, I remember this from Teddy and Pipi.


    My advice is to stand up put your hands behind your back and walk away. This way each time your pup nips and you walk away, they will want to know and should realise why you left.


    Spray bottles are another good option, each time they nip, give them a squirt. Along with a harsh 'No' or Ow!

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