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Thread: Another 'Bonnie' Problem.

  1. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Striker View Post
    *awkward silence* ....well...I don't know any one who is brilliant with dogs. I mean, sure I know plenty of people who are good with them, but only as pets. I don't know any trainers.
    I don't mean you have to find someone who works as a trainer etc...just someone whom you know who has dogs that is...a firm, dominant and confident person when it comes to dogs. Someone who has trained their own dog in basic obedience well, and who doesn't pussy-foot around. I'm not saying you do, but hoping you get what I mean. Hell, now I'm inserting an 'awkward silence.'

    Or, you could enrol Bonnie and yourself in a local obedience training school. That way the trainer would see the problems first-hand, and be rigth there in front of you to help you re-teach Bonnie what is expected of her.

  2. #72
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    I do all the training myself, as 1 I have heard bad things about obedience classes from friends, and 2 Bonnie doesn't concentrate properly around other dogs and people yet.

  3. #73
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    I think you need to enrol in a class tbh, as DA said so the trainer can help you to re-teach Bonnie. It's obvious that you are putting a lot of effort into Bonnie, and you have the best intention, but something isn't working as you know. That's where an experienced trainer can give you guidance.

    There's a few members here from Brisbane, maybe they can suggest a good school in your area?

    In My Home Dog Minding
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  4. #74
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    By your own admission, Striker, the lessons you are giving Bonnie are just not working. You have stated that she is getting worse, overall, not better. She is only 4.5 months old. God help you if these problems are not sorted and fixed soon. Right now she is at an age where one could turn it around and get her under control as a happy obedient dog - but IMHO you really do need help with this at a more personal level than what we can offer you.

  5. #75
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    Training with food also needs to be taught to the handler. You need to be taught when and how to start weaning her off food treats otherwise any dog will only do as it's told when there is food involved.

    I think you need to go to an obedience school, even if they aren't that good so that Bonnie is getting out their for the stimulation and also so that people can help you. Even if you only come away with a couple of things.

    Do you use a bridging word/conditioned reinforcer/marker?

    "In a nutshell" with food you first train with a vending machine mentality.
    Then once the dog understands what you require of it you have to switch to a poker machine mentality. In other words the dog hopes it gets a reward.
    You start to only reward improvements otherwise the dog will stay at the same level or will only work when it can see/smell that you have food.

    And the motivation for the dog to work may not just be food. Remember it is not us that choses what the dog works for. The dog does.

  6. #76
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    Just a curious question, but how did you try to stop bad behaviour when she was a puppy? Such a jumping, chewing, etc (whatever she did when she was young lol).


    Slightly off topic, I never knew that "leaning" on you (laying on your feet, etc.) was a bad behaviour. Leo always get extremely excited when I go outside and he often tries to get into my lap for pats when I sit on the grass lol. He does, however, get off when I tell him to.

  7. #77
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    chewing we always stopped with a sharp NO and the cessation of interaction for at least 15 mins. Jumping was, oddly enough, never a real problem when she was little. I think it has only started being a major problem fairly recently.

  8. #78
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    HAHA! I have (I think) made headway in this field! She has stopped jumping, and is nearly finished heeling!! I may have reason to be cautiously optimistic! I have tried a few days more of my work, and she is responding to it! It may also be that she is growing up, becoming more mature, she is realising that she is smaller, weaker and less dominant than me. Notice I did not say smarter . She still sometimes pushes past me through the gate on walks, but she doesn't sit on me, push past me in the garden, or growl with her regular food. It will definitely be a long, arduous process, but I think I can do it. She is significantly improving, with better all-round manners.

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Striker View Post
    HAHA! I have (I think) made headway in this field! She has stopped jumping, and is nearly finished heeling!! I may have reason to be cautiously optimistic! I have tried a few days more of my work, and she is responding to it! It may also be that she is growing up, becoming more mature, she is realising that she is smaller, weaker and less dominant than me. Notice I did not say smarter . She still sometimes pushes past me through the gate on walks, but she doesn't sit on me, push past me in the garden, or growl with her regular food. It will definitely be a long, arduous process, but I think I can do it. She is significantly improving, with better all-round manners.
    I KNOW you can do it. Turn the think into know, and you are onto the home stretch, Striker.

    Keep it up, constant and firm - and well done.
    Yeah, I noticed you did not say smarter! ROFL. Hell, she's a BC!!!

  10. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by silvershadowwolf24 View Post
    Just a curious question, but how did you try to stop bad behaviour when she was a puppy? Such a jumping, chewing, etc (whatever she did when she was young lol).


    Slightly off topic, I never knew that "leaning" on you (laying on your feet, etc.) was a bad behaviour. Leo always get extremely excited when I go outside and he often tries to get into my lap for pats when I sit on the grass lol. He does, however, get off when I tell him to.
    Apologies for delay, I missed seeing this post SSW.

    Yes, leaning. As in, you are walking with your dog. He leans into you, pushing against your leg/thigh. You are sitting at the computer, or table, and he will lay right on top of your feet and calves. He will lay on as much of your body as he can manage.
    It is known as 'leaning' and has long been believed by most breeders, dog-show-enthusiasts and vets I have known, that it is a form of the dog showing he feels he must protect his owner, not the other way around. Seen it with a lot of dogs, particularly Shepherds. So much so, that many regulars in the show-ring make an effort to teach newcomers/novices not to allow it, the reasoning behind it, and how to combat it. Blah ...Lol.

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