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Thread: Another 'Bonnie' Problem.

  1. #61
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    I wish I had enough room to keep a few sheep. The I could really give her what she needs to be mentally *dare I say it* sane. We are thinking of getting chickens, not because of her, but... well... would she be able to herd them or would she just kill them? I know that is a stupid idea, but would it work? Would it help her to be mentally stimulated?

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Striker View Post
    I will try it, but God I hope it works. Like I said, she has steadily been getting worse with carrying out commands, she'll just look at you unless you physically make her do them.
    Striker, this question may need precise long,drawn out answers, but HOW are you going about training her in her basic obedience?

  3. #63
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    Well....if she knows I have treats, she will nearly always cooperate to the best of her abilities. If not, then she isn't very interested. About all she will do without treats is Sit, stay, shake and down. Sometimes speak. It's pretty weird, sometimes she'll do the whole routine in the park, with plenty of distractions, and no treats.

  4. #64
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    Some Behaviors that May Indicate Dominance:

    Pushing through doors, inside or outside, before you.

    Jumping or reaching for food or treat before it is put down or in reach.

    Putting his or her feet on you, standing on or pawing at you.

    Barking at you when told to do something or when he or she wants something.

    Trying to be physically taller than you.

    Getting on furniture before you or before being given permission.

    Reluctance to move from a spot you want to sit on, walk through or put something in.

    Reluctance to release food or toys.


    Staring at you; prolonged eye contact except when you ask for it in a training or working situation.


    Reluctance to obey simple, normal commands such as sit, go-out, get-off, etc. May be a refusal or slow compliance.

    Marking (urinating or defecating) in house, marking your personal belongings or bed.

    Running into you or jumping on you hard during play. This is a display of physical superiority and rights.

    Growling or barking at you during play.

    Sexual behaviors, such as mounting, with an inappropriate partner. Putting her or his head on or over your head or shoulders.

    Holding chews or toys against you while chewing or playing with toy.

    Any attempt to shove you out of the way when walking, sitting with, moving past or laying with you.

    Mouthing you at any time, any placing of her or his mouth on you whether in protest, during play or during petting.

    Eating before you.

    Not accepting petting or touching on top of his or her head or body.

    Getting playful or cute instead of obeying when told to do things. The dog may obey briefly and immediately resume previous behavior.

    Guarding food, toys or locations that they see as theirs.


    Yep she's dominant. These are traits that indicate dominance in a dog. These are also traits found in Bonnie. I found this on a show dog website, along with this bit of info: "Dominance should be of special concern to breeders because, too often, high working drive and dominant behaviors go together. You can have one without the other but I have rarely seen high working drive in a non-dominant animal".

  5. #65
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    Yeah...maybe some of those things are dominant behaviour...but I also think a lot of dog owners out there (not to mention behavioural experts and trainers) would argue that many of those things on the list are just a basic lack of good social manners that haven't been taught to them correctly.

    For instance, have you tried allowing someone else who is extremely dog-savvy and experienced in training dogs to have a go with Bonnie? Just for...curiousness sake?
    Often what can happen is that you put the dog with someone else, and the dog behaves completely different. Would be interesting to know the outcome if you were in a situation to organise that.

  6. #66
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    YES thank you for reminding me. I forgot to mention that at the local park, whenever she sees another person, she whines, and if she's allowed to, she'll run up to them and immediately roll onto her belly. It's not fair! She's immediately submissive to people she doesn't know, but acts superior to me and my family!

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Striker View Post
    YES thank you for reminding me. I forgot to mention that at the local park, whenever she sees another person, she whines, and if she's allowed to, she'll run up to them and immediately roll onto her belly. It's not fair! She's immediately submissive to people she doesn't know, but acts superior to me and my family!
    Oh my. Lol. That's not quite what I meant, though. I meant to literally hand her over, collar, dog and leash to a real dog-savvy person. Let them do a training session with her. See how she behaves. Does she obey every command they give her, or not? Will she heal beside them, or not? Sit, stay, drop, whatever - or not?

    If she does, you have your answer, whether you like the answer - or not.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Striker View Post
    Well....if she knows I have treats, she will nearly always cooperate to the best of her abilities. If not, then she isn't very interested. About all she will do without treats is Sit, stay, shake and down. Sometimes speak. It's pretty weird, sometimes she'll do the whole routine in the park, with plenty of distractions, and no treats.
    This is one reason why I don't train with treats. All my life I have believed that when training a dog who is yours, whom you love and whom loves you in return, a kind word in a pleased voice and a gentle, calm pat on the head is all that is neccesary to have them wanting to please you more.

  9. #69
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    *awkward silence* ....well...I don't know any one who is brilliant with dogs. I mean, sure I know plenty of people who are good with them, but only as pets. I don't know any trainers.

  10. #70
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    Striker, I've been following this thread with interest, but could you clarify please, are you doing the training all on your own or are you taking Bonnie to obedience classes as well? (sorry if I've missed it somewhere)

    In My Home Dog Minding
    www.greyhoundrescue.com.au

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