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Thread: Another 'Bonnie' Problem.

  1. #41
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    Again I am different in my opinions. The pup's toys are in the corner and when they are inside they are free to go and get whatever toys they like to play with. Keeps me and them happy. I do not feel like their lives have to be micromanaged by me and that some behaviours like that are fine with us and our situation. I do agree on the teaching to let you get a bone or toy out of mouth as sometime you may have to get something dangerous away from them and like DA I believe when that is accomplished they shpuld be left in peace with them, just taking it now and then for reinforcement, rewarding with pat, voice then giving it straight back.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  2. #42
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    Default Food Related Aggression

    Hi Everyone- I realize this is an old thread, but I did not see any posts with this point of view.

    Teach Bonnie that you are not competing with her for food. Tell her that you do not want to steal her food, nor do you want to fight her for food. I have instructions on dogand.com

    Here's how.

    Happy Training!
    dogand

  3. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    Okay, thanks.

    I would never give a dog a real bone and then approach or touch them. With my dogs, I knew I could, but I had ensured that by training right from puppyhood.

    There are some things that I repect, and one of them is to let a dog be a dog. We are trying to civilise them sooo much it is sad. I believe we are killing dogs via ignorance, and the inability to recognise they ARE DOGS.

    Choose to give your dog a real meaty juicy yummy bone - but then respect their instinct.
    Totally agree!

    I have a very, very food agro dog - I let him be - He gets his bone, is locked in the run and lets me know when he is happy to come out.

    Also, on the smoked bones, someone gave Atlas one years ago, he spent a few days in the vets very sick, vet said that they are no good for dogs and they see a lot come in with the same gut problems when they are given smoked bones, will never feed my dogs them again!!

    www.cinspets.com.au
    I am doing Relay For Life in 2011, please contact me to make a donation

  4. #44
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    Hi guys, not much info on the bone thing, but something else I thought I should bring up is jumping. When I come outside, she will jump all over me until I say NO. Sometimes she will nip me and nip my clothes, and today she put a hole in my favourite shirt. I was pretty ticked off, because that is not the first time she has put holes in my clothes. I have looked up various alpha-reinforcing exercises, so I will be trying some of them, although a number of them are already ok with Bonnie.

  5. #45
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    Jeez Striker, it's just one thing after another with Bonnie, isn't it? I don't think you're having a good time of it. Lol.

    How old is this pup now? And this behaviour hasn't been stopped? Mate, I seriously don't know how you are putting up with all this, sorry.

    Usually jumping is best dealt with and stopped as a very young puppy. Have you been trying to stop this all this time, or what? So you say NO and she stops? Or does she keep jumping?

    When she comes running up to you when you step outside, do you command her to sit first as she gets to you? Or does she just ignore any commands and jump all over you? Sorry for all the questions, but without all the facts it's hard to advise, hope you understand.

    Worst-case-scenario, a dog who is persistently jumping with a temperament such as Bonnie has, I would have no hesitation in lifting my leg up so her chest collides with my knee every time she jumps up. No hesitation whatsoever! And to be perfectly honest, I wouldn't be shy about it either!

    Regards the nipping, is she lkiterally nipping you, as in small actual bites, or is she 'mouthing' you? - ie: jumping around trying to get your hands etc in her mouth. I have a feeling she's truly nipping, but thought I should check.

    Look, who is her Master/leader? Is it you, is it your husband, partner, who?

  6. #46
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    The jumping is stopping gradually, because I have been doing that knee thing for a while now. The nipping, I'm not quite sure how to classify it, but she does it with the front of her teeth. It only hurts when she gets certain spots, like the inside of the crook of your arm, you know tender spots like that, but I guess that I would classify it as mouthing. Bonnie is 4 1/2 months old now, and I am supposed to be her master, as she is my dog. I looked up a couple of websites on dog aggression/food aggression and realized that a submissive dog will always back off. She does not. So my next question is how do I reassert my alpha position? Because I know now that there is confusion regarding the alpha status, she wants to be alpha at any cost. I wish I could send you guys a mind image of what I am talking about, it is so frustrating not being able to express what I mean in one session. Even with multiple posts, I can't fully get across exactly what I mean.

    Also, I read on a site that if the dog thinks it is alpha that it will not perform commands reliably. She is getting worse with the tricks thing, she knows them but only does a few, occasionally. Listen guys, this is going beyond puppy pushiness, so the first step is reasserting my dominance. How do I do that?


    P.s. I thought it would be worth mentioning that if I have food in a bowl, she will back off until I let her have it. Also, she tries to lie on me sometimes if I am sitting down.
    Last edited by Striker; 02-14-2010 at 11:25 AM.

  7. #47
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    You've got a hyper BC. It needs lots of toys and they need to be rotated. Hang things from trees etc, you need to wear this dog out. It's got built up energy that just needs to get out.

    I wouldn't be worrying about whether the toy comes back to you or not, I'd just be focusing on wearing this dog out for the time being. Until it's energy is spent you won't get thru to it. If it won't bring toys back pick up one your self and make out that you've got the better one, don't wave it up and down in the air wave it back and forwards along the ground like its prey, throw it, if it doesn't bring that one back pick up another. Just wear the dog out a bit.

    As for the jumping you've go to weather the storm and just ignore, put on long sleeves and stand completely still, no reaction what so ever. Any movement by you is stimulating this dog.

    Get out to obedience school and get some help, over the forum is not going to cut it for this dog.

    I have my methods for food aggression which I've posted before, it was the method I was taught by a professional animal trainer so I won't go into that. But I think you need to prove that you're a worth leader with something to offer not just constantly taking away.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Striker View Post
    The jumping is stopping gradually, because I have been doing that knee thing for a while now. The nipping, I'm not quite sure how to classify it, but she does it with the front of her teeth. It only hurts when she gets certain spots, like the inside of the crook of your arm, you know tender spots like that, but I guess that I would classify it as mouthing. Bonnie is 4 1/2 months old now, and I am supposed to be her master, as she is my dog. I looked up a couple of websites on dog aggression/food aggression and realized that a submissive dog will always back off. She does not. So my next question is how do I reassert my alpha position? Because I know now that there is confusion regarding the alpha status, she wants to be alpha at any cost. I wish I could send you guys a mind image of what I am talking about, it is so frustrating not being able to express what I mean in one session. Even with multiple posts, I can't fully get across exactly what I mean.

    Also, I read on a site that if the dog thinks it is alpha that it will not perform commands reliably. She is getting worse with the tricks thing, she knows them but only does a few, occasionally. Listen guys, this is going beyond puppy pushiness, so the first step is reasserting my dominance. How do I do that?


    P.s. I thought it would be worth mentioning that if I have food in a bowl, she will back off until I let her have it. Also, she tries to lie on me sometimes if I am sitting down.
    Striker, one of the first things experienced dog-showers will teach novices is to NEVER allow the dog to 'lean' on you when walking, and to never allow the dog to'lean' or 'lie' on you when you are sitting down etc. For example, you are sitting on the lounge, or at the computer desk, and your dog will come up, lie down and be on top of your feet, hence 'leaning' on you. Most dog behaviouralists have agreed that this action is the result of the dog owning you, and feeling he/she must be the boss/pretector, not you.
    When Bonnie does this, you MUST push her off your feet, leg, thigh, wherever she is actually lying on you, or leaning against you. Just this action alone is very helpful in alleviating dominance issues.

    I agree with you, Bonnie is not a pushy puppy - this is problem behavaiour coming to the front in every way and form. And yeah, it's dangerous.

    There is a lot of info out there about how to get back to the "alpha" or "leadership' position you should be in. Some of it is good, some of it is **** IMO. I think it's up to each person what they take on board, what works for them and their dog, and what doesn't.

    Try and read up on as much of that info as you can.
    I do haveone question? What breed is your other dog? Is this your first BC?

  9. #49
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    My other dog is a border collie also, which is why it sort of came as a surprise to me that Bonnie has so many issues. Mouseandchicken, she certainly is not a hyper border collie, she is not super destructive and is mostly just a normal dog. She gets an hour and a half walk/run everyday without fail - she is whacked after that. I think her problem is confusion over dominance, not hyper activity.

  10. #50
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    I agree. To me, Bonnie is not displaying (from what I've followed with your descriptions from the beginning) and signs of boredom or hyper-activity etc. This is clearly (to me, anyway) a set in concrete case of her exerting her authority over you.

    Now whether that is because it is in her temperament/nature, or because of any mistakes you have made yourself is up to you to decide. IMO you have a dog who is challenging your authority as leader every step of the way - the only person who can change that is you.

    Where to start?

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