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Thread: I Am Ready to Give Up

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

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    Hi Masha, im feeling very sorry for you, i empathise like you would not believe.

    Ive been a "Dora owner". Here's how i avoided:
    suicide
    killing my dog
    my dog killing other dogs
    giving up

    1. Find a dog school - see, you're allready on the right road.
    2. Think of this school as a 'etiquette school', its the place she's going to learn manners and etiquette, how to be a lady, and stop acting like crack addict trailer park trash lol
    3. Explain to the dog trainers, what you are going to do....
    Do the class, but at the distance away from the other dogs, where you have complete control and Dora is behaving as if she has manners. Where she can watch and concentrate on you ignoring the other dogs. With my rottie, it took 4 weeks to get half a tennis court close to other dogs without being a idiot about it.
    4. If you hit trouble, ie, she's growling, or barking at another dog, do a quick U turn, and head off in other direction. The idea being to distract her attention away from the dogs, and get her focus back onto you.
    5. Ask a friend with a dog, to meet you at neutral ground. Local park etc. Walk toward the firends dog, with Dora on a very loose leash. (sends lovely signals that you are not expecting trouble from her, you are relaxed, thus she should be).
    The MINUTE she starts to show aggression "goes stiff, up on her toes, staring at other dog front on, hackles up, growling" etc, U-Turn and walk away from approaching dog. Once she is settled, turn around and repeat. Repeat for as long as it takes her to get the message, that poor manners will not get her anywhere.
    Keep her focussed on you, buy a steak cook it well so its less messy for you, cut it into 2mm pieces, keep her attention on you/food as you pass the dog. Tell her she's a good girl for watching you, and not being a 'bitch'. Use her inner pig to overcome her poor manners.
    The idea is not to punish, but to redirect her attention onto you, and the food.
    Repitition is the name of the game. Serious repitition, till she finds other dogs no challenge. It takes ages i know, and you wish you had one of those happy go lucky dogs like the others at the school. She may well never be a sociable dog, but she can learn manners and not react.

    What tends to happen in these situations, is you begin to avoid other dogs, like walking Dora at night, not at 'peak times' in parks, this will re-inforce her behaviour. You must expose her gradually, gently to the situation. Any stupid behaviour is met with a "no" word, and U turn.

    If out walking, make her sit or lay down, you have more control over her in this position, than if she's upright. Keep her focus on you, not the approaching dog. YOu may need to do this by crossing over to the other side of the road to get success intially. Mind numbingly boring and repetative Baby Steps is the key to success.

    Hang in there love! She'll be able to pass another dog, without being silly one day with practice.

    Bernie

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Wodonga
    Posts
    2,672

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    and I thought getting a dogs attention was a simple fact of bulding a bond with it

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE Suburbs - Melbourne
    Posts
    487

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    Beautifully said Bernie...

    Couldn't have said it better myself.
    Dogs Aren't Our Whole Lives, But They Make Our Lives Whole


  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
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    First long post is up!

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Masha! Masha! Masha!

    Ok, Dora looks like part / all JRT - not the easiest dog to train but it can be done. You might pull a lot of hair out but it can be done. They are very smart but they are also very sneaky and will take advantage of any weakness in you so be very firm and definite.

    Bernie's post was great as were quite a few of the others.

    For you - as soon as it feels like it's all going to hell - walk away from the trouble - take Dora with you. Then breathe in slowly count to 1 and 2 and 3 and, and breathe out. Repeat until you start to feel vaguely normal. Ignore Dora while you do this.

    If you're at dog school you might be able to hand Dora off to someone else you trust (who isn't with another dog) until you feel better but if you can deprive Dora of your attention while you calm down, she should work harder to please you when she gets it back. Don't look at her.

    And then try again. The minute Dora shows aggression - drag her away, ignore her while you count to three, if she's calm, treat her, and try again. Lots of tiny exposures and lots of repeats, slowly build up to better things. And don't be upset if it goes backwards from time to time.

    Dog calming things you can do while you're blocking - lick your lips, look away from your dog and the source of her excitement / aggression. Yawn a lot, act bored, don't look directly at Dora. The minute Dora looks at you instead of the other dogs give her a nice high pitched happy "good dog" and treat. Don't approach the excitement until she's reliably looking at you, then try again with the meet and greet. The minute she lunges/barks/growls - go back to block, bored, watch me. repeat...

    Our old family heeler kelpie cross had "sit", "stay", "come" and "fetch" all reliable at about 4 months. Frosty is one year and 2 months and knows all these words and what they mean but reliable - definitely not. Then again I did want an "independent thinker". I got one. A dog that is super obedient can be super demanding of you to give it a job to do ALL THE TIME. And that is almost as hair pulling as the dog that likes to do its own thing. Every dog is different - don't expect Dora to be like the other puppies. However if you meet someone with a super obedient terrier type - you might want to ask them how they got there.

    If the treats are not working - try upping the quality and variety - very tiny pieces of roast chicken, fritz, dried fish, stinky is good.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE Suburbs - Melbourne
    Posts
    487

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    masha as for treats try Happy Paws Training Treats - GSDs4Eva on here makes them. I swear the dogs love them as they have no idea what they are going to get next and it all natural with absolutely preservative free...

    Great post hyacinth
    Dogs Aren't Our Whole Lives, But They Make Our Lives Whole


  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,048

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    Angela, where did you put your post up?

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