Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: Great News

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Devonport, Tasmania
    Posts
    6,675

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Masha View Post
    So I've mentioned briefly that Dora is having trouble walking. I can barely get her out of the drive way before she sits and won't move.
    In another thread I read how you guys treated your kids when they threw tantrums: by ignoring them. So when I got out of the drive with Dora, as always, she sat down and wouldnt move. After a few seconds she started trying to run back to the house. I stood my ground. I stood up nice and straight, tried to feel 'calm and powerful' and told her: We aren't going back to the house till you walk. She kept lunging towards the house. I looked away and ignored her, waiting for her to get it into her thick skull that walk = coming home. I stood there for a good 50 minutes, ignoring her as she lunged towards the house. Then, finally!, she got it. She sat at my feet, and when I tried to walk, she followed! After a bit of good, oedient walking, I gave her a treat, telling her "Good girl!". Every 20 metres I gave her a treat, praising her. She didn't walk perfectly all the way. Two times she sat down, and I ignored her again till she walked to my feet and sat. But you know what? When I came home after a relatively good walk (compared to the others!!) I was satisfied, and I also had a nice, tired pup. I am hopeful that this hour and ten minutes of patience will have full effect in the future: walk = coming home!
    Lol Masha.

    Unfortunately, with a dog it is NOT going to be a once off thing. But have patience, good things come to those who wait.

    Seriously, there is such a method similar to the above many ppl use when dealing with a dog who lunges on leash etc.

    Step forward, dog on left side of you (if right handed, of course) and walk. The moment Dora pulls, lunges, goes in any other direction that causes the leash to go taut and not be slack as it should be, stop in yourr tracks. Do not move, do not speak to her, literallyh be a statue. Do not make eye contact. Once she has returned to your side and is looking up wondering WTH you are doing and why you are stopping, give the command to walk and step off again.

    Hell, in 10 minutes you might get 2 metres. LOL! But it can work, and is a great training method for those who have patience and consistency.

    I think Hyacinth may have used this form of leash training? Not sure, so forgive me if I'm wrong.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Rule of thumb for time walking puppies - 5 minutes per month of age. So if puppy is 3 months old - 15 minutes of walking is enough in one session. This helps avoid joint problems later in life and is most important with the bigger dogs, or dog breeds prone to joint problems.

    Wasn't me that suggested the stop start idea - was one of the Staffy owners I think - to stop SBT from pullling. Seems like a good idea. Trouble with Frosty was - she doesn't care - though I've never waited 50 minutes for her to figure it out.

    The instruction I got for when she sat down or lay down and hugged the ground was to "just pull" ie I pull on the lead and drag her - though she always got up and walked before there was any dragging. The instruction I got before that from someone else was to pick her up and carry her past the first two houses. Ok when she was 5kg but she's 22kg now.

    And then when we were walking - she pulls so I got the sensible harness - which stopped that with no strangling. And now I can walk her to the park on a flat collar (sometimes I forget to put the harness on). But if she starts pulling we do the stop start thing until she gets it or if she doesn't - I just put the harness back on. Trouble with her, she stops pulling and sits the minute I stop, but starts pulling again the minute I go - hasn't quite equated the pulling with not going. Probably my fault for not doing the stop start thing from the beginning but I didn't know then. Previous dogs - back in the dark ages we corrected with a mighty heave on the lead which practically back flipped them. This worked but I didn't know I was risking breaking their necks doing it. Never did any damage to those dogs so I didn't learn until I started reading where vet staff post.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,048

    Default

    Yep. I took her out for another walk just now - had to stand there waiting 20 minutes before she walked. She finally did, but kept stopping every ten or so meters for a second. I only walked her for five (even less I think) minutes because it started raining. I made sure to turn home when she walk walking properly by my side, not pulling to go back, so it was I who made the decision to go back, not her.
    I have a feeling that my patience will be tested many, many times in the following week(s).
    Last edited by Masha; 01-13-2010 at 06:17 PM. Reason: adding

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Masha

    You could try adding "good dog" and talking to her in a happy chirpy voice when she's doing the right thing, and a normal toned "uh uh" when she stops. And then try "heel" and pull. Or do your waiting thing. Adding "good dog" and "uh uh" is like playing the game of "hot" and "cold" to let her know when she's doing the right thing and when she's not doing what you want.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,048

    Default

    The hot and cold game is a very good idea. I've just being saying 'good girl!' in a slightly high pitched tone, but not saying anything when she stopped. I'll try that on my next walk Thanks

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sunshine Coast, Qld
    Posts
    909

    Default

    Sounds like you're making great progress Masha, well done
    The best things in life, aren't things

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,048

    Default

    Thanks
    Still a long way to go, but we'll get there. I just cant help daydreaming about how when she's gonna be older she'll be better... that is, until I remember that it's up to me to make that daydream come true!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,596

    Default

    Frosty seemed like a very slow learner when it comes to things like recall and stay, but she's getting better. Other dogs I've had, worked these out very young. Be persistent and you will get there. And it's ok to do lots of very short training sessions - based on puppy attention spans. I hope yours learns to love walks. We're still not there yet with Frosty - she's just a bit weird like that.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •