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Thread: The Puppy Training, Hints and Tips Thread

  1. #61
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    I can imagine it would be very hard for a polite teenager to tell an older person to back off. But that is exactly what you need to do.

    Perhaps try a different method.

    Please don't touch her we are Training. If you wouldn't mind assisting me by just standing next to me and talking that would be a big help. But she must not be touched.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    I can imagine it would be very hard for a polite teenager to tell an older person to back off. But that is exactly what you need to do.

    Perhaps try a different method.

    Please don't touch her we are Training. If you wouldn't mind assisting me by just standing next to me and talking that would be a big help. But she must not be touched.
    Definitely. I'll try that next time. I just need her accustomed to walking before I even think about letting people touch her.
    Am I the only one who ever asks a person if I can pat their dog? I never touch a dog without the owners permission, and even then I only pat their backs (I heard patting the head is very dominant and thats why dogs bite in the first place)

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    I can imagine it would be very hard for a polite teenager to tell an older person to back off. But that is exactly what you need to do.

    Perhaps try a different method.

    Please don't touch her we are Training. If you wouldn't mind assisting me by just standing next to me and talking that would be a big help. But she must not be touched.
    VERY good advice

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mouseandchicken View Post
    I let as many people touch my dogs as possible. Being show dogs they have to be handled. Doesn't mean I let people frighten the dog, there is a big difference

    I always do looming exercises over my dogs, handle them around the face and teeth, ears and you know what for the boys. But generally loom over them which is often what inexperienced people and kids do to dogs.

    I'll admit I start this with family and friends while they're still in the whelping box so that by the time they hit the streets they are bomb proof.

    I remember being at Sydney Royal many years ago, left for 5 mins and came back to find a kid sitting in the box with one of my dogs & the parents taking photo's, thank god they didn't pick my friends dog a few stalls down, because he did not take well to strangers.

    But having said that the Electricity guy will attest to the fact that they kick up a real stink and put on an impressive show of barking when he comes to read the metre which is by the side fence.
    We give ours a daily ears/ears/teeth check (which I'm sure the vet thanks us for lol). My 2 tend to both get a bit of gunk under the eyes, especially Charlie, so we get them to sit down then say "eyes" (or teeth or ears) and they know to stay nice and still while mummy or daddy clean them up. I must admit they're not always keen on teeth but that's just too bad

    MAC, in regards to what happened at the Sydney Royal - you must have the self control of a saint! I would've done my nut lol

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by JudgeTheDeedNotTheBreed View Post
    perhaps try clapping your hands loudly to get her attention and then NO! ???
    I have found clapping twice loudly and saying "NO" is HIGHLY effective with Sally when she jumps up and/or tries to nip clothing or hands. I clap so loudly that I end up with sore hands, but it works. YAY!
    Vanessa

  6. #66
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    Yes, I've learnt to be very patient, being in the dog world for the past 21 years I've had to.

    People's ignorance is what led me to raising my puppies in the house years back. Gone are the days of having a tidy house but at least I am confident that I have given my puppies the best start.

    Where once I didn't like little kids holding the puppies for fear they would break them, I now stop whatever I'm doing and assist the child.

  7. #67
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    Masha -

    I got my rescue whippet as an 8/9 year old dog. She had been abused most if not all her life. When she came to me she was fearful, useless on lead and generally unhappy. I have now had her for just over a year and apart from still being fearful of storms and firecrackers (which a lot of dogs are) she is a different dog.

    Forget about what HAS happened and work on what you can do for your pup NOW. Read all you can but disregard what doesn't work for you and what doesn't work for your pup.

    As all good mother's say "If he told you to jump off the bridge, would you do it?".

    If someone told me that I had never met, didn't know to the extent that they were capable with dogs AND humans, to do something as "This will work" doesn't mean that I HAVE to do what they say.

    As a lot of people on here have said, have fun with your pup, enjoy the time that they are a pup, and play games that will also teach.

    And remember pups are not pups forever.

  8. #68
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    Id go with the ignore scared Dora, reward any relaxing of posture.
    A water pistol should work nicely on the old lady who keeps touching her, or a tazer? But seriously, on the 'if you cant beat em, join em theory', how about giving said old bat, a food treat to feed Dora? She's clearly a dog nut, harness her energy for the good of Dora, as she's clearly not going to take any notice of you.

    My first ever dog, was a rough collie at 2yrs of age, frightened of walking. Took 6 months of ignoring scared dog, rewarding confidence to overcome this. And 6 months before he actually 'ran' or 'trotted' rather than cowered/crawled outside of the garden/home domain. Turned into a 7 challenge certificate obedience dog in the uk.
    Hang in there, Dora will get it eventually. Repetition, repetition, repetition n all that jazz.
    Bernie

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by cate0404 View Post
    Masha -

    I got my rescue whippet as an 8/9 year old dog. She had been abused most if not all her life. When she came to me she was fearful, useless on lead and generally unhappy. I have now had her for just over a year and apart from still being fearful of storms and firecrackers (which a lot of dogs are) she is a different dog.

    Forget about what HAS happened and work on what you can do for your pup NOW. Read all you can but disregard what doesn't work for you and what doesn't work for your pup.

    As all good mother's say "If he told you to jump off the bridge, would you do it?".

    If someone told me that I had never met, didn't know to the extent that they were capable with dogs AND humans, to do something as "This will work" doesn't mean that I HAVE to do what they say.

    As a lot of people on here have said, have fun with your pup, enjoy the time that they are a pup, and play games that will also teach.

    And remember pups are not pups forever.
    Yep, everyone says that I take what I read way too close to heart. Its a bad habit that I cant seem to get rid of. But with all this new info, I'm throwing out Cesar.

  10. #70
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    Ok, Here is the long post I’ve been promising for a few days now. I’m sorry for not having it done, I know a lot of you have been looking forward to it.

    My first tip: NO jumping on anyone ever, unless invited. Yes an eight week old puppy can grasp this. What I did with Batty is as follows: Batty comes running up to say hi (I take the opportunity to start teaching come, he’s running to me anyway so I say “Batty, Come!” in a happy higher pitched tone and he’s happier to keep coming.) when he gets to me his first thought was to jump to get closer to me, I actually use my hand on his chest to gently put him on the ground then start patting him. Be gentle!! When he stays on the ground I use a lot of praise while patting him calmly. Once he has the idea that the pats come when he stays on the ground (and AFTER I’ve taught him to sit) I begin asking him to sit before he gets the pats. I want a dog that will sit at my feet when I call him, I will be doing obedience and agility competitions with him after he’s turned one, and I will change the behaviour for the competitions, but I also have my hubby’s grandma visiting often and I want him to start sitting at peoples feet when he is called for pats. Batty is now at the stage where he will come up to you and sit down without being asked. He’s been learning this for 3 weeks.

    First Game: This is kind of a ‘chase me, chase you’ game. I get down on the ground on my hands and knees and tap my hands on the ground, then I crawl away from Batty making funny noises so he follows and starts playing. I find having a small toy to pop in his mouth works really well for preventing him nipping me when he gets over-excited. I usually crawl around on the floor with Batty when we’re playing so it’s been brilliant for building up his confidence. The more fun you have with it the better the puppy will enjoy it. The other thing I’ll do with him is lay down on the ground and allow him to walk over the top of me for cuddles (not recommended for bossy pups!) and that’s when I calm him down and he’ll usually lay by my side and fall asleep, sometimes I'll just sit on the ground and he will curl up in my lap or right next to me.

    Second Game: “Show Me What You’ve Got/Fetch” This game has been brilliant with teaching Batty to give things to me. I start having some roast chicken sliced or cubed up ready to give Batty, I encourage him to chase one of his balls and when he grabs it and starts running back to me I start to move away so he follows. When he gets to me I say “Can I See?” and offer the treat, he spits out the ball and takes the treat with praise. Now no matter what he has I can say “Can I See” and Batty will come over and spit out whatever is in his mouth, even just for a pat!

    Confidence building exercises are very easy to do. Start with lots of treats in your pocket, ask for something simple (that you have already taught puppy – ie Sit) then lay on the praise with a trowel! Lots of pats, BIG HAPPY praise, big fuss for doing it right, even if you only ask for it once.
    Right now I’m laying on the ground on my tummy, propped up on my elbows with Batty cuddled up at my side. Don’t worry too much about leadership first, the most important thing at first is building your bond with your puppy. For me building the bond with Batty has come through doing some things wrong, things like greeting him too soon when I get home, allowing him to sit on my lap when I’m on the floor (well I don’t think this is wrong per say, but I won’t be letting him when he is older, I hope that makes sense?).

    Please take note of the fact that this is what works for me, you will need to find your niche with your puppy and be creative!

    Don’t be afraid of baby talk or making funny voices/noises for your puppy, be happy and upbeat and give them a chance to learn. Oh, don't be afraid of looking like a twit either! It's par for the course

    If puppy does something wrong correct him or her, but show him or her the right thing to do. Say ‘No’ and clap your hands, when you have puppy’s attention show him or her a chew toy, or ask for a sit and give a treat before redirecting puppy’s attention onto something like a pigs ear to chew up. Don’t just punish them and walk away ignoring them. Puppy will go directly back to doing what you’ve just told them not to!

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