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Thread: Jumping, Biting Puppy

  1. #1
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    Default Jumping, Biting Puppy

    Sally is now 10 weeks old, and will be starting puppy classes in a few days, but I was just after a couple of tips as to how to get her to stop jumping up, biting, and pulling at clothing with her teeth. She is noticeably bigger than she was 2 weeks ago when we got her, and the bites are getting harder!

    My kids tend to freak out when she jumps up on them, especially my 4-year-old, who runs away shrieking. Of course then Sally thinks that it's a game, and just goes for it harder.

    I've been consistent with not allowing her to get away with jumping up, usually by saying "Sally off!" repeatedly until she does actually stop jumping, then getting her to sit, then praising her when she does. This works for about 2 seconds, when she will usually start trying to nip at my hand when I pat her. Sometimes distracting her with a toy will work, but usually she'll steadfastly ignore the toy in favour of going for my hand or my shirt. I then have to pry her jaws open to save my clothing.

    When it's me she's jumping on or trying to nip, I can try ignoring her until she calms down, but when she's going for the kids I have to intervene physically.

    Any tips would be appreciated, thanks!!
    Vanessa

  2. #2
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    Try having 4 ten week old monsters doing this, all at the same time....eeerrrk.
    I am having some success with NO, and DOWN, pushing them gently down, repeating then rewarding with praise when they do. It is very hard with 4 excitable puppies though. I have found the behaviour is quietening though and Jodi is the fastest learner, I think her nature too is gentler than the others. With the teeth, I do as their mother does. I gently grab them around the snout with a no, and keep repeating it. Loving praise when they stay down and hold their teeth. Sometimes I put my thumb in their mouths, gentle pressure on the tongue and jaw, and a no.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  3. #3
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    Ignoring it is the best way to go IMO. I'm sure Sally does think it's a giant game with your kids, especially if they run away shrieking. Maybe you could try explaining to your kids that when they make loud noises it makes the puppy excited?? I don't know, I don't have kids and I have no idea what you do with them lol.

    With the nipping, we sometimes do as Di does - put gentle pressure on the bottom of the mouth, it seems to work.

    Charlie tends to get excited when you play with his toys with him and tries to snatch things out of your hand. To combat this we are teaching him the command "gentle", meaning he has to take things gently out of your hand. Maybe you could teach Sally a command like this, and also teach the kids to use it?

  4. #4
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    Hi Vanessa,
    You really have two issues here to deal with if I'm reading things correctly:
    One - the jumping up on ppl,
    Two - the biting, mouthing etc.

    A great way to entice a dog kindly not to jump up at ppl is to put yourself more down at their level in the first place. I do mean that literally. Squat down, or bend over and be more at a level the dog is on. The little puppy is sooo far away from the human standing upright, after all.
    I have found this works a treat with many puppies and even older dogs. It stops the reason they are jumping up in the first place. When they greet you and sit without jumping up, then obviously that is the time to pile on the praise. Must be praised calmly though, or you will only tend to get the puppy excited all over again.

    As a last resort, putting your knee out can also work. It is not pleasant for a jumping dog to receive a knee in their chest, but once again this also depends on what dog you have and size etc. Should you choose to do this, you must follow up by getting the pup to sit and be greeted calmly. That way he/she will understand what is expected other than the jumping.

    The mouthing/biting must be stopped immediately. That is no 1 priority IMO. You have already seen how much harder the bites feel after only 2 weeks. Don't stop it now and you will not want to know what they feel like later!
    Various ways of stopping the biting. I tend to be a 'hard and fast' trainer when it comes to this issue. Clamp the puppy's mouth shut, and be VERY firm with your command NO!
    There is the water squirt suggestions and many other things that I'm sure will be made available to you. I personally don't have the time nor inclination to walk around with a spray bottle all day, hence the firmer way of approaching it. It is usually fixed VERY quickly, I must say. Once the pup approaches ppl without biting, make sure you give plenty of praise. Only by praising or not will the pup totally understand what is good and bad, and what is pleasurable or not for them.

    There is also the training option of walking away when pup bites/ouths. He/she gets NO ATTENTION whatsoever, until he/she approaches without biting etc. Then praise is given.

    God, what a long post. Sorry.

  5. #5
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    I just had them all rage and push to get in the door when hubby came in with the shopping (we will be working on that one later more) first time they have seen me today (hubby does the morning raw feed) They were very excitable, started jumping but at no, they all STOPPED! woohoooo. Mind you one or another tried it again but on the whole I am pleased. They are back outside now.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the suggestions - it sounds like I might be on the right track. She's just a very persistent puppy!! I've been trying gently clamping her mouth shut, which she hates, but doesn't seem to be getting the message across yet.
    It is hard with my kids, especially the 4-year-old - it's hard to get her not to panic. Today when I was doing a bit of training with Sally I got my daughter to call her, keep her attention, tell her to sit and to give her a treat. All of this is quite hard for a 4-year-old to do - she kept saying "siiiyyyt", which of course the dog doesn't understand, and then kept forgetting to give the treat straight away. LOL so I need to train the kids too!!
    Vanessa

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    Yea, you do. My son has young kids, got a lab puppy and one turned out to be so scared of it they had to rehome her (the lab, not the son)
    Be aware too of puppy fear periods, there is a calendar here on a post somewhere.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by VanessaE View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions - it sounds like I might be on the right track. She's just a very persistent puppy!! I've been trying gently clamping her mouth shut, which she hates, but doesn't seem to be getting the message across yet.It is hard with my kids, especially the 4-year-old - it's hard to get her not to panic. Today when I was doing a bit of training with Sally I got my daughter to call her, keep her attention, tell her to sit and to give her a treat. All of this is quite hard for a 4-year-old to do - she kept saying "siiiyyyt", which of course the dog doesn't understand, and then kept forgetting to give the treat straight away. LOL so I need to train the kids too!!
    Don't be gentle!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil's Advocate View Post
    Don't be gentle!
    I second this! I tried being gentle with Batty and he thought I was playing. I had to be harsh with him and he now has the message - sometimes he will mouth but he is far more gentle now and doesn't bite down. Batty is now 11 weeks old and we've had him since about 9 weeks old.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela's Gone Batty View Post
    I second this! I tried being gentle with Batty and he thought I was playing. I had to be harsh with him and he now has the message - sometimes he will mouth but he is far more gentle now and doesn't bite down. Batty is now 11 weeks old and we've had him since about 9 weeks old.
    A mother dog is not gentle. (Well, not in some ways is what I am trying to say)
    She is immediate, and she is exact. Retribution is fast and swift, and certainly not gentle. The lesson is then learnt fast, and learnt well.

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