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Thread: Advice on Hip Dysplasia Test

  1. #1
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    Default Advice on Hip Dysplasia Test

    Hi again

    Jenna had her 12 week jabs last week and the vet talked about a test she would like to do, to check for hip dyslpasia. She said it involves a very quick general anaesthetic and moving Jenna's limbs to check for 'laxity in the joints' which would indicate a possible future problem with her hips. She also said it had to be done between 12-16 weeks of age and if it showed a potential problem then there was a proceedure the specialist vet in our area could do to sort of 'set' the ball in the socket to minimise or even completely eliminate the problem in the future. This also had to be done between 12-16 weeks.

    Has anyone heard of this? It was never mentioned to me when Holly was a pup, mind you that was in the UK. Things could be different there. My concern is the stress on Jenna having to have a general anaesthetic so young, especially given she is a nervous pup as it is. However, if this could help any future problems it could be worth it. What do you think?

    Thanks

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    Hi Tkay!

    I can't recall reading any of your posts, so I don't know much about Jenna, sorry.
    General anaesthesia is not a problem if it's done with care and your dog is checked properly beforehand.

    By just moving her limbs it's really not enough to determine whether it is or it isn't dysplasia. For that, she should be X-rayed. I assume she's purebred and you need her for future breeding? Usually breeders do such early dysplasia check-ups, otherwise people do it when dogs are developed and grown up.

    When doing X-rays they have to sedate the dog, so it's relaxed and it can be manipulated in a perfect position. They should measure the angles and by doing that they grade it. HD-A (or HD-0) is clear, and she has perfect hips, then you have HD-B, C, D, E with HD-E being really, really bad. You also have some grades in between like HD-E1 being bad but dog still have some chance, and HD-E3 beain so bad dog sometimes has to be pts.

    Now, about "fixing" her joints. Don't be foolled. Surgery and only surgery (hip/elbow replacements etc.) can help dog to get better. The only thing that might help fix hip dysplasia is proper and very careful breeding program. You shouldn't breed dogs with dysplasia because it is genetic desease (as well as elbow dysplasia).

    Here's a great link about hip dysplasia. Please browse through ad read it before you throw your money on something for nothing:

    http://www.offa.org/hipinfo.html

    here's more:
    http://leerburg.com/hip.htm
    http://www.peteducation.com/article....2+1569&aid=444

    How old is Jenna? Is she having problems walking atm and that's why vet suggested check-up or he just suggested it for the sake of it (which is not bad at all, but not necessary at very early age if she's not for future breeding). Hope she's well and hope that you'll find the link above usefull, I'd actually love others to read it.

    cheers!
    Last edited by Fedra; 08-18-2009 at 03:29 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the reply Fedra.

    I've been on google all evening and I now know what my vet was taking about. The laxity test is called the Ortolani test, the only difference is, most the sites I went on said the tests should not be done until 4 months. My vet said between 12-16 weeks. Not sure now, I would rather wait if possible. I don't think it is as accurate as x-rays but gives a good indication and as it can be done so early the pup can then have the following proceedure

    Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis: A less invasive surgery for treating hip dysplasia is called Juvenile Pubic Symphysiodesis. This surgery prematurely fuses two pelvic bones together, allowing the other pelvic bones to develop normally. This changes the angle of the hips and improves the articulation of this joint, lessening the likelihood of osteoarthritis. Early diagnosis is critical, since the procedure must be done before 20 weeks of age, preferably 16 weeks, and before any signs of arthritis are evident.

    Thanks for the links, very interesting reading.

    In answer to your question. No, I don't intend to breed her and she isn't a pure breed. She is a Golden Retriever x Samoyed. It's the Retriever part that prompted the vet to talk about hip dysplasia.

    Thanks again

  4. #4
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    HD can't be scored until a dog is fully grown IMO. Things that might seem odd now can correct themselves. I wouldn't do it personally.

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    Hi again!

    Well, based on my personal experience, I'd ask myself if this particular vet is an orthopaedist. Don't get me wrong (or, I might be wrong), but I have this funny feeling that he'd like to take your money, and quickly.

    Yes, golden retrivers are very prone to HD, and so are many large breeds, but goldens and retrivers in general are together with GSDs at the top of the list. If it was my dog, I'd wait, as I haven't heard from anyone (and that includes professional orthopaedists) that takes X-rays that early, unless someone's dog has real problems walking and they want to confirm their suspicions.

    I'd also do X-rays and I'd do them at the vet who really knows what they're doing. It is very very important to know how to properly take X-rays to determine the degree of HD (if present), and trust me, not just any John can do it, I assure you.

    So, are you concerned about Jenna's hips just because your vet warned to or are you noticing any problems with her when walking/running/doing things? I'm asking because I feel you're concerned about surgery already.

    Please chose your vet carefully, if paying a lot (I know it costs like hell), pay someone reliable, ask around for vets who regularly do that.

    In the meantime, watch her diet, weight and don't let her jump high and do too many stairs.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fedra View Post
    Hi again!

    Well, based on my personal experience, I'd ask myself if this particular vet is an orthopaedist. Don't get me wrong (or, I might be wrong), but I have this funny feeling that he'd like to take your money, and quickly.

    Yes, golden retrivers are very prone to HD, and so are many large breeds, but goldens and retrivers in general are together with GSDs at the top of the list. If it was my dog, I'd wait, as I haven't heard from anyone (and that includes professional orthopaedists) that takes X-rays that early, unless someone's dog has real problems walking and they want to confirm their suspicions.

    I'd also do X-rays and I'd do them at the vet who really knows what they're doing. It is very very important to know how to properly take X-rays to determine the degree of HD (if present), and trust me, not just any John can do it, I assure you.

    So, are you concerned about Jenna's hips just because your vet warned to or are you noticing any problems with her when walking/running/doing things? I'm asking because I feel you're concerned about surgery already.

    Please chose your vet carefully, if paying a lot (I know it costs like hell), pay someone reliable, ask around for vets who regularly do that.

    In the meantime, watch her diet, weight and don't let her jump high and do too many stairs.
    Hi Fedra

    No, I've not noticed anything wrong with her at all. It's purely a precautionary test that, if it shows anything up, gives us the opportunity to do the early proceedure to hopefully prevent further problems.

    I have been with this vet quite a few years now and I do trust her. The Ortolani test itself doesn't cost that much, basically just the cost of the anaethestic. However, if problems do show up Jenna would be referred to a specialist Orthopaedic Surgeon which would cost alot more, I'm sure. I need to check my insurance.

    If you are interested this link explains the Ortolani test

    Clinician's Brief : Veterinary Medicine Articles : Step by Step: Palpating for the Ortolani Sign When Diagnosing Hip Dysplasia

    Hope that link works, I'm not that hot on the computer

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Occy View Post
    HD can't be scored until a dog is fully grown IMO. Things that might seem odd now can correct themselves. I wouldn't do it personally.
    Oh yes it can! Many serious breeders do early tests (but not as early as Tkay was advised) especially large dog breeders at about 6 months of age to see if there is potential or some changes or abnormalities on a hip.
    Of course, you'd have to repeat the test when dog's fully grown and developed. FCI (I'm not familiar with ANKC) does not recognise those early tests but those done when dog turns 16-18 months, so those earlies are simply just to see, prevent etc.

    As for your vet Tkay, I love my veterinarian, he's absolutely great and I respect him to bits. I still went to another vet who specialises at orthopaedics and hips etc. for a check up. But that's me, anyway

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